Cold Weather Health Myths from Cold Weather Health Myths

Cold Weather Health Myths

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Cold Weather Health Myths

The colder weather is arriving; people are out purchasing their warm winter gear and preparing for winter’s harsh temperatures. But before you run out and buy that expensive hat and stock up on alcohol to keep you warm, you should learn about some of the cold weather misconceptions.

*Related: 10 Interesting Facts About Body Temperature

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Cold Air Makes You Sick

Contrary to what many people believe, the cold air does not make you sick – infectious diseases do.  According to healthline.com, “you have to come in contact with rhinoviruses to come down with a cold and influenza virus to contract the flu. The rhinoviruses peak in spring and fall, and flu viruses in winter.”

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Drinking Alcohol Helps You Stay Warm

Drinking alcohol may help you feel warmer, but the truth is that your body temperature is actually going down. According to discovery.com, “alcohol may make your skin feel warm, but this apparent heat wave is deceptive. A nip or two actually causes your blood vessels to dilate, moving warm blood closer to the surface of your skin, making you feel warmer temporarily.”

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You Don’t Need to Wear Sunscreen in the Winter

Just because you don’t see the sun doesn’t mean it’s not there. The sun is just as strong and equally as damaging in the winter months, compared to the summer months. Always remember to wear sunscreen; it’s one of the best ways to protect your skin from the suns UV rays.

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It’s Not a Good Idea to Exercise in the Cold

You may be tempted to hibernate under the covers, especially when the colder weather starts to come around. But the truth is that exercising in cold weather can be even more beneficial than exercising in the heat. Your body has to work harder when it’s cold outside, leading to a boost in your metabolism and more calories burned. Also, exercise releases endorphins and improves your mood, so working out in the winter months can help fight Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), often referred to as winter blues.

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You Lose Heat Through Your Head So You Should Wear a Hat to Keep Warm

It has been long said that we lose heat through our heads, but the truth is that studies have actually shown when people get exposed to cold weather with no clothing, they only lose about 10 percent of their body heat through their head.

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Allergies Disappear in the Winter

People can suffer from both indoor and outdoor allergies. In the winter months, indoor allergies can actually become worse. Why? Windows are usually closed, leading to poor air quality in your home and pets aren’t spending as much time outdoors.

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Cold Temperature Causes Hair Loss

Despite what you may have heard, cold temperatures does not mean an increase in hair loss. According to The Choe Center for Hair Restoration, cooler temperatures may actually increase the number of hairs a person has. “Similar to the way dogs grow a thicker coat of fur in the winter, people might get more scalp hair in the cooler parts of the year to help them stay warm.”

Cold Weather Health Myths