Job Hunting? Build These 16 Skills at Home While You Search

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Resume Skills You Can Build at Home While Job Searching

Resume Skills You Can Build at Home While Job Searching

Beef up that resume
Job Hunting? Build These 16 Skills at Home While You Search

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As Americans continue to file unemployment claims at historic rates, more are job hunting more than usual. Refreshing your resume is a must-take step for anyone seeking new employment. 

This list features 16 skills – eight soft skills and eight hard skills. Soft job skills, listed first, are more comparable to personality traits. They have more to say about your social and personable capabilities in a work environment than anything else. Hard skills refer to specific technical knowledge and training. Develop these skills at home today to make you a better worker on the job tomorrow.

Adaptability

Adaptability

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Being an adaptable worker means adjusting well to changing work environments and rolling with any unexpected twists on the job. Given the ever-evolving nature of the coronavirus pandemic, many Americans have recently learned a valuable lesson in adaptability. Having to reorient your life under new precautions requires a flexibility that can be carried to a future workplace.

Motivation

Motivation

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Motivated employees push themselves to accomplish goals they would rather put off. Even if no one is watching, they staunchly tick off to-do list tasks one after another. Start by practicing this self-motivated ambition at home. Let each time you resist the urge to stream a happy show and take a DIY home project head-on be a reminder of all your progress.

Time management

Time management

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Like motivation, time management is another soft skill that requires self-control and discipline. Begin by putting your free time at home to good use by learning new recipes or developing fun new skills. Start with small steps, like limiting screen time, stepping away from distractions and setting a schedule. Then see how the learned discipline translates to your next job opportunity.

Organization

Organization

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Organizational skills are a beneficial asset for any functioning person. Before you are tasked with keeping a workspace in order, declutter your own home. Toss out untouched user manuals, tidy up the kitchen, organize financial documents and clear out closets. Don’t even get us started on your digital life and those 1,250 unread emails.

Networking

Networking

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Maintaining contact with loved ones, let alone career network contacts, during the coronavirus pandemic is difficult. But continue to check in with career mentors and colleagues. Do not be afraid to put LinkedIn and other networking apps to use as well.

Empathy

Empathy

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Empathy means understanding and sharing others’ feelings. An empathetic worker may better handle confrontation and correction and better navigate work relationships with toxic people. While job hunting, practice empathy in your home and in your community. Learning to lend others understanding can go further than you might think.

Willingness to learn

Willingness to learn

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Good employees can take constructive criticism. They are teachable and open-minded. While on the hunt for a new job, practice these skills with near ones. Continuing to learn and grow through life is one healthy habit that keeps you young.

Communication

Communication

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Communication is key to all relationships in and out of the workplace. Learn to clearly express your opinions and thoughts in conversation with others. Whether this means overcoming shyness, controlling a quick temper or expressing gratitude more often, do what it takes to be a better communicator. 

Writing

Writing

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Now, we move on to the hard skills, the first of which is writing. Written communication rules some career fields. Learn to craft an email or write a memo. Prove your written skills are more than just talk. Make sure to check your resume for any typos or grammatical errors, one of several resume red flags.

Language

Language

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Understanding more than one language can be an incalculable asset to job seekers. Take the free time to learn a foreign language. Immerse yourself in the language and the culture that surrounds it. Write it, speak it and read it.

Web development

Web development

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Spoken languages are not the only languages you can learn. In the past decade, coding has become an especially lucrative skillset. Consider learning an entry-level coding language like HTML and CSS. There are several online courses, tutorials and games to help you learn the necessary web building tools.

Computer technology

Computer technology

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Computer technology may require some previous experience, however, several founders of the world’s biggest businesses got their start just tinkering with whatever they could find in their garages and basements. For the more apprehensive, purchasable kits could make for a better transition into computer tech.

Design

Design

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Interested in pursuing design for a living or at least increasing your knowledge? Invest in software or practice programs. Purchase whichever sort fits in your budget or look for free alternatives. Share all your creations with friends and family and learn to take constructive feedback. Then, list all your mastered programs at the bottom of your one-page resume.

Fundamental mathematics

Fundamental mathematics

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Relax. No one is suggesting you master calculus or the particulars of mathematical physics. Just brush up on the fundamental mathematics necessary for whichever career you choose. If need be, turn to any children or teens in your life for help. They might just have the basics covered. 

SEO

SEO

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Though not as universally applicable as writing, language or even math, search engine optimization (SEO) is integral to several growing industries. Learning what the world is searching and why can help you better market whatever your next gig requires.