This is What Saturated Fats Actually Do to Your Body from This is What Saturated Fats Actually Do to Your Body

This is What Saturated Fats Actually Do to Your Body

Shutterstock

This is What Saturated Fats Actually Do to Your Body

Shutterstock

A lot of myths and misconceptions are associated with saturated fats. Many people believe that they are bad for your health – they cause heart disease, high cholesterol and clog your arteries. The truth is that many of the “facts” you hear couldn’t be further from the truth.

*Related: Healthy High-Fat Foods You SHOULD Be Eating

Fatty meat, coconut oil, butter, and cream are some of the many dietary sources of saturated fat. Coconut oil specifically has proven to have many health benefits. The saturated fat content has been shown to support your brain, skin, immune system, heart, and thyroid.

Increase Bone Strength

Shutterstock

As we get older the risk of broken bones and fractures increases. “It has been found that in order for calcium to be incorporated into bone the body needs saturated fat,” Michelle Roots, resident fitness expert and trainer for Trainerize says.

Keep Your Brain Healthy

Shutterstock

The neurons in your brain need nutrients – saturated fats – to function properly. “The brain is made of majority fat and cholesterol,” Roots explains. It “needs saturated fat in order to function optimally.”

Immune System Strength

Shutterstock

“Our white blood cells are responsible for recognizing and attacking foreign invaders (viruses, bacteria etc.) and need sufficient saturated fatty acids to perform at their best,” Roots says. Some foods that help boost your immune system include coconut oil, citrus fruits, turmeric, and green tea.

Heart Health

Shutterstock

Maintaining a healthy blood pressure, getting a good night’s sleep and reducing stress are just some of the many ways to prevent heart disease. Roots says that adding “saturated fat in the diet will keep the heart healthy and decrease the risk of heart disease” as well.

Liver Function

Shutterstock

Research has shown that saturated fats help the liver function more effectively. “Common understanding is that saturated fat intake helps protect the liver from alcohol and medications,” Roots says.

Improved Nerve Firing

Shutterstock

Roots explains that “nerve signals to tell organs and glands what to do are improved with incorporation of saturated fats in the diet.”

Increases HDL cholesterol

Shutterstock

HDL is known as “good cholesterol,” Roots explains. “Increasing saturated fat intake will in turn decrease the chance of heart disease.” Some foods that naturally lower cholesterol include fatty fish, dark chocolate, avocados, and grapefruit.

Reduces Food Cravings

Shutterstock

"Eating more saturated fat each day will leave you feeling more full and satisfied after each meal,” Roots says. This “leading to less cravings and most likely less unnecessary snacking.”

Help Build Hormones

Shutterstock

Saturated fats from animal and vegetable sources help to provide a variety of hormones and hormone-like substances, Dr. Mercola explains. “They also act as carriers for fat-soluble vitamins, and are required for mineral absorption and for a host of other biological processes.”

Healthy Lungs

Shutterstock

Your lungs are coated with a lubricant-like substance, which helps your lungs expand and contract, according to atkins.com. “Saturated fat intake helps provide a layer inside the lungs of fatty acids which will keep the lungs functioning properly,” Roots says.

Increased Energy Levels

Shutterstock

“Good fat intake will provide the body with sustained energy than a higher glycemic carbohydrate,” Roots says. For instance, the medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) that are found in coconut oil have been known to provide a great energy source for the body.

Enhance Weight Loss

Shutterstock

Some saturated fat is associated with a faster metabolism, ATKINS explains. “It helps improve nerve signaling within your body, which affects the functioning of your hormones and your ability to burn fat.”