Bryce Canyon National Park

Overview

What is Bryce Canyon? A cave without a ceiling? A forest of stone? Even 'canyon' is misleading since Bryce is carved by freeze-thaw cycles, not a river. Yet, 'world's largest pothole' is neither adequate nor flattering. At Bryce Canyon National Park, erosion has shaped colorful Claron limestones, sandstones, and mudstones into thousands of spires, fins, pinnacles, and mazes. These colorful and whimsical formations stand in horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters along the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in Southern Utah.

Map

Seasonality / Weather

The park is open 24 hours per day through out the year. There may be temporary road closures during and shortly after winter snow storms until plowing is completed and conditions are safe for visitor traffic. Road maintenance may require brief closures of individual areas at other times.

Directions

Driving: 

From the north or south on US Hwy 89: Turn east on Utah Hwy 12 (seven miles south of Panguitch, Utah) and travel to the junction of Utah 12 and 63. Turn south (right) onto Utah 63 and travel three miles to reach the park entrance. From the east: Travel west on Utah 12 to the intersection with Utah 63. Turn south (left) to reach the park entrance.

From late May through early October, the free Bryce Canyon Shuttle takes visitors to the park's most popular viewpoints, trails and facilities. Using the shuttle is voluntary, but encouraged.

Flying: 

The closest major airports are in Las Vegas (LAS), Nevada and Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah, each approximately 270 miles from the park. There are smaller airports in Cedar City (CDC), Utah (80 miles) and St. George (SGU), Utah (125 miles).

Public Transport: 

There is no public transportation into the park. Upon arriving at Bryce Canyon, Utah, you can use the Bryce Canyon Shuttle to enter and visit the park.