Asics GEL-Kayano 19 from Running Shoes for Wide Feet 2013

Running Shoes for Wide Feet 2013

Full Story
Asics

Asics GEL-Kayano 19

Category: High Stability

An icon on the running shoe scene, the Kayano is marked by a relatively wide forefoot design. Featuring the utmost in both support and cushioning, this isn’t the lightest shoe, but it’ll be both protective and durable over many miles. Strategically placed seams and overlays contribute to the fit of this shoe, all working in conjunction to provide both comfort and support. If you overpronate and are looking for some guidance, this may be the shoe for you.

$150; asicsamerica.com

Brooks Running

Brooks Dyad 7

Category: Neutral

Built for flat-footed runners, the Dyad is a neutral model that controls pronation via a straight last. Offering adequate volume and width to fit an orthotic, this shoe is perfect for wider feet whether you use an insert or not. Underfoot the shoe is flexible, thanks to special flex grooves in the outsole, but still offers plenty of cushioning via a dual-pod construction. Providing a unique feel compared to shoes with curved-lasts, the Dyad is worth a test run.

$110; brooksrunning.com

Mizuno

Mizuno Wave Alchemy 12

Category: Moderate stability

The Alchemy is perfect for wide-footed runners as a result of its wider platform and greater volume. If you’re looking for support without a lot of bulk, this model provides stability via a lightweight plastic wave in the midsole. Helping guide the foot from strike through toe-off, the wave system is a lighter weight alternative to dual density foam support. Although the Alchemy may not tip the scales as much as other models in the category, it provides comparable support, to be sure.

$115; mizunousa.com

Nike

Nike Zoom Structure+ 16

Category: Moderate Stability

One of Nike’s most popular running models, the Structure fits a wide variety of feet. Many wide-footed runners gravitate to its squared-off toe box. Adding to its appeal is a simple upper design devoid of plastic overlays across the toe box. Not only does the mesh allow for greater flex and give, it also makes these shoes supremely breathable. Offering lightweight cushioning and moderate arch support, this model is well suited to runners who want a moderate stability shoe that remains responsive and nimble.

$110; nike.com

Brooks Running

Brooks PureDrift

Category: Minimal

Thanks to shoes like the PureDrift, gone are the days when minimal models were only reserved for the narrow-footed, elite runner. With an extra-wide toe box to allow for the toes to splay, the PureDrift is well suited for wider feet. The light mesh upper also allows for some give, leaving a bit more volume for wide feet. In fact, many runners with standard-width feet need to go down a half-size in this model. Offering a zero-drop experience with some cushioning underfoot, the PureDrift provides an overall barely-there feel.

$100; brooksrunning.com

New Balance

New Balance Minimus 1010v2 Road or Trail

Category: Lightweight

A lightweight, cushioned shoe, the 1010v2 falls somewhere between traditional and barefoot running shoes. As part of the Minimus collection, these models feature a wide toe box to allow the toes to fully splay, perfect for someone with a wider foot. Complimenting the toe box is a sock-like fit, which will flex naturally and provide a bit of extra room for wide-footed runners. With a 4mm drop from heel to toe, the 1010v2 has taken on the barefoot ethos without going completely minimal.

$110; newbalance.com

Running Shoes for Wide Feet 2013