Deadliest States for Runners and Walkers from 10 Deadliest States for Runners, Joggers, Hikers and Other Pedestrians

10 Deadliest States for Runners, Joggers, Hikers and Other Pedestrians

Deadliest States for Runners and Walkers

flickr_ftlauderdale001. Licensed under Creative Commons.

Runners and walkers, perforce, spend a lot of the time on the streets. And they share the highway with all manner of traffic. It can be a deadly combination.

The chance that you will be hit and killed by a motor vehicle when out running or walking is small. But it is not zero. 

More than 4,000 runners, joggers, hikers and other pedestrians die in traffic accidents each year in America. That is one in seven of all traffic-accident fatalities and works out to 1.51 deaths for every 100,000 people in the U.S. 


10. Nevada

flickr_Total due. Licensed under Creative Commons

1.68 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

Nevada has halved its pedestrian fatality rate over the past 15 years, a decline bettered only by sparsely populated Nebraska.

9. Mississippi

flickr_Jack Wickes. Licensed under Creative Commons

1.71 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

A poor state that was slow to spend tax dollars on making its streets safer for those on foot; only three states did worse in reducing pedestrian fatality rates since 1994, though it has done better over the past five years.

8. North Carolina

flickr_CLTPathmaker. Licensed under Creative Commons

1.74 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

One of the most densely populated states, it has the fifth most traffic-related pedestrian deaths each year and is home to four of the ten cities rated least walking friendly.

7. Maryland

flickr_Elvert Barnes. Licensed under Creative Commons

1.83 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

One of the most suburbanized states in the nation and with a big city, Baltimore has been accused of having the nation's worst behaved pedestrians.

6. Arizona

flickr_Steven Luscher. Licensed under Creative Commons

2.04 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

Wider sidewalks and other new runner- and walker-friendly infrastructure has propelled Arizona in to the top five of states reducing pedestrian fatality rates since 2010.

5. New Mexico

flickr_Paul Sableman. Licensed under Creative Commons

2.05 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

After declining faster than in all but five states since the 1990s, the pedestrian fatality rate has ticked up.

4. Louisiana

flickr_Sean Marshall. Licensed under Creative Commons

2.21 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

Another of the poorest states in the nation unable to keep up with needed road safety infrastructure improvements, leaving it underperforming the national averages in reducing pedestrian deaths.

3. South Carolina

flickr_Matt Drobnik. Licensed under Creative Commons

2.23 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

Pedestrian fatality rates have ticked up despite an overall decline in traffic accidents in another of the states with above average volumes and lengths of car commutes.

2. Delaware

flickr_elkton_rd3. Licensed under Creative Commons

2.29 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

Alcohol and drugs are involved in a greater percentage of traffic fatalities than in other state and reflecting that the number of pedestrian deaths in Delaware fluctates more year to year than in any other state.

1. Florida

flickr_Ricardo Reyes. Licensed under Creative Commons

2.55 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 resident population.

Despite being the most deadly state in the nation for runners and walkers, pedestrian fatality rates have been falling sharply following a state-government push to make Florida more walking friendly, an initiative that has lowered the number of such deaths by 17% from 2005's peak.