Quebrada Cliff, Acapulco, Mexico from The World’s Scariest Cliff Dives

The World’s Scariest Cliff Dives

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Photo Modified: Flickr / Jorge Nava / CC BY-SA 4.0

Quebrada Cliff, Acapulco, Mexico

If you’re looking for something scary, how about diving off of this 100 foot jagged rock face then crashing into the water below and submerging yourself 6 to 16 feet underground? If that’s not scary, we don’t know what is! This is why, the Quebrada Cliff is more of a tourist attraction, rather than a recreational dive. Acapulco cliff divers are courageous, entertaining and dramatic — and they put on a great show!

Tar Creek Falls, California

Tar Creek Falls is located in Los Padres National Forest. Cliff divers are in for a treat because there is a 70-foot cliff ready for them to take on. Along with the famous 70-foot cliff are drops ranging between 10-25 feet. The best time to visit is during the spring when the pools are safe and ready for diving.

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South Point Cliffs, The Big Island, Hawaii

Get away from the crowded cliff and experience the power of the South Point Cliffs. Ladders are connected to old boat hoists which makes the waters accessible for cliff jumpers. You may want to stay out of the water on days with strong currents, swimmers will have a difficult time and the powerful winds can easily threaten your life.

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Kaunolu, Hawaii

Kaunolu, Hawaii, is home to the sacred Kahekili’s Leap. Cliff jumpers dive from the top of the cliff at 70 feet, clear rocks on the way down then land in just 10 feet of water. History says that this spot was used to test the courage of warriors. Fun Fact: The 2000 Red Bull Cliff Diving Championships were held in Kaunolu.

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Polignano a Mare, Italy

Polignano a Mare was the home of the 2015 Red Bull Cliff Diving Championships. Get ready to admire the bravery and skill of some of the world’s best cliff divers again, as the Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series is returning August 28, 2016.

Photo Modified: Flickr / Kim / CC BY-SA 4.0

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Be careful cliff diving at Buza, one of Dubrovnik’s scariest jumps. What makes it so scary? “The sea in front of Buza can get pretty choppy from time to time due to high winds and boats” (Pause The Moment). That being said, your cliff dive can easily turn into a dangerous experience as you struggle to swim your way out of the sea.

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Mazatlan, Mexico

Many people are aware of the Quebrada Cliff in Acupulco, but did you know Mazatlan has its own diving traditions? Mazaltan cliff divers jump several times a day. They time their jumps perfectly as they leap from high platforms into water that is just a few feet deep. To view the spectacular performance, head to the cliff around noon.

Photo Modified: Flickr / Irene Grassi / CC BY-SA 4.0

Ponte Brolla, Switzerland

Ponte Brolla is a village in Switzerland with cliffs over 30 meters high above the water. It is home to the World High Diving Federation (WHDF) Cliff-Diving World Tour, where some of the best athletes perform twists and summersaults in the air as they leap. Fun Fact: According to adrex.com, “World High Diving Federation is an autonomous federation of Cliff and High Diving sport with headquarters in Avegno, Switzerland.”

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Algarve, Portugal

Cliff jumping in Algarve may possibly one of the most thrilling and scary experiences of your life. Jump off cliffs, swim in the ocean and through caves. But beware of the rock formations and unknown waters. The speed you build up before hitting the water can cause serious injury.

Photo Modified: Flickr / Richard / CC BY-SA 4.0

Havasu Falls, Arizona

Make sure you are properly trained before attempting Havasu Falls. The falls feature a 125-foot drop and the water isn’t deep in some areas which can lead to serious injury. Not to mention that emergency services are far away and if you get hurt, it can be hours until someone comes to your aid. The alternative: Try waterfall jumping.

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Tally Lake, Montana

Talley Lake is located in Flathead National Forest. They have a variety of cliffs, including a 100-foot drop that ends with a hard crash into the lake below. The pressure from the fall can lead to serious injuries, so be careful because you are literally risking your life with this one.

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Possum Kingdom, Texas

Get ready for the dive of your life as you leap into a 55 mph free fall of Hell’s Gate. It was home to the Cliff Diving World Serious competition in 2014. The dive is so secluded, spectators can only view the competition from kayak, personal watercraft, boat, or stand up paddleboard.

Photo Modified: Flickr / Mike Milinkovich / CC BY-SA 4.0

Lake Powell, Utah

Cliff jumping has been prohibited in Lake Powell, this could possibly be due to the amount of fatalities that have occurred. If you want to dive, you must do so off of your boat, but it is still advised to proceed with caution.

Photo Modified: Flickr / Kyle Taylor / CC BY 4.0

The Kimberley, Australia

Kimberley, Australia has a variety of cliff diving opportunities. It is advised only organized cliff dives should take on this leap. It has steep-sided mountain ranges and is difficult to negotiate, which is why amateur cliff jumpers are at serious risk for injury.

Photo Modified: Flickr / Hernan Irastorza / CC BY 4.0

Phi Phi Don, Krabi, Thailand

Although scary, the limestone cliffs on Phi Phi Island are sure to get you adrenaline seekers pumped. There are a variety of different cliffs to choose from, the tallest is the 20-meter leap into the briny. If you’re brave enough, take your chances, but it is strongly advised to jump with an organized tour.

The World’s Scariest Cliff Dives