Ditch the Diet Resolutions and Do These Instead from Ditch the Diet Resolutions and Do These Instead

Ditch the Diet Resolutions and Do These Instead

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Ditch the Diet Resolutions and Do These Instead

Don’t lie to yourself—you are going to make one, if not 10, New Year’s resolutions. Chances are it will have something to do with your physical appearance. The most common resolution for 2016 was losing weight, according to pollsDon’t be fooled by the lure of perfectly-looking people appearing in magazines. Shedding the holiday pounds is not a bad goal, but other objectives are equally important both for your physical and mental health.

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Do more yoga

Fitness-minded personalities should sign up for yoga classes. Try Vinyasa Reformer, combining Flow Yoga and Pilates Reformer, and TRX Yoga, fusing yoga with TRX training to challenge gravity. Yoga will help you understand yourself and your body better; it can also help you bounce back from an injury or illness; and strengthens your core like few other exercises.

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Take fitness outside the box

Take fitness outside the gym by picking up a new hobby like skiing. It’s perfect for this time of the year when resolutions are so popular and it’s a fun sport. It’s not, or it doesn’t have to be, speedy or dangerous. It’s an incredible way to enjoy the outdoors during the winter. Skiing will activate and target your legs, arms, core, providing for a great workout. You can also try snowboarding to snow kiting (it’s like kite surfing on skis).

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Conquer your fears

Have you ever wanted to swim with sharks? Home to everything from sandbar and lemon sharks to massive tiger sharks, the waters off Florida’s Gold Coast are ideal for facing a fear of the ocean’s most notorious predators head on. The Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach Resort & Spa is the perfect base for such an adventure, and can connect guests to a number of local operators who arrange shark dives – both cage and free, with snorkeling and SCUBA diving opportunities

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Learn to cook

Cooking your own meals, one of the best recommendations nutritionists have, is the only way you can be absolutely certain what your body will be consuming. Also, when you cook, you tend to use less processed foods and more natural foods. Cooking at home tends to save people money as well. You can spend $20 on products and make 2-3 meals using them. 

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Volunteer

Volunteering is good for the body and mind, research shows. The biggest benefit is feeling connected to other people. This helps to ward off loneliness and depression. Lower blood pressure and a longer lifespan have also been linked to charitable activities. The reason could be something as logical as increased physical activity among people who aren’t otherwise very active.

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Go offline

You need to truly unplug and unwind in order to relax and recharge. So go to a place where no one can reach you and you are not tempted to use your phone or any other electronic device. Some people refer to this kind of trip as “digital detox,” which is actually healthy for you (unlike the body cleanse type). Element Boston Seaport is inviting guests to hand over their cell phone for safekeeping the entirety of their stay. Those who manage to make it till check-out earn a free stay to be redeemed at a later date.

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Reconnect with old friends

Stay in touch with old friends and relatives who live far away. The secrets to longer lives include healthy and happy social relationships, according to studies.  Research also suggests that lack of such connections can mentally and physically hurt your body as much as alcohol and smoking.

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Go scuba diving

Scuba diving is a fun and thrilling activity that most people would love to do one day. It may be the best way to experience marine life and touch centuries-old shipwreck remains. It offers an escape because it’s something people do in isolation - alone or in small groups - and away from everybody. The views are astonishing and rare. The experience is unforgettable.

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Look on the bright side

Focusing on the bright side is a great natural habit that keeps you young. Create a daily gratitude journal where you think of five things you’re grateful for. Catch yourself when you’re stressed or worried, take a breath, and tell yourself that, one way or another, this experience will make you a better person.” Dr. Roger Jahnke from Health Action Synergies suggests adapting the “attitude of gratitude” – accept what can’t be changed and acknowledge what you’re thankful for.

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Sign up for a new class

You are never too old to go back to school. In fact, this is one of the best ways to improve your memory, mental skills, and keep your brain healthy, according to research. Regular mental stimulation — learning new things, practice memorization, doing puzzles and riddles – also helps protect against Alzheimer’s. Other benefits include the possibility of making new friends, a chance to reinvent yourself, or start a new career.

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Travel

People in the U.S. are using only 77 percent of their paid time off. Use of vacation days is at the lowest point in four decades. More than 222 million such days remained unredeemed in 2015, according to the U.S. Travel Association. Do your best to reverse the trend. The dollar is strong, which means you can get a lot of bang for your buck whether you go to Europe, Africa or Asia.

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Learn a new language

This is a great opportunity to join the multilingual ranks of the 26 percent of adult Americans speak a language other than English, according to Gallup. Learning a new language can stretch your brain and even develop new neural pathways, experts say. For example, for each new language you learn, you'll stave off dementia for about five years. Also, you’ll be more employable.

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Get a pet

The benefits of owning a dog are endless. Research has shown that canines and pets in general, make people happy and improve your heart health. One study that examined 421 adults who previously suffered heart attacks found that after one year, subjects who owned dogs were more likely to live longer than those who did not. Another analyzed 240 married couples and found that those who owned pets exhibited lower heart rates and blood pressure levels.

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Go for a checkup

Americans are visiting the doctor less and less frequently, according to a report. People don’t go for annual checkups because they are scared of the results or don’t have insurance. Later, before you know it, a routine visit to your GP finds your blood pressure to be too high and you're pre-diabetic. Medical checkups can help find conditions before they become major problems.

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Drink less alcohol and soda

Fewer people consume soda – 63 percent avoided it in 2014 compared to 41 percent in 2002, according to Gallup – but many still can’t resist the sweet beverage – the average person drinks 45 gallons a year. People may have replaced soda with booze.  A study found that heavy drinking among Americans rose by 17.2 percent between 2005 and 2012. Some of the potential consequences include fatty liver, cancer, heart failure, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes.

Ditch the Diet Resolutions and Do These Instead