2018’s Best & Worst Cities for Keeping Your New Year’s Resolutions from 2018’s Best & Worst Cities for Keeping Your New Year’s Resolutions

2018’s Best & Worst Cities for Keeping Your New Year’s Resolutions

2018’s Best & Worst Cities for Keeping Your New Year’s Resolutions

To determine where Americans are most likely to stick to their goals for 2018, WalletHub considered some of the most popular (and most commonly broken) resolutions to rank more than 180 U.S. cities based on their conduciveness to self-improvement.

Best: Seattle, Washington

Best: Seattle, Washington

Shutterstock

Seattle made it to the top because of high marks across the board. It’s second in health resolutions, which takes into consideration share of obese adults, share of people not exercising and access to exercise opportunities. The Emerald City is also fourth in the relationship resolutions category and fifth when it comes to setting new financial goals.

Best: San Francisco, California

Best: San Francisco, California

Shutterstock

San Francisco has the third lowest number of obese adults and the third highest median credit score. It’s tied at fourth place for the lowest percentage of adult smokers. Also, the city is fifth in the “most restaurants per capita” category. It’s no wonder keeping your New Year resolutions won’t be so difficult.

Best: San Diego, California

Best: San Diego, California

Shutterstock

San Diego didn’t get a very high “financial resolutions” rank but it did get the No. 1 spot in terms of health resolutions and No. 8 in relationships. The beautiful city did make the list of the best places to go for a winter break.

Best: Scottsdale, Arizona

Best: Scottsdale, Arizona

Shutterstock

It’s good to live in Scottsdale if you want your resolutions to last for longer than a few weeks, especially if they have a lot to do with money. The city has the fifth highest median annual income in the study. If you want to spend more time in parks, you’re in luck because Scottsdale has the third most parkland acres per capita.

Best: Salt Lake City, Utah

Best: Salt Lake City, Utah

Shutterstock

If you want to stop smoking – and you should really quit the nasty habit – living in Salt Lake City may be a good idea. It has the second lowest percentage of adult smokers (after San Jose, California), so you won’t really see many people tempting you.

Best: San Jose, California

Best: San Jose, California

Shutterstock

San Jose is a good place to be if you’re focusing on quitting bad habits and on improving your health. The city ranks very highly in both categories. It’s also in the Top 15 when it comes to financial resolutions.  

Best: Orlando, Florida

Best: Orlando, Florida

Shutterstock

If your New Year’s resolutions have anything to do with food, Orlando is a good place to live. It has highest number of restaurants per capita (tied with New York in this category).

Best: Irvine, California

Best: Irvine, California

Shutterstock

Irvine is among the very best in several categories: Second in “lowest percentage of obese adults,” second in “lowest percentage of adults not exercising,” second in highest share of public schools rated with above average score,” fourth in “highest median credit score,” and is tied in first in “lowest unemployment rate.”

Best: Austin, Texas

Best: Austin, Texas

Shutterstock

Being able to stick to your New Year’s resolutions has just joined the long list of reasons to love Austin. It has among the lowest unemployment rates in the study. The city ranks third in the “school and work resolutions” category.

Best: Portland, Oregon

Best: Portland, Oregon

Shutterstock

Few people in Portland are not exercising, according to the data, which most likely has a lot to do with why health resolutions are not hard to achieve. It makes a lot of sense to want to work out when you see everyone around you doing so. Locals making relationship resolutions also won’t have a hard time sticking to them –Portland ranked sixth in the category.

Worst: Columbus, Georgia

Worst: Columbus, Georgia

Shutterstock

Columbus ranked 173 out of 182 cities in the data that take 52 key metrics into account, ranging from adult obesity to income growth and employment outlook. The “get out of debt” resolution is both the most popular and the most frequently broken.

Worst: Hialeah, Florida

Worst: Hialeah, Florida

Shutterstock

Hialeah finished near the bottom of the list, ranking 174 out of 180. The city’s score was weighed down by an overall lack of exercise among adults and park acres per person. Also, the fact that Hialeah ranked last for lowest median income did not help.

Worst: Mobile, Alabama

Worst: Mobile, Alabama

Shutterstock

The only category in which Mobile scored somewhat fairly is relationships – 117 out of 182. The city ranked the worst when it comes to health resolutions and breaking bad habits – 170 and 172, respectively.

Worst: Montgomery, Alabama

Worst: Montgomery, Alabama

Shutterstock

Montgomery’s best score – 125 out of 182 – was in the “bad habits resolutions” category. They include binge and heavy drinking and smoking.  The category also considers access to opioids, overdose deaths, and share of adults with gambling disorders and inadequate sleep.

Worst: Augusta, Georgia

Worst: Augusta, Georgia

Shutterstock

New Year’s resolutions are hard for Augustans to keep. Augusta is the sixth worst city. Residents’ rankings in other categories were: health, 179, relationships, 158, and bad habits, 147.

Worst: Detroit, Michigan

Worst: Detroit, Michigan

f11photo / Shutterstock.com

Detroit is among the cities with the highest percentage of obese adult people, lowest median annual income, lowest median credit score, lowest share of public schools rated with and above average score, highest unemployment rate, and highest percentage of adult smokers.

Worst: Jackson, Mississippi

Worst: Jackson, Mississippi

Shutterstock

The low average median credit score is bringing Jackson down. Few people are exercising in the city, which also contributes to its low overall ranking. Consequently, Jackson has the second highest percentage of obese adults in all 182 cities included in the study.

Worst: Newark, New Jersey

Worst: Newark, New Jersey

Shutterstock

Newark is the only city doing worse in terms of its population staying active and exercising than Jackson, Mississippi. The Brick City is not doing well financially either. It ranks third and fourth in lowest median annual income and lowest median credit score, respectively.

Worst: Shreveport, Louisiana

Worst: Shreveport, Louisiana

Shutterstock

When it comes to discipline, resolve and stick-to-it-tivness, people in Shreveport are near the bottom – 171st in percentage of obese adults, 138th in most gyms per capita, 93rd in average monthly fitness club fee, 177th in percentage of delinquent debtors, 162nd  in job opportunities, 164th  in income growth, and 32nd in binge and heavy drinking.

Worst: Gulfport, Mississippi

Worst: Gulfport, Mississippi

iStock

Gulfport is the worst in America at keeping New Year's resolutions, according to the survey. Locals were best at keeping the "School and Work" resolutions, but scored painfully low on most of the rest. Gulfport is among cities with the highest percentage of adults not exercising. Only Laredo, Texas ranked lower.