Acadia National Park

Overview

Located on the rugged coast of Maine, Acadia National Park encompasses over 47,000 acres of granite-domed mountains, woodlands, lakes and ponds, and ocean shoreline. Such diverse habitats create striking scenery and make the park a haven for wildlife and plants.

Entwined with the natural diversity of Acadia is the story of people. Evidence suggests native people first lived here at least 5,000 years ago. Subsequent centuries brought explorers from far lands, settlers of European descent, and, arising directly from the beauty of the landscape, tourism and preservation.

Attracted by the paintings and written works of the rusticators, artists who portrayed the beauty of Mount Desert Island in their works, the affluent of the turn of the century flocked to the area. Though they came in search of social and recreational activities, these early conservationists had much to do with preserving the landscape. George B. Dorr, the park's first superintendent, came from this social strata. He devoted 43 years of his life, energy, and family fortune to preserving the Acadia landscape. Thanks to the foresight of Dorr and others like him, Acadia became the first national park established east of the Mississippi.

Today the park offers scientific, educational, and recreational activities unparalleled along the east coast. Hike to the top of Cadillac Mountain to enjoy a spectacular sunrise over Frenchman's Bay or explore some of the quieter, more secluded mountain paths. Bike over 40 miles of the tree-lined carriage roads that wind over hillsides and near glassy lakes. Join a ranger to experience Acadia's resources first-hand. Or just admire the views and let yourself unwind, knowing you're taking part in a long-standing tradition.

Map

Seasonality / Weather

Acadia National Park is open all year. Information is available at park headquarters all year and at Hulls Cove Visitor Center from April 15 through October.

Most facilities--including the visitor center, museums, picnic areas, Seawall Campground, and many roads--close during the winter. Most of the Park Loop Road, including the road to Cadillac Mountain, is closed from December 1 through April 14 and at other times when severe weather creates dangerous conditions.

Directions

Driving: 

Acadia National Park is located approximately six hours north of Boston. From Boston take I-95 north to Augusta, Maine; from Augusta take Route 3 east to Ellsworth and on to Mount Desert Island or take I-95 north to Bangor, Maine; from Bangor take Route 1A east to Ellsworth; from Ellsworth take Route 3 to Mount Desert Island.

Flying: 

Fly into Hancock County Airport, located 10 miles from Acadia National Park. National airlines serve the Bangor International Airport, about 1 hour from the park. Car rentals are available at both airports.

Public Transport: 

Concord Trailways and Vermont Transit offer service between Boston's Logan Airport and Bangor. Vermont Transit operates between Bangor and Bar Harbor during the summer months.