1. Corbet’s Couloir from The Most Dangerous Ski Runs in the World

The Most Dangerous Ski Runs in the World

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1. Corbet’s Couloir

Photo Modified: Flickr / Roderick Eime / CC BY 4.0

Location: Jackson Hole Mountain, Wyoming

Ski down Corbet’s Couloir but make sure to avoid the rocks! According to Forbes, “the run is named for Barry Corbet, a mountaineer who in 1960 spotted a narrow crease of snow shaped like an upside-down funnel, high up on the mountain now known as Jackson Hole. Said he: ‘Someday someone will ski that." Eventually, somebody did. They entered the free fall and dropped onto the 55-degree slope. For those of you unwilling to attempt Corbet’s Couloir, there is an area for you to stand and watch the risk takers.

 

 

2. Harakiri

Photo Modified: Flickr / Henning Leweke / CC BY-SA 4.0

Location: Mayrhofen, Austria

Harakiri is a terrifying ski run; it is the world’s steepest groomed slope. Prepare yourself because Harakiri stands vertical at 78%. Luckily for skiers it is a short run, but that doesn’t mean it is easy! Harakiri is extremely icy and takes a lot of innocent lives. *Fact, Harikiri is named after the Japanese term for suicide.

3. Christmas Chute

Alyeska Resort / Facebook

Location: Alyeska Resort

Alyeska Resort is the biggest ski resort in Alaska. Ready to go? Take chair 6 to the highest point of the mountain. Once you’re off the lift, off you go, down a really narrow, icy, nerve-wracking slope. The Christmas Chute has a 45-degree drop surrounded by rocks walls on both sides of you. That being said, only attempt if you are an advanced skier.

4. Delirium Dive

Photo Modified: Flickr / Adam Kahtava / CC BY 4.0

Location: Sunshine Village, Canada

Be very careful on this slope… Delirium is avalanche-prone! The Sunshine Village takes extreme safety precaution because it is so dangerous. Just in case skiers need to be rescued they are hooked up with a radio transponder. So, ski at your own risk, slide down its horizontal rock band, and be careful of the multiple cliffs and rocks.

5. Tortin

Photo Modified: Flickr / Karim von Orelli / CC BY 4.0

Location: Verbier, Switzerland

Tortin is known as one of the “sketchiest” mountains on the continent. You will begin your adventure in Mount-Gele and end up on Tortin. The further you go down the slope the more dangerous it gets. Tortin is 3,023 meters above sea level and an extremely bumpy ride. This slope is a free ride slope; it will test your ski level and show you a whole new ski experience.

6. The Streif

Photo Modified: Flickr / Polybert49 / CC BY-SA 4.0

Location: Kitzbuhel

The Streif is the most famous downhill slope in Hahnenkamm. It is where the World Cup alpine downhill ski race takes place. This course consists of difficult “fall-away” turns. January is the most dangerous month to ride the slope. It is almost always foggy with overcast and shade. The top elevation of this course is 5,463 ft. and its base elevation is 2,641 ft.

7. La Chavanette

Photo Modified: Wikimedia Commons / Aledevries / CC BY-SA 4.0

Location: Avoriaz, France

La Chavanette is also known as La Mur Suisse (“The Swiss Wall”). It is more than 50 degrees steep with parts covered in ice! Imagine riding down a narrow slope starting with a 40 degree incline, with extremely heavy turns, and high winds. Well, that the La Chavanette experience. The slope begins in France and ends in Switzerland.

8. La Grave

Photo Modified: Flickr / Risto Kinnunen / CC BY-SA 4.0

Location: France

La Gave is a small ski resort in France. It is home of the world’s only fully suspended surface lift. Skiing alone is very dangerous. If you are going to attempt this slope, make sure you have a guide by your side. The vertical drop of La Gave Is 2,150 meters. You will begin the slope at 1,450 meters; it will gradually grow to 2,400 meters. Make sure you stay within the marked runs to avoid falling into a crevasse.

9. Valluga North Face

Photo Modified: Flickr / fourthandfifteen / CC BY 4.0

Location: St. Anton

Looking for some of the best off-piste skiing? Look no further, challenge yourself on the Valluga North Face. Take the Valluga 2 lift, and begin your 4 km ride! Ride downhill at 900 meters, but beware of the high winds and avalanche risks.

10. Silverfox

Photo Modified: Flickr / Lietmotiv / CC BY-SA 4.0

Location: Snowbird, Utah

Take a 10-minute Snowbird tram ride to reach this difficult slope! You MUST be a skilled skier to attempt this course. This was the location of the Freeride World Tour, and is home of one of the most dangerous places with fall-line skiing. Be careful of the entrance. It is extremely rocky, making it hard for skiers to maneuver their way through.

11. Mad River Glen

Photo Modified: Wikimedia Commons / DavidWBrooks / CC BY-SA 3.0

Location: Fayston, Vermont

Mad River Glen is the said to be the most challenging slope on the east coast. It is a 38-degree pitch run and sits in the Mad River Valley. Prepare yourself because this slope has a 2,000-foot vertical drop! If you’re debating Mad River Glen, make sure you are careful of its very narrow trails and large amount of snowfall.

12. Taos Ski Valley

Photo Modified: Flickr / YoTuT / CC BY 4.0

Location: New Mexico

I hope you’re up for an adventure; Taos Ski Valley is surrounded by the wilderness. Get in shape and make sure your leg muscles are ready to go; this slope is covered in rugged terrain. Even though you will end up with severe leg pains, reaching the end of this slope successfully is an amazing accomplishment!

13. The Lauberhorn

Photo Modified: Flickr / Chris Schaer / CC BY-SA 4.0

Location: Switzerland

Visit Switzerland for the ride of your life! The length of The Lauberhorn is 4,480 km. It is the home of the Lauberhorn Run. According to MySwitzerland.com, “the Lauberhorn Run has been the scene of all kinds of fates and emotions. At 4.5 km, it is the longest and most demanding World Cup downhill course.”