20 Cold Places to Escape to This Summer from 20 Cold Places to Escape to This Summer

20 Cold Places to Escape to This Summer

20 Cold Places to Escape to This Summer

Instead of looking for creative ways to beat the summer heat, head out to a cool place where you won’t have to hide from the sun to enjoy water sports and wilderness adventures.

Summer is a time to get outside and explore and to try new things. Don’t let high temperatures stop you. Whether you already have favorite outdoor hobbies or are looking for new, going on an adventure is always worth it.

Do something unconventional this season and discover a new side of a place you probably can’t imagine in the summer.

Nova Scotia, Canada

Nova Scotia, Canada
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It is usually around 70F in the summer – perfectly cool. The maritime province is an adventurous place. Tidal bore rafting – on the highest tides in the world – and surfing are popular example. The province’s popular attractions celebrate what it is mostly known for – music, reconstructed fortress towns and seaside vineyards.

Greenland

Greenland
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With an Arctic climate you can expect average temperatures that do not exceed 50F. Greenland's epic fjords and remote arctic tundra remain under the radar. Polar bears live and breed in the northernmost parts of West Greenland. You can see calving glaciers, giant icebergs, and Arctic landscapes.

Iceland

Iceland
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Warm summer days reach a temperature around the mid-70s F. Few places on Earth are still considered truly wild, even though the country has been gaining popularity. Sometimes referred to as the “Land of Fire and Ice,” the Nordic island’s contrasting landscapes most famously feature many molten lava fields and a number of fascinating glacial terrains.

Denali National Park, Alaska

Denali National Park, Alaska
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Summer daytime temperatures are usually in the 50s and 60s F. Mountains, wildflowers and Huskies are calling your name at this century-old park. The park features 6 million acres of mountains, glaciers, forests and tundra, and centers around the highest peak in North America, Denali, formerly known as Mount McKinley.

Ireland

Ireland
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The averages for highest temperatures between May and July are between 64 and 68 F. There is something magical about Ireland. Maybe it’s the pristine beaches or magnificent castles. Regardless to if you are looking for adventure or relaxation, Ireland has it all. From glacial valleys to exciting festivals, nature reserves and horse races, your trip to Ireland will never be a bore.

Mammoth Mountain, California

Mammoth Mountain, California
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The fact that you can ski here in June says it all. Just 30 minutes from the eastern entrance of Yosemite National Park, you can easily roll your ski vacation and some spectacular sightseeing into one visit. The high elevation at Mammoth Mountain allows for one of the longest ski seasons in North America. Mammoth is also a top resort for snowboarding.

The Alps

The Alps
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July temperatures range between 59 and 75 F. The iconic European Alps are beloved by snow sports enthusiasts, but climate change is bringing challenges for the mountain range. The Matterhorn, standing at the border between Switzerland and Italy, is a must-see. It is one of the highest summits in the Alps and Europe – at approximately 14,692 feet.

Patagonia

Patagonia
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Summer months bring temperature of around 65-70 F. The Fitz Roy Trek is among the most incredible hikes that leads to waterfalls. Fairly easy walks without any big climbs are ideal for trekkers who want to visit one of several large waterfalls in the area. Patagonia is also a wonderful SUP destination. You’ll be cruising past gigantic glaciers and some of the most stunningly incredible landscapes on the planet.

Garzón, Uruguay

Garzón, Uruguay
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Summer temperatures don’t really surpass 65 F. This is the season to go on wine tastings. The charming town, located south of the Equator, is a ranching village and a rural countryside getaway. The most famous winery is the Bodega Garzón. In addition to spectacular wine, it offers hot-air-balloon rides and olive harvest adventures.

Olympic National Park, Washington

Olympic National Park, Washington
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It usually is around 60 F. Temperatures may vary from 10-20 degrees, especially along the coast and higher elevations, according to the NPS. What makes Olympic National Park a favorite is its unique combination of three distinct environments: the mountains, a coast laced with sea stacks, and a rainforest where every available inch is covered with growth.

Vancouver Island, Canada

Vancouver Island, Canada
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Summer temperatures vary between late 50s and mid-70s. The island is one of the best places to go on whale-watching adventures. While you’re there, visit some of the most unique places you can stay overnight – the Free Spirit Spheres.

Fjords, Norway

Fjords, Norway
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Summer there in early August. The sun is at its warmest with temperatures reaching 75 F. Norway is easily among the most beautiful countries in the world and the fjords are its trademark. The rugged scenery and massive inlets are magnificent. The fjords region ranges from the coast from Stavanger to the Russian border. The rustic village resorts look like they are from a fairytale.

Scotland

Scotland
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Average maximum temperatures in the summer range from 60 F to 65 F. Scottish Highlands is often used as a synonym with Scotland, even though there is a Lowlands region. Explore the spectacular unspoiled nature with rugged massifs, deep blue creeks and empty valleys where Red Deer rule the hills, and see what the fuss is all about.

New Zealand

New Zealand
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The coldest months are June, July and August when the maximum temperature ranges between 50 and 60 F. The mention of New Zealand invokes thoughts of vast landscapes, Lord of the Rings, award-winning wineries, and thrill-seeking adventures – all discovered at the end of the earth.

Falls Creek, Australia

Falls Creek, Australia
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Skiing in the summer? Yes, please. This resort town, Victoria’s largest, in northeastern Australia is popular for being an alpine and cross-country ski center. There are more than 40 miles of free cross-country trails, downhill skiing, snowboarding, and tobogganing.

Sweden

Sweden
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As a Nordic country, the average maximum temperature is around 73 F in July, the warmest month. Go on an adventure trip of a lifetime to the Swiss National Park. Located in the Western Rhaetian Alps, it is the largest protected area and the only national park in the country. There is so much to do, and even more to explore. In the summer, go hiking, biking and embark on an outdoor rafting trip.

Hossa National Park, Finland

Hossa National Park, Finland
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July temperatures in Finland are usually around 60 F. The wilderness of Hossa is stunning. The trails run along pine moorlands that just make you want to hike and bike all day; the crystal-clear lakes are ideal for canoeing and fishing. There are open wilderness huts, lean-to shelters, campfire sites, camping grounds.

Easter Island, Chile

Easter Island, Chile
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Summer temperatures hover around 65-70 F. This World Heritage Site is the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian Triangle. Visitors go to for a sense of isolation unlike anything they could find on mainland Chile. The now-barren island was once populated by the Rapa Nui civilization (and many trees) and is home to around 6,000 permanent residents.

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Buenos Aires, Argentina
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The average high temperatures in July and August range between 60 and 65 F. The wine, the tango, the nightlife, the architecture – the reasons to visit this beautiful city are endless. The Latin American hub is full of energy, adventure and exceptional beauty.

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
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The Capital of British Columbia has an abundance of parkland, making it perfect for outdoor and recreational activities, especially when the summer temperatures are in the late 60s F. Victoria’s shores meet the waves of the Pacific Ocean, and the land offers tourists access to rainforests and the Olympic Mountains.