skynesher/E+ via Getty Images

Thanksgiving 2020: Activities Ranked by Risk Level, According to the CDC

Thanksgiving 2020: Activities Ranked by Risk Level, According to the CDC

The safest and most high-risk Thanksgiving activities during coronavirus

skynesher/E+ via Getty Images

Believe it or not, Thanksgiving is right around the corner. And while you’re likely looking forward to your favorite potato side dishes and other great holiday recipes, Thanksgiving might look different during the coronavirus pandemic, especially if you’re used to hosting a large get-together. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are some activities that can act as a safe alternative to a traditional big Thanksgiving family dinner. This list ranks your favorite Turkey Day activities by how risky they are: low, moderate or high.

Low-risk activities

Low-risk activities

Thomas Barwick/DigitalVision via Getty Images

There are plenty of safe ways to make sure you get your tryptophan fix this year. According to the CDC, the following activities put you and your loved ones at low risk for contracting the virus this Thanksgiving.

Low-risk: Having a small dinner with members of your household

Having a small dinner with members of your household

skynesher/E+ via Getty Images

While you may not be able to host a large holiday dinner this year, the CDC reports that enjoying a small dinner with the people that live inside your household is a low-risk activity.

Low-risk: Dropping off recipes for loved ones

Dropping off recipes for loved ones

SolStock/E+ via Getty Images

One small act of kindness you can do during the coronavirus pandemic and Thanksgiving is drop off food for a loved one or neighbor. As long as it’s a no-contact drop-off, it’s considered low risk by the CDC.

Low-risk: Having a virtual dinner

Having a virtual dinner

kohei_hara/E+ via Getty Images

Video chatting with friends and family is a great way to stay connected during the coronavirus pandemic, especially during the holidays. This Thanksgiving, cook the same dishes as your family and host a virtual dinner, it’s been deemed a safe activity by the CDC.

Low-risk: Shopping online

Shopping online

kohei_hara/E+ via Getty Images

Sure, Thanksgiving is a time to make all of your favorite casseroles and stuffing recipes, but it’s also a notable holiday for shopping. Instead of hitting the mall for Black Friday this year, the CDC recommends online shopping.

Low-risk: Watching sporting events from home

Watching sporting events from home

RyanJLane/E+ via Getty Images

Rather than watching football from the stands this year, the CDC suggests that you tune in from home. The low-risk activity can still be enjoyable, especially if your table is filled with delicious game day recipes.

Moderate-risk activities

Moderate-risk activities

SolStock/E+ via Getty Images

While most low-risk activities involve staying home with members of your household for Thanksgiving, the following activities open things up a bit. According to the CDC, these activities will put you at moderate risk for contracting the virus.

Moderate-risk: Having a small outdoor dinner party

Having a small outdoor dinner

PeopleImages/E+ via Getty Images

If the weather permits, the CDC reports that hosting a small outdoor dinner party puts you at moderate risk for contracting coronavirus during Thanksgiving.

Moderate-risk: Visiting a pumpkin patch

Visiting a pumpkin patch

Juanmonino/E+ via Getty Images

If you’re visiting your favorite pumpkin patches or apple orchards this Thanksgiving, it’s considered a moderate risk as long as people are using hand sanitizer before touching anything, wearing face masks and social distancing.

Moderate-risk: Attending a small outdoor sports event

Attending a small outdoor sports event

Lorado/E+ via Getty Images

If making stadium food at home just doesn’t cut it, the CDC reports that attending a small outdoor sports event poses a moderate risk to you for catching the virus, so long as safety precautions are in place.

Higher-risk activities

Higher-risk activities

skynesher/E+ via Getty Images

According to the CDC, you should avoid these activities this Thanksgiving to mitigate the risk of spreading the coronavirus.

Higher-risk: Going shopping in crowded stores

Going shopping in crowded stores

ThitareeSarmkasat/iStock via Getty Images Plus

There are plenty of ways to have a socially distanced fall season, but going shopping in crowded stores isn’t one of them. The CDC considers that to be a high-risk activity.

Higher-risk: Attending a crowded race

Attending a crowded race

FatCamera/E+ via Getty Images

Running a 5K on Thanksgiving morning is a tradition for many families, but similar to attending a crowded football game or store, the CDC recommends avoiding crowded races. The activity is considered high risk.

Higher-risk: Attending a crowded parade

Attending a crowded parade

NYC Russ/Shutterstock

Although the Macy’s Day parade is an American tradition, the CDC reports that attending a crowded parade of any kind will put you at high risk for contracting the coronavirus.

Higher-risk: Using drugs or alcohol

Using drugs or alcohol

alvarez/E+ via Getty Images

Pumpkin-flavored cocktails are a joy come Thanksgiving, but despite this fact, the CDC considers engaging with drugs or alcohol during the holidays to be a high-risk activity, as it can cloud judgment.

Higher-risk: Attending large indoor gatherings

Attending large indoor gatherings

SeventyFour/Shutterstock

Thanksgiving is a time to surround yourself with family and friends, but unfortunately, during the coronavirus pandemic, attending a large indoor gathering is considered a high-risk activity. If your loved ones are putting pressure on you to visit, follow this helpful guide for how to talk to friends and family about attending holiday gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic.

More from The Active Times:

Pumpkin Carving Tips for Fun Fall Days

How to Make a Succulent Pumpkin Centerpiece

Fall Foliage Photos from America’s National Parks

How to Help a Child With Separation Anxiety

Scenic Beginner Hiking Trails in America's National Parks