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Quarantine Haircuts: How To Cut Your Hair At Home According To A Beautician

Quarantine Haircuts: How To Cut Your Hair At Home According To A Beautician

The hair trimming tips you need

 

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Because of coronavirus restrictions and closures, it’s been months since most Americans have had their hair cut or trimmed by a professional. Many stylists have taken to Zoom or Facetime to teach their clients how to properly cut their hair, but for those without access to their beautician or barber, shaggy hair, split ends and dry hair have become the norm. 

If your hair has started to show signs of breakage, it might be time to invest in the proper tools and give your hair the trim it needs. 

We spoke with Jenica Brooks, a stylist at the Relax, She’s Natural styling salon who specializes in healthy hair, curly locks and bold colors to determine how you should cut your home at home. Brooks recommends at-home hair trimming for maintenance purposes only. 

Identify when you need a trim

Identify when you need a trim

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Just as there are signs that can help anyone predict the weather, your hair will also tell you when it’s in need of a trim. “If you find single strand knots, your ends are dry, rough and breaking, you have excessive shedding of strands that are shorter in length, or your hair tangles easily even when it has shampoo or conditioner in it, you’re in need of a trim,” said Brooks.

Don’t use any old scissors lying around the house

Don’t use any old scissors lying around the house

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Save the scissors you keep in your kitchen drawer for your crafty hobbies. It’s important not to use any old scissors you find around the house to trim your hair. “Please do not use safety scissors, crafting scissors or garden shears,” said Brooks.

Instead, invest in proper hair tools

Instead, invest in proper hair tools

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So you’ve decided to give your hair a much-needed trim to revive dry locks and eliminate pesky split ends. Before beginning any DIY cut, it’s important to invest in the proper tools. “You should have cutting shears, a comb, hair clips and a detangling brush on hand,” said Brooks.

Wash your hair

Wash your hair

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Your hair might look better in the mirror a day or two after it’s been washed, but, according to Brooks, your hair shouldn’t be dirty when you decide to trim it. “Your trim should always be done on freshly cleansed hair,” said Brooks. Change or clean your hairbrush and hairdryer if they appear dirty before use.

Don’t add any extra products to your hair before trimming

Don’t add any extra products to your hair before trimming

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If you’re a fan of adding oils or other products to style your hair, save it for after the cut. “Your hair should be clean and have nothing more than your favorite leave-in conditioner or, if you’re straightening it, heat protectant spray [before trimming],” said Brooks.

Detangling is key

Detangling is key

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Whether you decide to cut your hair while it’s wet or dry, it’s always important to detangle your hair before you begin the trimming process. According to Brooks, when the hair is thoroughly detangled, you’re guaranteed a more even trim.

If you’re comfortable with cutting shears, opt for blown-out or dried straight hair

If you’re comfortable with cutting shears, opt for blown-out or dried straight hair

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If you’ve trimmed hair in the past — whether it be a Halloween wig or a Barbie doll – and you feel comfortable with a pair of cutting shears in your hand, cutting your hair after it’s been blow-dried is one way to trim your hair. “Cutting your hair after it’s been stretched, blown out or dried straight is the most effective way to go about trimming,” said Brooks. “But it does require one to be a bit more comfortable in manipulating their hair.”

If this is your first DIY trim, opt for cutting it in its natural state

If this is your first DIY trim, opt for cutting it in its natural state

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On the other hand, if DIY isn’t your middle name and you’re used to seeing a beautician or barber every few weeks, Brooks suggests cutting your hair while it’s still wet or, for people with curly or wavy hair, dried in its natural state. “When you’re in need of a trim but you’re not familiar or comfortable with manipulating your hair, cut it while it’s in its natural state,” said Brooks. “Twist two strands of hair together and cut the ends.”

Always separate hair into sections before cutting

Always separate hair into sections before cutting

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Like many other fun new skills, it takes time to properly trim your hair. And whether if you have long tresses or you’re rocking a shorter look, it’s better to be patient than to go scissor crazy. According to Brooks, sectioning your hair before cutting is pertinent to achieving the desired look.  “Sectioning is important as it affects the outcome of your trim,” said Brooks. “Separate the hair by sectioning from ear to ear going across the top of the head from one ear to the other. You’re essentially separating the front and back of the head.”

But part hair into four sections if you’re using the two-strand twist method

But part hair into four sections if you’re using the two-strand twist method

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For individuals trimming their hair in its natural state, Brooks recommends dividing the hair into four quadrants for an easier process rather than attempting to tackle the head as a whole. “You’ll be left with two sections in the front of the head and two in the back,” said Brooks. “Start in the back of the head in either of the two subsections and part horizontally roughly an inch from the nape. You will then proceed to twist.”

Use tension when trimming

Use tension when trimming

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For an even look, Brooks advises DIY trimmers to evenly stretch the hair away from the scalp when trimming. “Remember to use tension to ensure all of the hair is evenly stretched for a more precise cut,” said Brooks.

Keep hair angled low

Keep hair angled low

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“Be sure to pull the hair taught, keeping it angled low so as to not create heavy layering,” said Brooks.

Trim parallel to the parting

Trim parallel to the parting

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According to Brooks, how you decide to section your hair should dictate the angle you hold your shears before you trim. “If you are making horizontal partings, you will trim with the shears angled horizontally,” said Brooks. “And if you are making vertical partings, you will trim with the shears held vertically. Your shears should always be held parallel to the parting.”

Work from the nape of your neck to the crown of your head

Work from the nape of your neck to the crown of your head

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Instead of trimming hair randomly as you go, Brooks suggests establishing a routine by starting from the nape, or your neck hairline, and working your way to the crown, or the top of your head.

Trim the same amount for each section

Trim the same amount for each section

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If you’re not aiming to chop your hair into an asymmetrical bop or outdated fashion look, try to take off the same amount for each section. “If you remove, for example, half an inch, do your best to remove that same amount each time for best results,” said Brooks. “You can see if you’re trimming symmetrically by using previously trimmed sections from the opposite side of the head.”

Thin ends should be trimmed

Thin ends should be trimmed

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Examining the density of your ends is one of the best ways to determine how much of your hair is in need of a trim. “If you need to decide the correct amount to trim, keep an eye out for where the hair begins to naturally become thinner and see-through,” said Brooks. “The density of your ends is an indicator of what needs to be removed.”

Ends that curl differently should also be cut

Ends that curl differently should also be cut

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If you have wavy or curly hair and decide to trim it in its natural state, you can tell how much hair should be cut by the curl pattern. “You will notice the ends of your hair curls differently than the rest of your hair,” said Brooks. “That is a great indicator of how much of the ends need to go.”

Routinely cross-check how much you’ve cut

Routinely cross-check how much you’ve cut

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Make it a habit to check how much of your hair you’ve cut. Routinely compare your hair to other sections that have already been cut to guarantee the style is even and smooth.

If you cut too much, leave it as is

If you cut too much, leave it as is

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If you get distracted by your favorite show on Netflix or Hulu and accidentally chop a section of your hair more than you intended, don’t try to fix the damage by trimming the remainder of your hair to match. “Do not attempt to blend, or correct as you can make it worse,” said Brooks. “I suggest leaving the section of hair that has been cut too short as is and to cross-check throughout the cut to avoid taking off too much again.”

Utilize the point cutting technique when trimming bangs

Utilize the point cutting technique when trimming bangs

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We’ve all read the horror stories of individuals who either accidentally cut their bangs too short. To avoid this mistake, Brook suggests using a technique called point cutting to achieve a beauty-salon-worthy look. “Section and separate your bang from the rest of the hair and hold your shears perpendicular to the section of hair that is being trimmed,” said Brooks. “Take small horizontal partings, hold shears perpendicular to the sectioned hair and point cut. This method removes length and weight, leaving your bangs to have a softer fall, with no harsh blunt lines.”

Protect your ends

Protect your ends

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Seeing brittle or split ends after you’ve spent hours indoors mastering your ideal haircut is disheartening. Strive to protect your ends by sealing them with a moisturizer or light oil.

Moisturize your hair

Moisturize your hair

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Maintaining healthy hair after your trim is similar to growing a garden. It requires time, care, love, and the necessary nutrients — like water and moisturizers — to thrive. To retain healthy hair after your trim, Brooks recommends moisturizing your hair whenever possible. “You can moisturize your hair daily with your favorite leave-in conditioner,” said Brooks. For more extensive treatment, try deep conditioning. “After you shampoo your hair, deep condition with your favorite moisturizing mask for 30 minutes, be it weekly or bi-weekly.”

If you notice excessive damage, try low manipulation styles

If you notice excessive damage, try low manipulation styles

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When you’re constantly brushing, combing or yanking at your hair, you’re bound to see breakage. And during harsh weather, your hair has a higher risk of fraying. For those with longer hair, Brooks recommends trying low manipulation hairstyles, like buns or braids, to tuck your ends way.

Protect your hair at night

Protect your hair at night

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Investing in good sheets and comfortable pillows are ways to make your room better for a good night’s rest. Satin pillowcases will keep you cool and keep your hair from becoming tangled or dry after your trim and beyond. “Protect your hair nightly with a satin pillowcase,” said Brooks. “[There are also] satin scarves and bonnets.”

Remember, patience is a virtue

Remember, patience is a virtue

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Be kind and patient with yourself. It’s okay to make mistakes, but for a successful outcome, take your time with your locks. Once you’ve mastered maintaining your DIY look, try these DIY home maintenance tips.

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