The best hammock

From bestreviews.com
By
Adam Reeder
BestReviews

Hammocks have been used by humans for resting for over a millennium.

If you're the kind of person who revels in life's simple joys, then you should have your own hammock. If you're not? Then you really need a hammock. Basically, a hammock is one of those pleasures no one should be without.

Hammocks can either stretch between two trees or hang on their own frame, making them mobile and convenient. The best part about resting in a hammock is the full sensory experience that it offers. You can feel the breeze, smell the flowers, and hear the birds while you drift off into hours of restful slumber (unless that is, you have children).

To learn more, read our buying guide below. Our top pick is the Vivere Double Hammock, which is comfortable as well as durable.

Considerations when choosing hammocks

Hammock stand

Sometimes you just don't have those two perfect trees for suspending your hammock. That's when a hammock stand saves the day. You can either purchase a hammock that comes with a stand or get one separately. When shopping for a hammock, consider whether you plan to use a stand at any time in the future, and make sure that model can accommodate it.

Capacity

While most hammocks are designed for use by one person, there are now options available for tandem napping. If you want to enjoy your hammock with one or more people, then look for one with a multiperson capacity. Then you can snap the perfect pic of you and your friends, before tumbling out like newborn puppies.

Hammock style

There are almost too many hammock styles to name but that won't stop us from trying: rope, camping, Mayan, poolside, quilted, Nicaraguan, and Brazillian are some of the most popular. The differences between each have a lot to do with the type of weaving and the assembly. Whatever your needs, there's a hammock style for you.

Features

Spreader bar

As the name would suggest, a spreader bar is the bar (usually made of wood) at either end of the hammock that ensures that the fabric remains open when you lie down. Some hammocks have them and some don't. A good spreader bar will help you avoid the dreaded "human burrito effect." The way the spreader bar holds the fabric can impact comfort as well, so take notice of the design.

Color

There is an infinite number of color and design options available for hammock shoppers. Whether you want a bright striped design or a subdued solid, it should be easy to find something that matches your personal style.

Hammock prices

If you spend around $30, you can get a rope hammock that will do the job, although it probably won't last as long as a more expensive alternative. If your budget is between $60 and $80, then you can likely find either a Nicaraguan, Brazillian, or Mayan hammock. These will last longer than the standard rope hammock. If you're able to buy a hammock in the range of $100 to $200, it will be a long-lasting one that you'll be able to enjoy for years to come.

FAQ

Q. How do I hang my hammock between trees without a stand?

A. You will likely need to buy tree-hanging straps for your hammock. Hammocks with spreader bars should be hung taught. Ones without spreader bars need to be hung closer together so that they can swing properly.

Q. What kind of materials are hammocks made from?

A. Most hammocks are either made from rope, cotton, or polyester. There are some other synthetic options available, but these three are what you will find most often.

Q. How do I know if I'm too heavy for a hammock?

A. Every hammock comes with its own weight specifications, and each one is designed to carry a specified amount of weight. Check the specifications of the hammock you want to buy and compare them to your own weight. Heavy-duty hammocks are available in many styles for bigger weight loads.

Hammocks we recommend

Best of the best: Vivere Double Hammock

Our take: Worth every penny when you consider the quality and comfort you get for your money.

What we like: The well-designed frame means that the hammock takes up very little space.

What we dislike: It's not quite stable enough for two full-grown adults.

Best bang for your buck: Hammocks Rada Handmade Yucatan

Our take: A durable hand-woven hammock at a reasonable price.

What we like: One of the most all-around comfortable hammocks on the market.

What we dislike: The thin weave can tangle and twist, making it difficult to put back.

Choice 3: Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest

Our take: Takes a licking and keeps on hanging.

What we like: Stainless steel snap-links help keep the hammock secure, and the durable synthetic material will last a long time.

What we dislike: Carabiners are not as strong as they could be.

Adam Reeder is a writer for BestReviews. BestReviews is a product review company with a singular mission: to help simplify your purchasing decisions and save you time and money. BestReviews never accepts free products from manufacturers and purchases every product it reviews with its own funds.

BestReviews spends thousands of hours researching, analyzing and testing products to recommend the best picks for most consumers. BestReviews and its newspaper partners may earn a commission if you purchase a product through one of our links.

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.