The Surprising Secrets to a Good Night’s Sleep

The Surprising Secrets to a Good Night’s Sleep

The surprising secrets to a good night’s sleep

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The surprising secrets to a good night’s sleep

The surprising secrets to a good night’s sleep

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Everyone at some point in their lives will find it hard to go to sleep at night. The medicine you take, your daily schedule and your diet can have a big impact on your sleep, according to sleepeducation.org. If you have difficulty sleeping or want to improve your sleep, try these tips.

Keep a sleep log or schedule

Keep a sleep log or schedule

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Get up at the same time every day, and on weekends or during vacations. This helps to regulate your body’s clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night. Life will inevitably interfere, but try not to sleep in for more than two hours at the most on weekends.

Get at least 7 hours of sleep

Get at least 7 hours of sleep

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While sleep requirements vary slightly from person to person, most healthy adults need 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night to be at their best. Children and teens need even more

Don’t go to bed unless you are sleepy

Don’t go to bed unless you are sleepy

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If sleep hasn’t come within 20 minutes, get back out of bed. 

Don’t take stress to bed with you

Don’t take stress to bed with you

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The National Sieep Foundation suggest you develop a relaxing pre-sleep ritual

Get some exercise

Get some exercise

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According to the Sleep Foundation, as little as 10 minutes of exercise can dramatically improve your sleep.

Remove electronic devices from the bedroom

Remove electronic devices from the bedroom

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And turn off electronic devices at least 30 minutes before bedtime.

Make sure your bedroom is cool

Make sure your bedroom is cool

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A cool room helps promote restful sleep. Program the thermostat so the bedroom’s temperature is between 60 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit. Find the temperature that's right for you.

Use your bed only for sleep and sex

Use your bed only for sleep and sex

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Use your bed the way it should be used – no work, phone time, etc.

Don’t eat a large meal before bedtime

Don’t eat a large meal before bedtime

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If you are hungry at night, eat a light, healthy snack.

Avoid consuming caffeine in the late afternoon or evening

Avoid consuming caffeine in the late afternoon or evening

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Instead brew some chamomile tea, or warm milk.

Avoid consuming alcohol before bedtime

Avoid consuming alcohol before bedtime

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Alcohol may confuse your body, according to the Sleep Foundation. You may doze off quickly, only to wake up in the middle of the night.

Try soothing music

Try soothing music

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Slow tunes are ideal. Music can slow your heart rate and breathing.

Take a bath or shower

Take a bath or shower

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Going from a warm shower into your cool bedroom can help put you to sleep.

Try meditation

Try meditation

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Not only can meditation improve your sleep, but it may also help reduce blood pressure, anxiety and depression, according to the Sleep Foundation.

Minimize external noises

Minimize external noises

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If external noises are beyond your control, try a white noise machine.

Increase time outside

Increase time outside

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Increasing natural light exposure during the day can help you get to sleep later in the day.
 

If you’re going to nap, do it right

If you’re going to nap, do it right

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Harvard Medical School recommends short naps taken before 5 p.m.

Don’t light up

Don’t light up

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According to the National Institutes of Health, smokers may have trouble sleeping because of the stimulant effects of nicotine, nightly withdrawal and breathing problems caused by smoking.

Buy the right mattress for you

Buy the right mattress for you

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People spend a third of their lives in bed, which means it’s vital that you also spend plenty of time choosing the right mattress. 

Consult a professional

Consult a professional

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If nothing helps with your insomnia, it might be time to talk to your doctor. Harvard Medical School points out that sleep disorders are usually chronic and may lead to other health problems.