Hidden Dangers Summer Can Bring to Pets from Hidden Dangers Summer Can Bring to Pets

Hidden Dangers Summer Can Bring to Pets

Pets enjoy the summertime; after all, warmer weather does mean more time spent outdoors. While we want to give our pets the freedom to have fun, it’s important to take precaution. The truth is that there are quite a few health hazards you, as a pet parent, need to be on the lookout for.

Related: How Owning a Pet Makes You Healthier

Heat stroke

shutterstock

If you want to be a responsible pet parent and do everything you can to keep your pets cool in the summer heat, know how to protect them from a heatstroke. If your dog is excessively panting, this may be a sign that he or she is overheating. According to the Humane Society, if your pet is suffering from a heatstroke you should move him or her into the shade or air conditioned area, then apply cold towels or icepacks to their head, neck and chest. Make sure they drink small amounts of cool water or lick ice cubs, then take him/her directly to the veterinarian.

Sunburn

istockphoto.com

Just because your pet has body full of fur doesn’t mean that they can’t get sunburned. They are susceptible to the same damage from UV rays humans are. Use a pet sunscreen to protect them from the damage of the sun’s rays. Try a Petkin Doggy Sunstick or a Coola Pet Sunscreen Spray.

Other animals

shutterstock

Pets like to explore, especially during the warmer months. It’s important to watch them at all times, as other animals may pose as a threat – stray cats, wild animals, spiders, bees. They may be lurking in the bushes waiting for your pet to get to close enough to attack.

Sidewalks

shutterstock

Avoid walking your pet on hot pavement, it can burn their paws. Also be careful when walking on asphalt and sand, it can get so hot that it burns your pets paws. Also, they are walking much closer to the ground than you, so it is hotter and the heat is reaching them much faster than it reaches you.

Allergies

shutterstock

Just like people, your pet may suffer from seasonal allergies. WebMD says that some symptoms of allergies in dogs include increased scratching, itchy and runny eyes, sneezing, constant licking, and swollen paws. It’s important to take precaution, as they may also bring allergens into your home. Make sure you wash and brush your pets regularly; cat and dog fur is perfect for trapping pollen.

Pools

istockphoto.com

When your pet begins to show signs of heat exhaustion, your first thought is to cool them down; you may take them for a dip in your family pool. Never assume that your pet can swim, and take precaution because if they drink from the pool the chlorine will make him or her sick, and it may also irritate your pet’s eyes.

Cars

shutterstock

Cars pose a couple of summer dangers to pets. First and foremost, never leave  your pet in a parked car, even if your windows are cracked; this will not stop the temperature from rising in the car. Secondly, accidents involving pets are more common due to the fact that we tend to let our pets outside more often in the summer months. Statistics show that in the U.S. about 1.2 million dogs and 5.4 million cats are killed on the roads each year.

Heartworms, ticks and fleas

istockphoto.com

Although they may not cause heatstroke, you should constantly be checking your pet for heartworms, fleas and ticks. Heartworms can be fatal for cats and dogs if untreated. Keep your dogs away from wooded areas and don’t take them on any wilderness adventures in the summertime.

Standing water puddles

shutterstock

After a rainy day when your pet is ready to go outside and walk around, make sure you are keeping your eyes on them. If you see your pet splashing around in a water puddle or drinking the water make sure you stop them immediately. Bacteria living in the water can be hazardous to your pet’s health.

Insecticides

istockphoto.com

Insecticides are used to kill insects, and while this may help the areas outside of your home that are prone to ticks and fleas, you should never allow your dog or cat to be exposed. Look out for fever, vomiting, seizures, muscle tremors, and lack of coordination if you suspect that your dog is unwell because of insecticides.

Fertilizers

shutterstock

As we strive to attain the perfect green lawn, we must remember that we may be potentially harming our dogs and cats; fertilizers contain a variety of dangerous chemicals. Pay close attention to your pet; if he or she is drooling, vomiting, having difficulty breathing, and nauseous, you will definitely want to seek medical attention.

Toxic plants and flowers

istockphoto.com

Every summer countless people become concerned that their pet may have eaten a poisonous plant or flower. The Pet Poison Helpline advises you to keep your pets from getting to close to some flowers – Azaleas, Cyclamen, Kalanchoe, Oleander, and even some Lilies. Some plants to avoid include Dieffenbachia and Sago Palm.

Hot sand

shutterstock

Ever walk on the beach barefoot and start jumping around because the sand is burning your feet? Imagine how your dog feels. Hot sand can burn your pet’s paw pads. Make sure to walk them along the water or purchase a set of booties to protect them.

Hidden Dangers Summer Can Bring to Pets