Underrated Tourist Destination Oregon

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The Most Underrated Tourist Spot in Every State

The Most Underrated Tourist Spot in Every State

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They might not be world-famous but these spots are worth visiting
Underrated Tourist Destination Oregon

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The most popular tourist destinations in America such as the Grand Canyon or the Statue of Liberty have earned distinction for a reason and certainly deserve a place on your American bucket list. However, certain off-the-grid places shouldn't be overlooked. Not only are many relatively unpopular destinations still just as exciting to visit, but they often also offer fewer crowds, more affordable prices and more authentic, less "touristy" experiences.

You don't have to look far from home to discover a city, charming small town or national park that offers natural beauty, culture, relaxation or fun. Explore the road less traveled and check out the most underrated tourist spot in every state.

Alabama: Mobile

Alabama: Mobile
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The Gulf Coast is home to many vibrant coastal towns, but Mobile, Alabama, has something for every type of traveler. Lounge on the city's multiple white-sand beaches, stroll through squares lined with live oak trees and explore historic neighborhoods. Mobile is also home to one of the largest river deltas and wetlands in the country, nicknamed America's Amazon because of its amazing eco-diversity.

Alaska: Girdwood

Alaska: Girdwood
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Cities like Fairbanks as well as national parks like Denali are the most visited destinations in Alaska. But this sprawling state has many hidden gems, including the charming mountain town of Girdwood. Home to a popular ski resort, Girdwood is surrounded by glaciers that can be explored by hike, kayak or even dog sled. There are hiking trails around the area for all experience levels.

Arizona: Petrified Forest National Park

Arizona: Petrified Forest National Park
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Arizona is world-famous for the gorgeous Grand Canyon and Havasu Falls, one of the most stunning waterfalls in the world. But if you're planning a bucket-list trip to see this state's natural wonders, don't miss Petrified Forest National Park. On top of its namesake petrified logs, the park is filled with mesas, buttes, wildlife, wildflowers and more, which can be seen on a scenic drive or on a hiking, biking or horseback riding trail.

Arkansas: Whitaker Point (Kingston)

Arkansas – Whitaker Point
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Also known as Hawksbill Crag, Whitaker Point is a rock formation that offers one of the most breathtaking views in the country. The ledge dramatically juts out above the beautiful rolling hills of the Ozarks below, making it the perfect place for a romantic moment or an unbelievable photograph. This view can be reached via an easy hike that passes by waterfalls and rock formations. The trail is within the Buffalo River National Area, which is about a one-hour drive from Fayetteville.

California: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park

California: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park
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There is so much more to do in California than just Disneyland and the beach. The state's natural beauty is staggering, with people coming from across the country and even around the world to see sights like Yosemite National Park. But for a more off-the-beaten-path park, check out Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, located about 90 miles northeast of San Diego. The largest of California's state parks, Anza-Borrego has a desert climate but comes alive with vibrant colors in the springtime, making it home to some of the best hikes to see spring wildflowers in the world. It's also one of the best places in the state for stargazing.

Colorado: Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park

Colorado – Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park
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While millions of people visit Colorado's most popular national parks like Rocky Mountain National Park, ditch the crowds while still enjoying rugged beauty at Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park. This underrated national park has a canyon 3,000 feet deep. The Painted Wall is the highest cliff in Colorado. Besides this dramatic backdrop, the park has beautiful trails for hiking as well as opportunities for rock climbing, kayaking and rafting.

Connecticut: Gillette Castle (East Haddam)

Connecticut: Gillette Castle (East Haddam)
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Europe might be home to many of the world's most famous castles, but there are actually majestic castles in America that you can visit, including Gillette Castle in East Haddam, Connecticut. The castle was once a fantastical private residence but now is open for tours seasonally. Outside of the castle, there are also hiking trails, rock formations and more to see.

Delaware: Bethany Beach

Delaware: Bethany Beach
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It might be a beach destination other Americans haven't heard of, but locals know Delaware's Bethany Beach is a calm, clean and family-friendly beach escape. The 1-mile-long beach is lined with an old-fashioned pedestrian-only boardwalk and offers access to fishing, watersports and more.

Florida: Perdido Key

Florida – Perdido Key
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Perdido means “lost” in Spanish, and it's easy to lose track of time in the picturesque beach town of Perdido Key. Located in the northwest corner of Florida, the town and Perdido Key State Park boast stunning views of white-sand dunes and Gulf waters perfect for water sports like parasailing, body surfing and kite surfing as well as swimming and fishing.

Georgia: Providence Canyon (Lumpkin)

Georgia: Providence Canyon (Lumpkin)
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Known as Georgia’s “Little Grand Canyon,” Providence Canyon is up to 150 feet deep and has colorful hued soil that causes vibrant layers of pink, orange, red and purple. The canyon and surrounding state park are home to rare plumleaf azalea trees that bloom in the summer, making it a top place to still see beautiful blooms after spring has passed.

Hawaii: Waipio Valley (Hawaii)

Hawaii – Waipio Valley
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Waipio Valley on Hawaii's Big Island is one of the most incredible places in the Aloha State. It was once home to Hawaiian royalty, but today is mostly pristine wilderness. The valley is a mile across and about 6 miles deep, and is surrounded by sea cliffs. Hawaii's tallest waterfall, Hiilawe Falls, cascades down 1,300 feet in the back of the valley. Hike past waterfalls and scenic overlooks while exploring this verdant landscape. Make sure your trek takes you past the valley's black-sand beach, one of the coolest colorful beaches in the world.

Idaho: Hells Canyon National Recreation Area

Idaho: Hells Canyon National Recreation Area
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Hells Canyon, located in Hells Canyon National Recreation Area, is 8,000 feet deep, making it the deepest river gorge in North America. It is about 2,000 feet deeper than a far more popular tourist destination, the Grand Canyon. Located on the border of Idaho and Oregon, the area is 650,000 acres of remote, natural playground with ample opportunities for hiking, camping, fishing, horseback riding and more.

Illinois: Garden of the Gods (Shawnee National Forest)

Illinois: Garden of the Gods (Shawnee National Forest)
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Most tourists head to Chicago to enjoy the city's skyscrapers, museums, music and more. But to escape the hustle and bustle of the city and experience the state's natural beauty, head to Shawnee National Forest. The forest's most popular hiking trail is the Garden of the Gods, which features rock formations carved over millions of years as well as a spectacular bird's-eye view across southern Illinois.

Indiana: Fort Wayne

Indiana: Fort Wayne
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Fort Wayne in northeast Indiana is the state's second-largest city, and though it's often overlooked in favor of Indianapolis, it makes for an ideal Midwestern summer getaway. Known for its robust food scene and Hoosier hospitality, Fort Wayne sits on three rivers and has over a hundred miles of hiking and biking trails. The city's minor league baseball field is considered one of the best in the country, and the Genealogy Center has one of the largest physical collections of resources in the world to help you trace your family tree.

Iowa: Effigy Mounds National Monument (Harpers Ferry)

Iowa: Effigy Mounds National Monument (Harpers Ferry)
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When most people think of must-visit American man-made marvels, they often think of the Empire State Building or the Golden Gate Bridge. But one of the most impressive construction projects in American history is located within Iowa's Effigy Mounds National Monument. This site protects 2,500 acres of forested land along the Mississippi River that contain prehistoric Native American burial and ceremonial mounds that date from 500 B.C. to 1300 A.D. The 200-plus amazing animal-shaped mounds are considered sacred by many Native American tribes.

Kansas: Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve

Kansas: Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve
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Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve is the only unit in the U.S. National Park System that is devoted to the country's tallgrass prairie ecosystem, which used to span almost 200 million acres but today is only 4% of its original size. Though there are things to do and see in every season, the fall might be the best because the grasses are at their maximum heights.

Kentucky: The National Corvette Museum (Bowling Green)

Kentucky: The National Corvette Museum (Bowling Green)
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Many people visit Kentucky to try regional dishes like hot brown, travel the Bourbon Trail or tour the famed Churchill Downs track. But one of the best museums in the country for car lovers is the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green. Spend a few hours admiring a collection of more than 80 vintage cars, including rare and one-of-a-kind classics. Tour the Corvette Plant next door and try your hand at a racing simulator. Or you can even take a ride in a 1966 or 2017 Corvette on select days.

Louisiana: Gardens of the American Rose Center (Shreveport)

Louisiana: Gardens of the American Rose Center (Shreveport)
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Tourists who only stick to the museums and landmarks of New Orleans are missing out on amazing attractions in the rest of the state. Shreveport is home to the Gardens of the American Rose Center, which is one of the most romantic places in America. The nation’s largest park dedicated to roses, it has gardens full of 20,000 rose bushes as well as sculptures, fountains, a playground and a picnic area. Mid-April to late May and mid-September to late October are the best times of year to visit to see beautiful blooms.

Maine: Quoddy Head State Park (Lubec)

Maine: Quoddy Head State Park (Lubec)
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Maine's Acadia National Park is famous for having some of the most beautiful sights in any of America's state and national parks. But Quoddy Head State Park includes breathtaking coastlines, whale-watching opportunities, the historic red-and-white-striped West Quoddy Head Lighthouse and one of the best spots to watch the sunrise in the world.

Maryland: Cumberland

Maryland – Cumberland
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Considered "The Gateway to the West" by early American pioneers, Cumberland, Maryland, is known for its historic attractions alongside its arts community. The town is also a fantastic outdoor recreation destination. Nearby Rocky Gap State Park and Green Ridge State Forest offer ample opportunities for hiking, biking, kayaking, fishing and more.

Massachusetts: Cape Ann

Massachusetts – Cape Ann
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Not to be confused with Cape Cod, Cape Ann, located just about 30 miles away from Boston, is an underrated Massachusetts destination. It offers all the charm and loveliness you'd find in more popular New England towns, minus the crowds and for less money. Enjoy sailing, fishing, whale-watching and more in Cape Ann.

Michigan: Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore

Michigan: Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore
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The Sleeping Bear Dunes are among the largest dunes in the country, towering 400 feet above Lake Michigan below. Beyond scaling the dunes, there are miles and miles of trails for hiking and biking. Along with 65 miles of shoreline, there are also numerous lakes and streams to explore by kayak or canoe.

Minnesota: Voyageurs National Park

Minnesota – Voyageurs National Park
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One of the most underrated national parks in the country is Voyageurs National Park, 40% of which is made up of the waters of four different lakes. A maze of interconnected waterways, this park is an ideal place to explore via boat or canoe tour. Along with kayaking and swimming, it's also a great place to hike and camp in the summer and cross-country ski or snowshoe in the winter.

Mississippi: Tunica

Mississippi – Tunica
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The city of Tunica is located off Highway 61, known as the "Blues Highway," which winds through the Mississippi Delta. If you're a music lover, stop by The Gateway to the Blues Visitors Center and Museum before heading to the Mississippi River Museum to learn about the region's history. The city is also known for its casinos, nightlife and golf courses as well as events and concerts.

Missouri: Springfield