State restrictions

SERGIO FLORES/AFP via Getty Images

States Ranked From the Fewest Coronavirus Restrictions to the Most

States Ranked From the Fewest Coronavirus Restrictions to the Most

Based on stay-at-home orders, face mask requirements and more
State restrictions

SERGIO FLORES/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus has upended lives across the United States and around the world. Now months into the global pandemic, social distancing restrictions still vary from state to state as some are starting to slowly reopen. Did you feel like, during the pandemic, your state was more restrictive than most? Using nine metrics, WalletHub and a team of experts ranked where all 50 states and Washington, D.C. stood before May 5 from least to most restrictive.

Methodology

Methodology

Tyler Davis/ Tribune Content Agency 

To rank the states’ coronavirus restrictions, WalletHub compared them all across nine metrics. Relevant metrics included face mask requirements in public, travel restrictions, large gatherings restrictions, statewide school closures, reopening of restaurants and bars and other social distancing measures. States earned points based on to what degree they had or had not implemented the designated restriction with 100 points representing the fewest restrictions. Some metrics, like restaurant reopening and issuance of a shelter-in-place order, were given higher weight than others like postponement of legislative sessions. The overall scores, based on data available on May 4, were then used to compile this ranking from least to most restrictive.

51. South Dakota

51. South Dakota

KEREM YUCEL/AFP via Getty Images

South Dakota earned a score of 89.23 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. The state has yet to fully implement a stay-at-home order, severe travel restrictions or non-essential business closures. Educational facilities closed on March 16. According to Governor Kristi Noem’s “Back To Normal Plan,” remote learning will continue with the possibility of end-of-the-year in-person check-ins.

50. Utah

50. Utah

George Frey/Getty Images

Utah earned a score of 73.85 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Utah closed education facilities on March 16 and implemented gathering restrictions and business closures on March 19. Governor Gary R. Herbert has yet to fully implement a stay-at-home order or severe travel restrictions. The state currently advises residents to keep gatherings under 20 people, leave home infrequently and wear face coverings in public settings.

49. North Dakota

49. North Dakota

Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

North Dakota earned a score of 70.77 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. The state closed educational facilities March 16 and ordered the shuttering of some businesses on March 20. North Dakota has yet to fully institute a stay-at-home order or restrict social gathering and travel.

48. Missouri

 48. Missouri

Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Missouri earned a score of 67.95 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Missouri Governor Michael Parson lifted the state’s stay-at-home order on May 4, just under a month after it had been placed on April 6. Along with the lifted order, businesses reopened and gathering restrictions were loosened.

47. Idaho

47. Idaho

Cindy Ord/Getty Images

Idaho earned a score of 67.69 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. The state’s stay-at-home order implemented on March 25 expired May 1. Idaho has now instituted stage one of its planned recovery. Citizens are still encouraged to avoid public and private gatherings. Non-essential businesses may begin phasing employees back into work following physical distancing measures. However, restaurant dining rooms and bars remain closed while a reopening plan is developed.

46. Tennessee

46. Tennessee

Jason Kempin/Getty Images

Tennessee earned a score of 66.67 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Governor Bill Lee instituted a stay-at-home order on April 2. Four weeks later, on April 29, the order expired. Restaurants reopened at 50% capacity with 6 feet between guests. Gyms and other non-essential businesses reopened as well.

45. Montana

45. Montana

Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Montana earned a score of 65.64 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. The state’s stay-at-home order began March 26 and ended April 26. Non-essential businesses reopened a day later under new state protocol. On May 4, restaurants, bars, casinos and more reopened under physical distancing and reduced capacity protocols.

44. Texas

44. Texas

MARK FELIX/AFP /AFP via Getty Images

Texas earned a score of 63.08 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. The state instituted a stay-at-home order on April 2 that ended May 1. Texas Governor Greg Abbott announced phase one of reopening Texas effective May 1, allowing for all retail stores, restaurants, movie theaters and malls to reopen at 25% capacity. 

43. Florida

43. Florida

Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

Florida earned a score of 62.05 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Educational facilities and some non-essential businesses began closing in Florida on March 17. A stay-at-home order instituted on April 3 ended May 4. The first of three recovery phases outlined by Governor Ron DeSantis allows for restaurants and food establishments to open if in accordance with social distancing practices and keeping occupancy under 25%.

42. Iowa

42. Iowa

SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Iowa earned a score of 56.54 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds never fully implemented a stay-at-home order or travel limitations. Some non-essential businesses, closed since March 17, reopened May 1 with new guidelines. Restaurants, for example, must limit occupancy to 50%. Schools, closed since April 4, will remain closed through the remainder of the school year. 

41. Georgia

41. Georgia

Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Georgia earned a score of 52.82 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. The state closed schools on March 18 and restricted mass gatherings on March 24. A statewide stay-at-home order was implemented on April 3 and expired May 1. On April 24, Georgia allowed gyms, fitness centers, bowling alleys, body art studios, barbers, cosmetologists, hair designers, nail care artists, estheticians and massage therapists to reopen.

40. Arkansas

40. Arkansas

Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Arkansas earned a score of 52.69 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Arkansas has yet to implement a stay-at-home order. Some but not all non-essential businesses have closed. Although this study is based on data available May 4, effective May 11, Arkansas restaurants may resume dine-in services at 33% capacity.

39. Kansas

39. Kansas

Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Kansas earned a score of 51.28 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Kansas did not fully implement business closures even for non-essential businesses or set travel restrictions. A stay-at-home order implemented March 30 ended May 4.

38. Nebraska

38. Nebraska

BRAD LEE/AFP via Getty Images

Nebraska earned a score of 50.39 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Nebraska has yet to fully implement a stay-at-home order. Social gatherings have been restricted since March 16 and some businesses have been closed since March 19.

37. Oklahoma

37. Oklahoma

JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images

Oklahoma earned a score of 50 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Non-essential businesses in Oklahoma closed April 1. Personal care businesses and state parks reopened April 24 and dining, entertainment and sports venues, gyms and places of worship reopened May 1. All reopened facilities must follow CDC-recommended social distancing guidelines.

36. Indiana

36. Indiana

BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP via Getty Images

Indiana earned a score of 49.74 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Indiana ordered a stay-at-home order on March 25 that expired May 4. Also on May 4, the state entered Governor Eric Holcomb’s stage two of recovery. Social gatherings under 25 people may now be held in all Indiana counties but three. Face masks are recommended and non-essential local travel may resume. Retail and commercial businesses may reopen at 50% capacity.

35. South Carolina

35. South Carolina

Sean Rayford/Getty Images

South Carolina earned a score of 47.69 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. South Carolina schools closed March 16, with social gatherings restricted and businesses closing on March 18. Governor Henry McMaster instituted a stay-at-home order on April 7 that ended May 4. 

34. Wyoming

34. Wyoming

DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images

Wyoming earned a score of 47.18 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Educational facilities and some businesses in the state closed on March 19 and the state government restricted social gatherings a day later. Governor Mark Gordon has yet to fully institute a stay-at-home order or shutter all non-essential businesses.

33. Mississippi

33. Mississippi

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Mississippi earned a score of 46.67 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Non-essential businesses in Mississippi were closed from April 3 to April 27 as part of a statewide stay-at-home order. Schools were closed statewide on March 19 and will remain closed through the remainder of the school year.

32. Alabama

32. Alabama

SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Alabama earned a score of 46.41 on the WalletHub 100 point scale. Non-essential businesses in the state closed March 28 and a stay-at-home order followed on April 4. The stay-at-home order expired April 30 and a safer-at-home order is now in effect until May 22. All retail stores may reopen at 50% capacity and restaurants are still limited to curbside pickup, delivery and takeout.

T-30. Alaska

T-30. Alaska

BRAD LEE/AFP via Getty Images

Alaska earned a score of 44.62 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Schools in Alaska closed on March 16 and some businesses closed March 17. A stay-at-home order implemented on March 28 shuttered all non-essential businesses and severely limited travel until April 24. A new statewide mandate was implemented that day, allowing for non-essential businesses to reopen under new requirements.

T-30. Minnesota

T-30. Minnesota

SEBASTIEN DUVAL/AFP via Getty Images

Like Alaska, Minnesota also earned a score of 44.62 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. A statewide stay-at-home order was implemented in Minnesota on March 28. On May 1, Governor Tim Walz extended the order through May 17. Under the stay-at-home order, businesses and educational facilities remain closed and social gatherings are restricted.

29. West Virginia

29. West Virginia

Patrick Smith/Getty Images

West Virginia earned a score of 41.03 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. West Virginia closed non-essential businesses on March 24 and implemented a stay-at-home order the next day. Although the order remains in effect, outdoor dining at restaurants was allowed to resume May 4.

28. Kentucky

28. Kentucky

Andy Lyons/Getty Images

Kentucky earned a score of 37.95 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. The state has yet to fully implement a stay-at-home order, however, non-essential businesses closed on March 26, but began reopening May 11 with industry-specific requirements.

27. Nevada

27. Nevada

DAVID BECKER/AFP via Getty Images

Nevada earned a score of 37.56 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak issued a statewide stay-at-home order on March 31. Although the order remains in effect through May 15, some non-essential businesses were permitted to reopen May 1. On April 27, Nevada and Colorado joined the Western States Pact already made up of California, Oregon and Washington.

26. Maine

26. Maine

Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images

Maine earned a score of 35.39 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. A statewide stay-at-home order was issued on April 2. Governor Janet Mills implemented stage one of her “Restarting Maine” plan May 1, permitting openings for drive-in theatres, some personal services and other retail establishments, and loosening restrictions on outdoor recreation.

25. Virginia

25. Virginia

OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

Virginia earned a score of 34.49 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. A statewide stay-at-home order was instituted in Virginia on March 30. On May 4, Governor Ralph Northam extended the order through at least May 14 and announced a phased plan to later ease restrictions on businesses and gatherings.

24. North Carolina

24. North Carolina

Jenny Evans/Getty Images

North Carolina earned a score of 34.36 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. North Carolina also instituted a temporary stay-at-home order and closed all non-essential businesses on March 30 after already closing schools and restricting social gatherings. Although the WalletHub ranking is based on data available May 4, a new modified stay-at-home order instituted on May 8 removed the distinction between essential and non-essential businesses, allowing many retail businesses to reopen at 50% capacity following social distancing guidelines.

23. California

23. California

David McNew/Getty Images

California earned a score of 33.08 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. California restricted social gatherings on March 11. Educational facilities and non-essential businesses closed March 19 as the state’s stay-at-home order took effect. Although the WalletHub ranking is based on data available May 4, California businesses such as clothing stores, florists, bookstores, manufacturers and warehouses began reopening May 8 with modifications and some with curbside pickup.

22. Oregon

22. Oregon

Terray Sylvester/Getty Images

Oregon earned a score of 32.82 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. The state restricted social gatherings on March 12, closed schools March 16 and began business closures March 17. On March 23, a stay-at-home order was instituted. Some Oregon counties may be eligible for reopening of additional business sectors and gatherings of under 25 people as early as May 15 should they meet the state’s mandated requirements.

21. New Hampshire

21. New Hampshire

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

New Hampshire earned a score of 32.44 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. New Hampshire implemented a stay-at-home order on March 27 and closed all non-essential businesses a day later. Although the WalletHub ranking is based on data available May 4, non-essential services like salons, barbershops, drive-in theatres and other retail reopened on May 11 under industry-specific social-distancing guidelines. Outdoor dining will resume at restaurants on May 18.

20. Arizona

20. Arizona

Shawn Thew - Pool/Getty Images

Arizona earned a score of 31.80 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. The state closed schools on March 16 and social gatherings were restricted on March 30 as a statewide stay-at-home order went into effect. Although the WalletHub ranking is based on data available May 4, barbershops and salons were allowed to resume services on May 8 and dine-in services resumed May 11 so long as they align with the required safety protocols.

19. Colorado

19. Colorado

Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Colorado earned a score of 29.74 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. A statewide stay-at-home order went into effect March 26 and expired April 27. After the stay-at-home order, a safer-at-home order was implemented allowing for curbside retail and real estate showing. On May 1, retail and personal services opened under new best practices. On May 4, non-critical offices were opened at lower density.

18. Wisconsin

18. Wisconsin

Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Wisconsin earned a score of 28.59 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. On March 25, Governor Tony Evers implemented a safer-at-home order requiring all individuals in the state of Wisconsin to stay home. On April 24, the original order was extended until May 26 with some changes. Non-essential businesses were allowed to resume minimum basic operations such as deliveries and curbside pickup.

17. New Mexico

17. New Mexico

PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images

New Mexico earned a score of 28.21 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. On March 11, Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham issued a state of public health emergency via executive order. Effective March 24, all non-essential businesses were ordered to close and residents were advised to stay home. Grisham’s original executive order was modified and extended to May 15. The updated order allowed for non-essential businesses to reopen May 1.

16. Louisiana

16. Louisiana

CLAIRE BANGSER/AFP via Getty Images

Louisiana earned a score of 25.90 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. A statewide stay-at-home order was instituted on March 23. On April 27, Governor John Bel Edwards extended the order until May 15. The extended order allowed stores to reopen for curbside pickup, restaurants to open outdoor dining without tableside service and required employees of any business making contact with the public to wear a mask.

15. Washington

15. Washington

Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Washington earned a score of 25.64 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Non-essential businesses in Washington closed on March 25, two days after the state’s stay-at-home order took full effect. While the stay-at-home order has been extended to May 31,  Governor Jay Inslee authorized the partial reopening of certain recreational activities beginning May 5.

14. Michigan

14. Michigan

SETH HERALD/AFP via Getty Images

Michigan earned a score of 24.1 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Schools in Michigan closed statewide on March 16, three days after restrictions on social gatherings began. A stay-at-home order was instituted on March 24 and extended to May 28. Although the WalletHub ranking is based on data available May 4, manufacturing workers resumed work in the state on May 11.

13. Vermont

13. Vermont

Al Bello/Getty Images

Vermont earned a score of 23.08 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Vermont shuttered non-essential businesses on March 25, a day after a statewide stay-at-home order took effect. On April 20, some non-essential businesses, such as construction operations of two people or fewer and professional services like appraisers, realtors and attorneys, were allowed to reopen.

12. Maryland

12. Maryland

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Maryland earned a score of 22.18 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Some businesses and all schools in Maryland closed on March 16 as gathering restrictions took full effect. On March 30, Governor Larry Hogan implemented a stay-at-home order. Effective April 18, all customers over the age of 9, commuters and retail and food establishment employees were required to wear masks.

11. Delaware

11. Delaware

ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images

Delaware earned a score of 21.54 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Like in Maryland, some Delaware businesses and all schools closed on March 16 as gathering restrictions took full effect. Governor John Carney instituted a stay-at-home order on March 24. Although the WalletHub ranking is based on data available May 4, effective May 8, some small businesses like hairdressers and retail shops will reopen.

10. Connecticut

10. Connecticut

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Connecticut earned a score of 21.41 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. On March 20, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont announced a “Stay Safe, Stay Home” order effective March 23. On April 10, the order was extended until at least May 20. An April 17 order now requires any person over the age of 2 who cannot maintain 6 feet of distance between others to wear a face mask. Social gatherings of more than five people are prohibited.

9. Ohio

9. Ohio

MEGAN JELINGER//AFP via Getty Images

Ohio earned a score of 20.13 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. A statewide stay-at-home order was put into effect on March 23, closing all non-essential businesses. Manufacturing, distribution, construction industries and office environments were authorized to reopen May 4 under new guidelines, but gatherings of more than 10 people remain prohibited. 

8. Massachusetts

8. Massachusetts

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Massachusetts earned a score of 19.62 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. On March 23, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker issued an “Essential Services and Revised Gatherings” order closing non-essential businesses and prohibiting gatherings of more than 10 people. The order has been extended until May 18. On May 1, Baker issued an order requiring the use of face coverings in public when social distancing measures cannot be maintained.

7. New York

7. New York

JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images

New York earned a score of 17.95 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Social gatherings in New York were first restricted on March 12. Businesses began closing on March 16 and schools on March 18. On March 22, Governor Andrew Cuomo’s “New York State on PAUSE” stay-at-home order shut down all non-essential businesses. Non-essential businesses will remain closed through May 15. An order requiring residents wear to face masks in public went into effect April 17.

6. New Jersey

6. New Jersey

Mark Makela/Getty Images

New Jersey earned a score of 17.44 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Schools in the state closed on March 18 and will remain closed for the remainder of the school year. Governor Phil Murphy instituted a stay-at-home order on March 21 that will remain in effect until further notice. Residents are required to wear face masks in public.

5. Pennsylvania

5. Pennsylvania

BRANDEN EASTWOOD/AFP via Getty Images

Pennsylvania earned a score of 16.03 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. All non-essential businesses in the state closed on March 23 and a stay-at-home order went into effect April 1. An order requiring residents wear face coverings in public went into effect April 19. Although the WalletHub ranking is based on data available May 4, beginning May 8, two dozen counties began Governor Tom Wolf’s yellow phase of reopening while the rest of the state remains in the red phase with the stay-at-home order extended until June 4. 

4. Illinois

4. Illinois

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Illinois earned a score of 12.82 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. A stay-at-home order from Governor J.B. Pritzker went into effect March 21 and has been extended through May. Under the extended order starting May 1, face coverings are required in public for all residents over 2 years of age. Also under the updated order, non-essential businesses may reopen for the purpose of minimum basic operations.

3. Washington D.C.

3. Washington D.C.

Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Washington, D.C. earned a score of 11.28 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. Mayor Muriel Bowser instituted a stay-at-home order in Washington, D.C. effective March 30. On April 15, the order was extended to May 15 and updated to require the use of face masks for workers and customers at food sellers, hotels and in taxis and rideshare services.

2. Rhode Island

2. Rhode Island

JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

Rhode Island earned a score of 10.26 on the WalletHub 100-point scale. A stay-at-home order went into effect statewide on March 28 and extended until May 8. Under the order, gatherings of more than five people were banned and an April 14 order from Governor Gina Raimondo required the use of face masks by all essential employees. The order implored customer-facing businesses to take steps to require customers to wear face masks. 

1. Hawaii

1. Hawaii

Mario Tama/Getty Images

Hawaii earned a score of 6.15 on the WalletHub 100-point scale, the most restrictive in the country. Hawaii Governor David Ige instituted a stay-at-home order on March 25 that has since been extended through May 31. On April 16, Ige updated the order to include measures on face masks in public and closing all state beaches. Although the WalletHub ranking is based on data available May 4, certain non-essential businesses in Hawaii were allowed to reopen May 7 while gatherings of more than 10 people remain banned. Now that you know the rules of each state, here's how well residents have scored at social distancing.

More From The Active Times

Is Social Distancing Working in the US? How Successful Each State Has Been 

CDC-Approved Cleaning Products: Keep Your Home Sanitized From Carpet to Countertop

When Each State Could Consider Easing Coronavirus Social Distancing, According to Study 

Working From Home Tips: Establishing a Routine During Coronavirus Quarantine 

How to Care for Someone at Home Who Has Coronavirus