Chewing gum from Simple Hacks to Relax in 2017

Simple Hacks to Relax in 2017

Numerous studies have proven the impact that slowing down and relaxing can have on people’s lives. Science has shown that calming can relieve symptoms of anxiety, depression, and insomnia - and can alleviate actual pain from numerous medial ailments. Everyone has to deal with stress. It’s a natural part of life, and while most don’t find pleasure in the tensions and pressures of everyday life, a little bit of stress can actually be good for you. It’s when stress becomes persistent (or chronic) that it can begin to negatively affect your health.

Chewing gum

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A study analyzed a total of 2,248 gum chewers and non-chewers and measured a variety of indicators related to chewing gum, stress and health. Results showed that chewers were significantly more likely than non-chewers to report less extreme stress at both work and in life, and lower levels of feeling depressed. Other research showed that the more gum the students chewed, the lower the levels of stress they reported.

Deep breathing

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Take a deep breath. Pause for a second or two. Exhale slowly. Do the same exercise a few times. You’ve done your nervous system a great favor, and many studies have shown that. Focused breathing is the one “Super Stress Buster” that evokes the relaxation response that the American Institute of Stress widely recommends as useful for everyone, even kids. Separate research has also shown that slow controlled breathing is associated with lower blood pressure and heart rate.

Drink some tea

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In a study, green tea consumption was inversely associated with psychological distress even after adjustment for possible confounding factors. Trials suggest that tea consumption or supplementation with L-theanine, which is a constituent of green tea, reduces responses to acute psychological stress. L-theanine, which is found in most teas, is a relaxing and non-dietary amino acid, known to promote relaxation.

Laugh it out

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“Humor and laughing are super healing in general,” John Kalinowski, life coach and mindfulness expert, says. “I always try to keep people around me who I can laugh with, and who bring that out in me,” he adds. But even if such people are not around at the moment, “there’s always something funny on television or a funny book to read.” Try the internet as well. “Unless we’re living on a desert island, we have options. If we’re looking for it, we will find it.”

Go to a park

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Spending time in a park is one of the best ways to cope better with stress, feel happier and have more self-esteem, according to research. Other studies have shown that walking in green spaces can put the brain in a state of meditation. Be among flowers. A study showed that patients in hospital rooms with flowers needed less pain medication, were less tired, and had lower blood pressure. 

Start cleaning

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Remove as many little messes from your life as possible. By cleaning your life up, you will clear your cluttered mind. These will be things such as clearing out your closets of all the clothes you haven't worn for two years, shredding all the statements and paperwork you don't need anymore, and removing the clutter from your kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Eliminating these distractions and messes from your life is like untangling a knot inside of you.

Have some dark chocolate

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Some research has shown that dark chocolate may play a role in regulating stress hormones. What’s more, cocoa contains immune-boosting antioxidants that likely play a role in supporting cardiovascular health. According to Health Magazine, the cocoa in dark chocolate can trigger a relaxation effect in the walls of your blood vessels, which lowers blood pressure and improves circulation. Plus, new research shows that this sweet treat may even be able to provide a mid-day energy boost.

Stretch

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Stretching helps you deal with stress and reduce pain by releasing the buildup of tension in your muscles. It also keeps you flexible so your body can move in many ways. Breathe in and out through your nose for a relaxing effect on the nervous system. Add a little strength training and stretching two to three times a week and you'll have an excellent, balanced program for health and stress reduction, according to Harvard Medical School.

Start planning your next vacation

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Yoga reduces stress levels, according to many studies. By reducing perceived stress and anxiety, yoga appears to modulate stress response systems. This decreases physiological stimulation — reducing the heart rate, lowering blood pressure, and easing respiration. Yoga also helps increase heart rate variability, which is an indicator of the body’s ability to respond to stress better.

Yoga

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Scientific research on “Om” chanting suggests that the mental repetition of “Om” results in physiological alertness and increased sensitivity. Daily meditation is the foundation to keep stress under control, Annie Lin from New York Life Coaching says. “Fifteen minutes a day is a good start. It’s like taking shower for the mind. Otherwise the dust/stress accumulates easily.”

Meditation

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Looking forward to something is an exciting feeling. Planning such event can only boost your happiness and research supports that theory. Keeping your mind active and preoccupied with joyful concerns keeps stress and sadness away. The important aspect is to be concentrated on something that brings you positive emotions.

Simple Hacks to Relax in 2017