Fitness World Records

Fitness World Records

Wikicommons/Borutstrel

Martin Strel (pictured) claimed the record for longest swimming journey with a 3,273.38-mile trip down the entire length of the Amazon River. He began on February 1, 2007, in Atalaya, Peru, and finished 67 days later on April 8 in Belem, Brazil. On his shortest day, Strel swam less than six miles. On his longest day, he swam almost 80. The feat was made even more incredible by the number of dangers in the Amazon River, including crocodiles, debris, piranhas and electric eels.

andyboltonstrength.org

Andy Bolton (pictured), an English powerlifter and strong man, completed the heaviest two-arm deadlift with 1,003 poundspretty much like lifting a horseat the WPO Semi-Finals in Lake George, New York, on November 4, 2006.

Alexandra Daly-Clark/theworldjog.com

We've nominated this feat as the most boring world record on our list. In the 48 hours from August 22-24 in 2008, Irishman Tony Mangan (pictured) traveled a total of 251.79 miles on a treadmill at St. Mels College in Longford, Ireland, where we hope there was satellite TV and multitudes of pretty cheerleaders rooting him on. Currently, he's three years into a much more scenic four-year, 30,000-mile jog around the world.

Shutterstock

Stephen Hyland completed the most pull-ups in a day on July 23, 2011. He finished 4,020 reps at his personal gym in Stoneleigh, England, in just 12 hours in order to qualify for the title. That day, he also set the record for the most pull-ups in six hours (3,288).

 

Shutterstock

Seventy-year-old Lee Chin-Yong performed 612 chin-ups at Jongmyo Park, Seoul, South Korea on December 29, 1994. The feat took him two hours and 40 minutes.

Shutterstock

While Lance Armstrong (pictured) might have lost his Tour de France titles for doping, he kept his Guinness World Record. In the 2005 tour, Armstrong claimed the title for fastest average speed at 25.882 mph over the 2,241-mile course. His incredible performance landed him in the top spot on the race's final podium, for his seventh straight win.

Shutterstock

In 2010, Italian Enzo Caporaso ran seven 100-kilometer ultramarathons in seven consecutive days between June 13 and 19. The races all began in Turin, Italy. Caporaso finished the first ultra in 11 hours, 28 minutes, 43 seconds and his last in 19 hours, 23 minutes and 11 seconds. So much for negative splits.

Shutterstock

On October 10, 2011, Australian Neil Bryant completed 50 push-ups in one minute while wearing a weighted backpack. Bryant needed to beat the number set by Britain’s Paddy Doyle, who already had 170 Guinness World Records to his name.

Flickr/Jose Goulao

When Usain Bolt (pictured) crushed his competition to claim gold in the Beijing Olympics’ 100-meter event, the world watched with awe. Just a year later, however, he lowered the time further from 9.69 to 9.58 seconds—topping out at a blazing fast 27.79 mph—at the World Championships in Berlin, Germany.

phased.co.uk

Unlike the other records in this slideshow, this feat has gone untouched for decades. In 1939, Briton Thomas Godwin (pictured) cycled 75,065 miles—an average of about 205 miles each day—on a four-gear steel bike weighing more than 30 pounds. When the year was over, Godwin continued cycling and went on to log a total of 100,000 miles in 500 days, ending on May 14, 1940.

Shutterstock

For the average person, holding an abdominal plank for just a minute is a challenge. For George Hood of Aurora, Illinois, however, this is just part of the warm-up. On April 20, 2013, a 53-year-old Hood held plank position for three hours, seven minutes and 15 seconds in Newport, Kentucky. His record attempt helped raise money for the American Heart Foundation. You can see a video of the feat here, and don't worry—it's not the whole three hours.

Shutterstock

Kurtis Loftus surfed for 29 hours, 1 minute at Jacksonville Beach, Florida. While he said it was “a neat thing to tell friends and family,” Loftus’ primary reason for surfing was to raise $20,000 for the event 26.2 With Donna: The National Marathon to Finish Breast Cancer, according to The Florida Times-Union. He succeeded in this goal.

Shutterstock

It's a good thing Charles Servizio wasn't all that great at wrestling. His high school coach made him do push-ups as punishment for bad tournament performance. He kept on doing them and, more than 20 years later, in 1993, he set the world record when he did an incredible 46,001 push-ups in 24 hours. He was 42 at the time.

veljkorogosic.org

From August 29-31, 2006, Croatian long-distance swimmer Veljko Rogosic (pictured) completed a 139.8-mile swim from Grado, Italy to Riccione, Italy. Rogosic, a former Olympian for Yugoslavia, completed the journey in 50 hours and 10 minutes. His distance was tracked by GPS. Afterwards, he's rumored to have slept a lot.

Shutterstock

The muscle-up, a popular exercise used in CrossFit, is a pull-up with a maximum range of motion. You begin in a hanging position, pull yourself into a dip and then push up until your arms are extended. Still not clear? Click here for a video.

On January 4, 2010, Australian Jarryd Rubinstein completed 25 consecutive muscle ups in Sydney, beating the previous world record of 15. In an interview with The Jewish Chronicle Online, Rubinstein said he learned to stay fit while serving for three years in the Israel Defense Forces.