Natural Wonders Destroyed by Idiot Tourists from Natural Wonders Destroyed by Idiot Tourists

Natural Wonders Destroyed by Idiot Tourists

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Natural Wonders Destroyed by Idiot Tourists

Earth is a gorgeous place with copious amounts of natural wonders to marvel. If climate change does not pose enough danger to them, human certainly do. A stunning sight to behold is gone…just like that.

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Oregon’s ancient duckbill formation

The iconic sandstone formation, which is more popular by the name “the duckbill” was topped by vandals, and the disgraceful act was recorded on video. A man saw a group of strangers messing with the 7- by 10-foot pedestal on the coast. The video shows people pushing and pulling on the rock. When it comes down, a voice is heard shouting, “Got 'em!”

Michel Mazeau/Wikimedia Commons

The Tree of Ténéré, Sahara

The tree had often been called “the most isolated tree on the planet.” It was the only one for 250 miles in Niger’s Sahara desert. Travelers and caravans used it as a landmark while passing through area. In 1973, a guy, who, most people assume, was drunk, ran the tree over with his truck, according to the Smithsonian Magazine. The Libyan driver was following a roadway that traced the old caravan route, collided with the tree, snapping its trunk.

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The Goblins of Utah

There are many signs in the Goblin Valley State Park that warn to not touch the rocks. Three men, however, must have not seen them because they had knocked over an ancient rock formation. The men, who were recorded on video, claimed they were removing a safety hazard. Eventually they pleaded guilty and were sentenced to a year of probation.

Rafael Ortega Diaz/Wikimedia Commons

Isle de Sa Porrassa, Spain

Bad things can happen when you throw lit cigarettes on the ground with dry grass around. Two teens started a major blaze on the small island off the coast of Magaluf this way. They apologized for being clumsy and said they were sorry to have caused so much damage to the uninhabited island. The two were never arrested or charged.

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Racetrack Playa, California

The fragile and iconic Racetrack Playa, a dry lake and one of the most mysterious places on Earth, in Death Valley National Park was vandalized in 2016 when a man was spinning and swerving wildly in an SUV leaving marks. The suspect allegedly cut 10 miles’ worth of ruts into the playa, according to news reports. The tire tracks were created by someone out for a joyride, local official said.

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Pont Des Arts Bridge (Love Lock Bridge), Paris

Starting some time in 2008, tourists were visiting this iconic landmark, which dates back to Napoleon times, in Paris to place padlocks with their initials as a symbol of their love. By 2015 the bridge could not hold the more than a million objects and a railing collapsed. This is when local authorities decided this was enough and removed all padlocks. Tourists, however, have found other bridges in Paris to continue the trend.

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Paracel Archipelago, China

The disputed land, which has copious sea life, was opened up for tourism in 2016. Soon after that, however, visitors started going, and they brought their huge appetites. You could see on social media images of them killing, cooking and eating endangers species. The people even plucked out entire pieces of living colorful coral to take home.

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“The underwater Amazon” in Indonesia

A cruise ship with hundreds of tourists crashed into one of the world’s most spectacular coral reefs, nicknames “the underwater Amazon.” The ship caused “irreparable damage” in Raja Ampat, a peaceful island chain. About a square mile of the reef is affected and it could take up to a century to repair it, local officials say.

Olin Feuerbacher/USFWS/Wikimedia Commons

Devil's Hole pupfish, California

A group of people went on a drunken rampage in may last year involving gunfire, vomiting, and skinny dipping, causing the death of a tiny endangered fish in Death Valley National Park, according to local officials. Park rangers found a dead pupfish – one of just 115 in the world lives in Devil’s Hole.

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Boeung Kak Lake, Cambodia

In this case the idiots are government officials who allowed the once largest and most important urban wetland and a huge tourist attraction, to be developed. More than 90 percent has been filled with sand in and destroyed. Now it’s just a puddle.

Natural Wonders Destroyed by Idiot Tourists