Platform 9 ¾, King’s Cross, London, England from Iconic Movie Destinations

Iconic Movie Destinations

Platform 9 ¾, King’s Cross, London, England

Flickr/andrewl04

Every avid Harry Potter fan knows where Platform 9 ¾ hides in King’s Cross Station. Once you’ve found the magical wall, grab your cart and push your way through. Hogwarts Express awaits. For more fun, a new Harry Potter gift shop was opened right by the platform. So stop in to find drawers full of magical wizarding gear. London itself is full of filming locations from the films. Now there is even a Warner Bros Studio Tour that takes you through the making of Harry Potter.

Hobbiton, The Alexander Farm, Matamata, New Zealand

Flickr/Jeff Hitchcock

Located in the rural town of Matamata lies every Lord of the Rings fan’s dream. When Peter Jackson saw The Alexander Farm, he knew it was the perfect spot for Hobbiton. Fans from all over the world come to Hobbiton to see the constructed hobbit holes, mills, bridges and that luscious green that made The Shire home. Now you can go on Hobbiton tours, or even stay at the farm where it lies.


Jurassic Falls, Manawaiopuna Falls, Kauai, Hawaii

Flickr/Julian Fong

There have been some huge blockbusters shot in Kauai, everything from Pirates of the Caribbean to Godzilla to The Descendents. But, the most famous of them all is definitely Jurassic Park. The Manawaiopuna Falls, commonly referred to as the Jurassic Falls, is a site to see for any fan of the movie. The only way to get to the site is to take a helicopter tour that will land you at the falls and give you time to explore.

The Beach, Maya Bay, Ko Phi Phi Lee, Thailand

Flickr/ccdoh1

After the 2000 movie, The Beach, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Maya Bay has become a popular movie buff destination for it’s gorgeous electric blue waters and white sand. There was some controversy during the making of the film, though. Apparently, 20th Century Fox did not think the natural beach was enough of a paradise, so they altered sand dunes and cleared trees and plants to widen the beach. After a lawsuit was brought to Thailand’s Supreme Court, it found that the production had harmed the environment. Despite all of this, the beach is a natural paradise, and after a 2004 tsunami, the water had cleaned up most of the landscaping left by Fox.


Bourne Wood, Farnham, Surrey, England

Flickr/Tim Sheerman

Bourne Wood has been used in many of the most well-known battle scenes of movies, including the opening battle in Gladiator. The list of films shot at one point in the forest seems endless, everything from Robin Hood to Harry Potter to Captain America. This location is exciting for any film buff, but especially those who want to see where Gladiator went down, since it was the first movie to film in this iconic location.

Philadelphia Museum of Art Steps, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Flickr/Alonso Javier Torres

Climb to the top of the Philadelphia Museum of Art Steps, more famously known as “The Rocky Steps” just like your favorite boxer. Like the movie Rocky, getting to the top is done through hard work and determination. Every year tens of thousands of people recreate the legendary scene at these steps. While in Philly, be sure to check out the Rocky Statue, as well, and see the bronze sculpture of Rocky Balboa standing tall.

The Goondocks, Astoria, Oregon

Flickr/popturf

This quaint little town attracts fans of the cult classic movie, The Goonies. Many of the houses and locations in town were used for production of the film. Head out to the Goonies house to do the Truffle Shuffle, or have an ice cream at the local bowling alley. Every year the town hosts a Goonies weekend celebration complete with treasure hunting, trivia and scavenger hunts. Check out the 30th annual celebration June 7, 2015, cast and crew members are planned to make an appearance.

Cypress Gardens, Moncks Corner, South Carolina

Flickr/Lee Nadelman

A stunning oasis sits quietly in a 170-acre preserve in South Carolina. Most notably, Cypress Gardens is recognized from the boat scene in The Notebook, but it has hosted a number of other films including, The Patriot, Cold Mountain, and Swamp Thing. The gardens are open daily, and you can take a boat out into the centerpiece of the preserve, the blackwater bald cypress/tupelo swamp, to relive what is debated to be one of the most romantic scenes in movie history.

Kirk’s Rock, Vasquez Rocks Natural Area Park, Sierra Pelona Mountains, California

Flickr/Brian Hicks

The park located up in the Sierra Pelona Mountains of the Los Angeles County houses some interesting rock formations. One formation in particular has its own cult following. Kirk’s Rock, the nickname for the prominent rock formation, was named in reference to Star Trek. Trekkies from around the world will come to check out where Kirk rolled a boulder onto reptile-alien, Gorn. The Vasquez Rocks are the backdrop to many other film and television productions including Power Rangers, New Girl, Friends, and the film Werewolf of London.

Field of Dreams, Lansing Family Farm, Dyersville, Iowa

Flickr/litlnemo

The Field of Dreams baseball field was built on family land in Dyersville, Iowa. After the film was done shooting, the field remained, and today fan’s come to see the ghost field in action. Every other sunday is ‘Ghost Sunday’ at the field, where local ‘ghosts’ emerge on the field to play America’s most beloved sports game. Because of the tourist attraction, the field is nicely maintained and has a small concession stand and gift shop for visitors.

Ta Phrom Temple, Angkor, Cambodia

Flickr/Steve Cornish

Built in the late 12th and early 13th century, the Ta Phrom Temple is home to surreal and sensational tree formations. The memorable, vivid scenery was used in shooting the film Tomb Raider. It really is unbelievable, the detailed and strange ways the trees have grown around the temple. The fantastical setting attracts movie buffs and adventure seekers alike and is one of Cambodia’s most-visited conservations.