25 Reasons to Pack Your Bags and Visit Hawaii Now from 25 Reasons to Pack Your Bags and Visit Hawaii Now

25 Reasons to Pack Your Bags and Visit Hawaii Now

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25 Reasons to Pack Your Bags and Visit Hawaii Now

If you haven’t already decided where to spend your hard-earned vacation, consider the Aloha State as your next destination. Get on a plane and start having fun. The reasons to go are diverse; any kind of traveler will find motivation to explore the islands because of their unique offerings.

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Runner’s HI 20K

Experience Hawaii in a different way. Those of you who like to run marathons will like the Runner’s HI 20K. The next one is scheduled for September 3. There are other long and short runs organized every month. Stay in shape while you’re on vacation in a much more fun way than hitting the gym at the resort every morning.

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Challenging triathlons

The more athletic of you who don’t want to only run for a long time can simply sign up for a triathlon. Swim, bike and run through this beautiful state. The Na Wahine Festival is coming up on September 10. It takes place in the Kapiolani Park, the largest and second oldest public park in Hawaii.

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Cliff diving

Hawaii is well-known for its popular cliff diving spots, some of which include Black Rock in Maui, Kawainui Falls in Hilo, Leap of Faith in Oahu, Nuuanu Water Tower in Honolulu, and Southpoint Cliffs in Naalehu.

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This is the dry season

The weather is much nicer now because it’s still the dry season. It corresponds to summer and falls between April and October. The rainy season is in winter and last from November through March. The off season is the time to go for best rates and no crowds; it is late spring and fall from September to mid-December.

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See the world’s highest sea cliffs

Kalaupapa Cliffs are the world’s highest sea cliffs. The superb cliffs soar between 3,600 and 3,900 feet above the ocean, according to GoHawaii.com. Tourists can’t really drive to see them because there are no roads to take them there, but people can take a helicopter tour, a direct flight to Molokai, or go to the Kalaupapa overlook from Pala’au State Park.

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Drive scenic roads

The Road to Hana is one of America’s most scenic roads. It is almost 65 miles of pure beauty and thrill. You’ll drive by steep sea-cliffs, see flourishing mango trees, and stop to soak in views that look like they are from the Jurassic Park movies with breathtaking waterfalls. If you go all the way, you’ll make more than 600 turns and drive through shorelines, bridges, and hills.

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Learn to surf at Waikiki

Learn to surf at Waikiki or Big Island’s Kahalu’u Bay in Kona, but make sure to watch the pros on the North Shore in Oahu, also known as the Seven Mile Miracle. Banzai Pipeline and Haleiwa are known for their big waves.

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Hike the Waihee Ridge Trail

The lush greenery and tropical scenery are perhaps most incredible in the summer. This five-mile hike in Maui climbs more than 1,500 feet through forest and over a winding ridge. The beginning is a bit brutal but the views of water cascading off Makamaka'ole Falls are astonishing. Seeing the valley from the farthest peak is exceedingly dreamlike.

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Visit the country’s only tropical forest

Hawaii is the only state with a tropical forest. Molokai’s east end is a tropical rainforest that receives 240 inches of rainfall a year. Go on a gorgeous hike through the lavish woodland along mountain streams and pools and past ancient Hawaiian taro patch and hale. Make sure you make it all the way to see the 150-foot waterfall in the jungle where scenes from LOST, Hawaii Five-0 and Jurassic Park were filmed.

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Thrilling zip lining

Experience the #1 Zip line Tour in Hawaii as Voted by Hawaii Magazine's Best of the Best Readers’ Choice Awards 2016, according to Zipline.com. The Ka’anapali 8 Line Adventure tour will have you soaring through the mountains on eight incredible zip lines. Make sure you book your tour early; it tends to sell out fast. Soar through trees, across canyons, and through rainforests while capturing a nice warm breeze.

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Hike an active volcano

As the most active volcano in Hawaii, Kilauea has had a history of eruptions. A major one in 1983 produced Pu'u 'Ō'ō vent which still produces lava flows. Kilauea is one of the most incredible active volcanoes you can actually hike. Try the Kīlauea Iki Trail. You will descend through a lush rainforest to

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Stargaze at the world’s largest observatory

Mauna Kea is a 13,796-foot volcanic mountain; it has no lifts, no grooming, no resorts, but a road that goes to the summit to serve the observatories located at the top, according to Hawaii Info Guide. Go camping under the stars here. The place is home to the world’s largest astronomical observatory which has the largest optical telescope. You can find the 2017 stargazing calendar for Hawaii here.

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Meet native Hawaiians in Halawa Valley

You won’t find any resorts, fancy hotels, and big restaurants there. And the locals, many of whom are Native Hawaiian, prefer it that way. There is not much to do there but to see Hawaii’s natural untouched beauty and get a taste from the past if you drive from Kaunakakai to Halawa Valley. Locals there surf and swim. Hike into the East End’s classic cathedral valley to see Hawaii back in time.

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Go skydiving

Skydive in Hawaii to experience one of the world’s most spectacular dropzones. Experience skydiving for your first time by going tandem. Follow a few minutes of instruction, then freefall with a professional instructor. Skydive Hawaii offers special discounts for members of the military, birthday parties, students, and groups. 

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Kayak around Na Pali Coast

This is a place you should see by kayak, and the trip is worth it. The 17 miles of ocean shores is one of the most popular attractions on Kauai. The tall cliffs along the coastline are some of the most dramatic in the world. You’ll see dolphins, seals, sea turtles, sea caves, mangoes, waterfalls, and many stunning and secluded beaches.

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Sample local family restaurants

Sampling the mom and pop locally owned restaurants on the oldest of the island chain, Kauai, is a culinary experience like no other. Stop at the Kilauea Fish Market, The Right Slice, The Fresh Shave, and Kickshaws for the best food you’ll evert taste in Hawaii.

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Buy tropical fruit at a roadside stand

Stop along the roadside at the pop-up tents overflowing with fresh fruit/produce. They are located on your way toward Turtle Bay Resort/Kahuku, according to Hawaii Life. They are known for having great prices on whole or cut fresh fruit and refreshing ice cold coconuts; on some days they have hot BBQ skewers or fried banana lumpia, which is a  banana wrapped in pastry paper and deep fried.

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Sunrise hike at Haleakala

Mt. Haleakala is the world’s largest dormant volcano. Rising more than 10,000 feet, Haleakala offers some of the most mesmerizing sunrise and sunsets you’ll ever see. The crater is huge – 7 miles across, 2 miles wide and 2,600 feet deep. It last erupted in 1790. Some of the best adventures in Haleakala National Park include paragliding, camping, biking down a volcano, stargazing, and zip lining.

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Snorkeling at Molokini

Molokini Crater, one of only three volcanic calderas in the world, offers a snorkeling experience like no other. More than 200 species of fish reside there. Located just a few miles off Maui’s shore, it is Hawaii’s only island marine sanctuary. Scientists believe Molokini Crater formed about 150 thousand years ago, according to Pride of Maui.

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See the lava flow at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

The park gives you the opportunity to visit two of the world’s most active volcanoes.  Take a 20-minute walk through the forest to will reach the Thurston Lava Tube. Be silent and listen to the lava moving underground. Remember, hundreds of years ago hot lava rushed through exactly where you are standing.

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Ride some of the famous Ironman Course

With tour operators Ride & Seek and Big Island Bike Tours, ride the roads of Hawaii’s grueling and windy Ironman bike course, through coffee plantations and up the world's largest active volcano, the 13,677-foot Mauna Loa. You’ll also get to soak away any muscle soreness in the heated tide pools of Kapoho.

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Catch the views and hike Waimea Canyon

Waimea Canyon is referred to as “The Grand Canyon of the Pacific.” It stretches 14 miles long; it is one mile wide and more than 3,600 feet deep. This geological wonder provides panoramic views of crested buttes, rugged crags and deep valley gorges. The grand inland vistas go on for miles, according to GoHawaii.

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Green Sands Beach and Kailua Beach

Green Sands, officially Papakolea beach, is one of the only four green sand beaches in the world. Kailua beach, only 15 minutes away from the airport, is off the beaten path along the Kohala coast. You’ll have to walk to the shore across lava, which is all the more interesting. All of Hawaii’s beaches are public property and are free.

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Stunning waterfalls on the Hamakua Coast

With 84 inches of rainfall a year, this area is known for the Hamakua Heritage Corridor drive, a road trip along the coastline that passes by lush tropical rainforests, waterfalls and lovely seaside views, according to Go Hawaii. Stop by the World Botanical Gardens, home to triple-tiered Umauma Falls. This area is also home to Akaka Falls, one the Hawaii Island’s most cherished waterfalls.

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Swim through Coral Gardens on the Kona Coast

Fronting the stunning West Maui Mountains, Coral Gardens was formed when lava flows extended across the ocean floor nearly 500,000 years ago, according to Hawaii Guide. These volcanic “fingers” deliver the perfect environment for marine life to flourish. You’ll swim along a spectacular range of tropical fish, many of which can only be found in Hawaii’s waters.

25 Reasons to Pack Your Bags and Visit Hawaii Now