1. Bad breath from Unexpected Ways to Know If You Have Health Problems

Unexpected Ways to Know If You Have Health Problems

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1. Bad breath

Saliva has many anti-bacterial properties and studies have shown that licking wounds make scientific sense because it is a natural antiseptic. However, if you don’t have enough liquids in your body that are necessary for it to function properly, then it won’t be producing enough saliva. That can result in a lot of bacteria growing in your mouth, causing bad breath.

 

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2. Geographic tongue

Have you notice dry white lines in a strange formation on your tongue? This is known as the “geographic tongue” because the lines look like an outline of a map and it can be an indication that you have Celiac disease – your body can’t process gluten. This sign usually comes with more common symptoms such as tiredness, significant and quick weight loss, and diarrhea.

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3. Food cravings, mostly for sweets

Do you all of a sudden want to eat lots of candy? This can be another symptom of dehydration. Your body doesn’t have enough water to release glycogens which serve as a form of energy storage and so you get cravings. If that happens to you, don’t go for sweet stuff but go to the fruits section because they have high water content. Watermelon is a perfect choice. Eating 100 grams of sugar (about three cans of soda) significantly impedes the capability of white blood cells to kill bacteria. Test yourself.

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4. You Get Exhausted Easily

Feeling tired after an hour at the gym is normal. But feeling like you’re going to pass out after carrying groceries or climbing two flights of stairs to get to your office is not. Unexplained fatigue and paleness can be a sign of a heart attack. Persistent tiredness can also be a symptom for acute liver failure or cancer.

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5. Never-ending hiccups

Hiccups usually come and go, right? If that’s the case, you have nothing to worry about. But if no matter what you do you can’t get rid of them, check with your doctor. Any irritant – physical/chemical factors, inflammation – invading the arc leads to hiccups. Constant hiccups can be a symptom of lung cancer or a stroke, according to a study. Other causes include space occupying lesions, such as tumors, myocardial ischemia, or herpes infection.

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6. A craving for ice

This is a strange one. If you feel like you need to have some ice chips, you may have anemia – your body doesn’t have enough red blood cells to carry oxygen to your tissues – due to iron deficiency. Chewing things that have no nutritional value is called “pica.” You want ice possibly because your tongue hurts or is swollen because of the anemia.

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7. Dry nose

A runny nose when you have a cold is a good sing. It’s the body natural defense system against the virus because the mucus traps it. That won’t happen if your nasal passages are dry. Germs are unrestricted and can enter your body uninterrupted. Dry nose is often a sign of allergies. It is also associated with several medical conditions, including Sjögren’s syndrome, autoimmune disease that causes decreased production of tears and saliva.

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8. Swollen or bleeding gums

Any doctor will tell you that your gums are closely related to the health of your heart. The same bacteria can be found in both organs. If you have a periodontal problem, it may be a symptom of a heart disease, the leading cause of death in the U.S. Problems with your gums can lead to bacteria entering the bloodstream sticking to the heart blood vessels. This can result in blood clots and eventually a heart attack.

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9. Concentration issues / Problems with work

This is a classic symptom of clinical depression (and a typically overlooked one). If you take hours to perform simple tasks at work that regularly take you 20 minutes, you may be more than simply tired or in need of some sleep. If you can’t express your thoughts articulately – if that’s not usually the case – you may actually be depressed and not know it. This medical condition can seriously affect you everyday life.

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10. Vision problems

Don’t underestimate the causes of why you can’t read the subtitles in your TV screen. Eye problems can significantly obstruct as instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) – such as grocery shopping, doing housework, walking alone, etc. Moreover, vision loss can be an early sign of blindness which is one of the common effects of diabetes, according to the National Institutes of Health. High blood levels can cause blurred vision. A study from two years ago suggested that an exam where the back of the eye is photographed helps determine which high blood pressure patients are at highest stroke risk.

Unexpected Ways to Know If You Have Health Problems