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Kid-Friendly Outdoor Activities if You Don't Have a Yard

Kid-Friendly Outdoor Activities if You Don't Have a Yard

Some cures for their boredom

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Though backyards are nice, they aren’t required for a good time. All your kids need is the wide open outdoors, an imagination and a few fun ideas to make the most out of summer during the coronavirus.

Scavenger hunts in the courtyard

 Scavenger hunts in the courtyard

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With parents spending more time at home with their children, they can put together a courtyard scavenger hunt if a building has one, or bring a list along on a walk. Go outside and jot down 10 or so things that the kids can look for. Scavenger hunt items can include a kind of leaf, a spiderweb, a bug, a funky shaped rock or even a hidden toy.

Scavenger hunts to find bugs

Scavenger hunts to find bugs

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You can do many different variations of scavenger hunts, and if your kid likes creepy crawly things, design one focused on bugs. You can find free printable bug scavenger hunt templates with columns for butterflies, lady bugs, worms and more. Kids can walk around searching for the bugs on the sheet and check them off as they go.

Tree and flowers hunt

Tree and flowers hunt

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Similar to finding specific bugs, kids can also dabble in botany and look for the many kinds of trees, plants and flowers growing in the neighborhood. They may even be inspired to start an easy indoor garden.

Chalk art

Chalk art

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If you have cement outside your apartment or living space, chalk art never gets old. Kids can draw anything from hopscotch games to unicorns to thank you notes for essential workers who might walk by.

Do it yourself walking tours

Do it yourself walking tours

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Walks are wonderful — especially after many people spent a lot of time indoors. To change up the usual (especially if you live in the city), you can do a little research and take the kids on a walking tour of amazing architecture, beautiful bridges and fun facts around your hometown.

Tea party

Tea party

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To make a regular tea party even more fun, take the teacups and fancy hats outside to your balcony or courtyard if there is one accessible to you. You can lay out a cute spread, bring out some cookies, pour fruit juice in plastic play tea cups (or real ones if you’re feeling ambitious) and have your “guests” wear something fancy. Or even celebrate your kid’s birthday while social distancing by bringing the supplies to a nearby park.

Bike riding

Bike riding

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Whether the kids’ bikes are inside the house or in a storage space, take them bike riding every now and then when the weather is warm. It’s a fun way to get in some exercise.

Gardening

Gardening

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If your community has a garden or a stretch of greenery that could use some flowers, ask the town if you could plant some. It could slowly but surely become a cute community botanical garden for others to plant their favorite flowers.

Kite flying

Kite flying

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Flying kites is a quintessential summer activity. And if it’s windy out, even better. You might even find a DIY kit that you can order to make your own kites.

Bubbles

Bubbles

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If you still have worries about going to the park in the wake of coronavirus, kids can spend a couple hours just basking in the sun out on the patio or a common building area outside blowing bubbles to see how far they go.

Planting potted flowers and veggies

Planting potted flowers and veggies

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If you have some seeds to plant in the house or a community garden, get your kids involved. You can also give them their own small pots and a few seeds to plant their own flowers or vegetables. Gardening can be just as therapeutic for kids as it is for adults, and it could be something they look after and take pride in.

Birdwatching

Birdwatching

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A simple and relaxing activity no matter where you live is birdwatching. Kids can spend the afternoon waiting for common birds in front of the house or in the park like sparrows, robins, doves and, if they’re lucky, a bright blue jay or a yellow goldfinch. After birdwatching, they can do some internet research to learn about the birds they just spotted.

I Spy

I Spy

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“I spy with my little eye… an earthworm!” I Spy is a fantastic way to pass the time both indoors and outdoors and a great way for kids to notice things they hadn’t before while at the park or on a walk through the neighborhood.

Cloud watching

Cloud watching

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Watching clouds go by requires nothing more than a sheet to spread on the ground of a shared space or a park and a bright summer day. And it’s the perfect place for kids to put that imagination to use. Something as serene as cloud watching can also put even the most anxious of adults and children at ease.

Walking trails

 Walking trails

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Many living communities have walking paths around the neighborhood. If yours has one, get in those steps while you take a stroll with the kids.

Water balloon catch

Water balloon catch

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Whether you have a backyard or not, toss around a filled water balloon in an open field and see who drops or pops one first. Have a whole bucket of these ready because they will go fast, and remember to pick up your balloon parts when you're done. 

Grilling outdoors

Grilling outdoors

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Head to a park that allows grilling or your balcony if you have one, bust out the grill and throw a barbeque that your kids can get involved with. While the adults man the grill, set up a condiment station so the kids can build their own burgers or top their own grilled steaks, pizza or chicken.

 

Painting

Painting

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Painting outside, whether that’s on the porch or in the wide open fields, is not only more inspiring, but it also eliminates any of the mess inside the house. If you don’t have canvas or large sheets of paper, you can repurpose cereal boxes by cutting them out and painting on the reverse sides.

Painting rocks

Painting rocks

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And to get more creative, kids can collect rocks and paint them with small pictures or any symbols they enjoy drawing. Once the rocks dry, you can use them as decoration inside your home. On your next family walk, drop them along your path for something fun for your community to find.

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