Scary Things That Happen When You Don’t Wear Sunscreen from Scary Things That Happen When You Don’t Wear Sunscreen

Scary Things That Happen When You Don’t Wear Sunscreen

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Scary Things That Happen When You Don’t Wear Sunscreen
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Scary Things That Happen When You Don’t Wear Sunscreen

Ask almost any dermatologist and they’ll tell you that the best type of sunscreen is one that you’ll use consistently every day and that the best wat to protect your skin is to use lotion. Properly protecting your skin from the sun includes applying it to exposed areas every time you step outside. Too many people commonly believe their skin is safe on a cloudy day. But this misconception can lead to serious skin problems.

Premature aging
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Premature aging

Dermatologists recommend to patient to wear sunscreen all the time. “90 percent of premature skin aging is caused by overexposure,” Dr. Elizabeth Hale, from the Skin Cancer Foundation says. Everyone gets incidental exposures of sun that in some cases can cause sunburn and significant skin damage. Wearing sunscreen on a regular basis can help prevent this. Harmful UV rays penetrate clouds and get to your skin if it’s not protected.

Skin damage
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Skin damage

Whether the damage is irreversible is still disputed, but no dermatologists argue that too much sun causes hurts the skin. Sun explore leads to changes in the collagen of a deep layer of the skin because of the UV radiation.

Genetically changed skin cells
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Genetically changed skin cells

Sunlight-induced DNA damage is considered to be the main cause for the genetic changes responsible for skin lesions and carcinogenesis, according to research. If enough DNA damage builds up over time, it can cause cells to start growing out of control, which can lead to skin cancer. Sun lotion can’t repair any DNA damage, according to Cancer Research UK.

More wrinkles
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More wrinkles

Sun-exposed skin can gradually lose moisture and essential oils, making it appear dry, flaky and prematurely wrinkled, even in younger people, according to Harvard Medical School. Exposure to sunlight frays the fibers that prop up firm skin.

Sunspots
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Sunspots

There are several names for sun aging: Poikiloderma of Civatte is one. This is a condition that colors the skin on your neck and cheeks a reddish-brown, WebMD says. It can come along with burning, itching, and extra sensitivity, too.

Spider veins
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Spider veins

Too much sun makes the problem a lot worse by breaking down the collagen beneath the skin. The blood vessels near the surface of the skin are also damaged. When the skin gets hot the body tried to cool down by dilating and bringing superficial veins to the surface, according to the NJ Vein and Vascular Center. Sun exposure may also cause spider veins, especially on the noses or cheeks.

Weaker immune system
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Weaker immune system

UVB radiation appears to reduce the effectiveness of the immune system, according to the World health Organization. Exposure to UV can alter the activity and distribution of some of the cells responsible for healing. This is due to an increase in cytokines and enhanced activity of T cells, which control the immune response to self and foreign particles.

Broken blood vessels
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Broken blood vessels

Sun rays are powerful enough to harm the small blood vessels under your skin, according to WebMD. When you blush or flush, fluid leaks out and causes red blotches and bumps on your face. This is most common in white women between ages 30 and 60.

Scarring
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Scarring

Keep any fresh scars and wounds out of the sun. Don’t apply lotion – just hide them. Period. The problem is the mix of inflammation in the healing tissue and the UV rays. Together they can lead to post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), which may turn the scar and the skin around it dark brown.

Painful sunburn
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Painful sunburn

Even mild sunburn causes painful reddening of the skin. For tender sunburn aloe will help with soothing. More severe sunburn can produce tiny fluid-filled bumps or larger blisters. Blistering skin means you have a second-degree sunburn, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. Never pop them.

Dry skin
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Dry skin

The sun causes the skin to lose moisture and essential oils. It can dehydrate your skin, leaving with you rough patches. Drink lots of water during the day, especially when it’s hot and humid – a combination that can be very dangerous.

Inflammation
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Inflammation

Inflammation, which is often described as redness, swelling, warmth, and pain in certain parts of the body, is a natural process through which body heals after an injury such as exposure to harmful UV rays. The problem occurs when the swelling gets out of control. Aspirin will help cure down on the inflammation.

Skin cancer
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Skin cancer

More skin cancers are diagnosed in the U.S. each year than all other cancers combined, according to the American Cancer Society. Skin cancers develop in the cells of the skin when unrepaired DNA damage generates a genetic mutation that leads to the cells rapidly multiplying, forming malignant tumor. Melanin, which causes skin darkening, is protective against skin cancer. People with fair skin, blonde or red hair, blue or green eyes, and freckles usually have less natural melanin, putting them at higher risk.

Actinic keratosis
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Actinic keratosis

This is a tiny bump that feels like sandpaper. It has a pink, red, yellow or brownish tint. It does not usually go away unless it is frozen, chemically treated or removed by a doctor, according to Harvard Medical School. The condition can develop in skin that has undergone long-term exposure to the sun's UV light. About 15 percent of cases eventually turn into cancer cells.

Scary Things That Happen When You Don’t Wear Sunscreen