16 Surprising Holiday Foods You Should Stay Away From from 16 Surprising Holiday Foods You Should Stay Away From

16 Surprising Holiday Foods You Should Stay Away From

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16 Surprising Holiday Foods You Should Stay Away From

The end of the year is a time for celebration. Many of us attend holiday events, go to parties, and get together with family. And though it’s an exciting time, it’s important to stay on track with your health, keep a nutritious diet, and exercise.

This could be due to the fact that many of us stop exercising during this time of the year. We become so busy with our day-to-day tasks that we make up excuses and “can’t find the time to workout.” Keep your fitness goals intact and motivate yourself by setting a goal for Jan 1. Participate in group fitness classes, try outdoor sports, and practice yoga for stress relief.

Sticking to a healthy diet is key for maintaining your weight during the holidays. You can do this by staying away from certain staple foods such as eggnog, candy canes, and Swedish meatballs, to name a few.

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Fudge

"Fudge is made with chocolate, butter, sweetened condensed milk, and whatever other things you decide to throw in,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, Lose It! advisor and nutrition expert. She suggests eating chocolate bark instead. “It allows you to get that chocolate holiday fix without the extra calorie-laden butter & sweetened condensed milk,” she adds.

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Holiday Cookie Creamers (Sugar & Gingerbread)

“Those who logged holiday cookie creamers in Lose It! last December recorded losing less weight this year than those who didn't log the cookie-flavored creamers,” Kirkpatrick says.

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Cheesecake

If a delicious and creamy slice of cheesecake is your go-to holiday dessert, you may want to reconsider. The cream cheese, sugar, salt, eggs, sour cream, and whipped cream call for a high-caloric disaster. One slice of commercially prepared cheesecake contains about 18 grams of fat, of which 8 grams are saturated.

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Eggnog

One cup of eggnog has similar nutritional value to a Snickers bar, Kirkpatrick says. If this is a treat that you really enjoy, make sure that you plan for it and intentionally fit it into your caloric budget, she adds.

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Spinach Artichoke Dip

“Don't let the words ‘spinach’ or ‘artichoke’ fool you -- this dip is mostly cream cheese, sour cream, mayonnaise, and cheese, and offers a very easy way to accidentally eat many more calories than you intended,” Kirkpatrick explains. “Instead of this dip, opt for hummus & veggies, which will offer you lots of good fiber and a good bang-for-your-buck, calorically speaking.”

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Starbucks Peppermint Mocha

Although delicious, you may want to reconsider drinking your calories. This famous holiday Starbucks drink will put a damper on your weight loss efforts. One Starbucks Grande Peppermint Mocha is made with 2-percent milk, mocha sauce, peppermint syrup, whipped cream, and dark chocolate curls. It has 440 calories, 15 grams of fat, 63 grams of carbs, and 140 milligrams of sodium. Tip: Ask for the skinny version with sugar-free flavoring.

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Sweet Treats for Breakfast (Doughnuts, Cinnamon Rolls, Pastries, Muffins)

“When Lose It! users log sweet treats (like [doughnuts], cinnamon rolls, pastries, and muffins) for breakfast, they tend to eat more total calories on that day,” Kirkpatrick says. “Lose It! members tend to have these sweet breakfast treats more often than normal during the holidays.” She recommends spending your breakfast calories on foods like eggs, yogurt, fruit, and cereal.

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Glazed Ham

If you’re thinking about serving ham at your holiday dinner, consider eating it without the glaze. The high sodium content in ham is already unhealthy; when you add the glaze, you’re pretty much dousing your meal in sugar.

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Popcorn Buckets

“Usually popcorn is a low-cal food, but not here,” Kirkpatrick says. “When topped with caramel, cheese, or chocolate, popcorn's nutrition changes a lot.” It was observed in data from last year that “people who logged caramel popcorn during the holidays reported losing less weight than those who logged regular popcorn.”

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Swedish Meatballs

“You may see these and think ‘well that's a high protein snack-- what's wrong with Swedish meatballs?’ Yes, they have protein, but they're also made with sugar, bread, cream, and butter,” Kirkpatrick explains. “These meatballs to have a much different nutritional profile than your typical ones!”

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Candy Canes

Candy canes are a signature holiday treat, and as tempting it may be to unwrap and eat one, you should avoid doing so. They are drowning in sugar. For every candy cane you eat, you’re also eating about 60 calories.

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Latkes

“The simple starch of white potatoes plus the oil they're cooked in can make traditional latkes a food to have in moderation,” Kirkpatrick says. “Consider modifying your recipe to include sweet potatoes, whole wheat flour, and egg whites and then bake them, rather than pan fry them. These small changes greatly improve the nutritional quality of latkes!”

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Fruitcake

Fruitcake is a popular holiday favorite, and contrary to what many people believe, just because it has the word “fruit” in it, doesn’t mean that it’s healthy. This treat contains tons of sugar, corn syrup, and butter. Three ounces of Hickory Farms Fruitcake has 330 calories, 15 grams of fat, 3 grams of saturated fat, 30 milligrams of cholesterol, 160 milligrams of sodium, and 45 grams of carbs, according to calorieking.com.

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Dinner Rolls/Croissants

“You're likely to see a basket of dinner rolls on the dining table this holiday season. But, luckily, you'll also find these on the menu throughout the entire year,” Kirkpatrick says. “Instead of spending your budget on empty bread calories that do little to keep you satisfied, indulge in items that are only here for a short time. Tis the Season!”

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Chocolate Martini

Whether you are at a party, family gathering, or special event, deliciously sweet cocktails are common during the holidays. Some cocktails are better than others, but the truth is that although dark chocolate does have numerous health benefits, you should avoid chocolate martinis. Mixing vodka, chocolate liquor and syrup calls for a high-caloric disaster — about 300 calories per glass.

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Don't Waste Calories on Foods You Don't Really Like!

“If you're going to splurge a bit, make it worth it,” Kirkpatrick says. “Go for a sensible slice of Grandma Martha's yule log that you look forward to every year, not the store-bought cookies Uncle Doug brought over.”

16 Surprising Holiday Foods You Should Stay Away From