Hurdle stretch from Stretches You Should Never Do Before a Workout

Stretches You Should Never Do Before a Workout

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Hurdle stretch

Hurdle stretches were very popular, but coaches don’t “prescribe” them anymore because of the high injury risk. Knee pain is common after you’ve been holding the one leg in front and one leg bent position for a minute or so. The bent leg puts a lot of pressure on the knee as it’s forced to be sideways, which is not natural. The knee joint’s only job is to flex and extend.

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Pike stretch

Pike stretch, which primarily work your glutes, hamstrings, and calves, is another example of static stretching because you’re really not moving. Standing or sitting with your legs straight, bend at the waist and touch your toes. Keep the knees together. Exhale as you stretch forward, but move slowly. Hold your ankles. Don’t go beyond your comfort zone. It’s not supposed to hurt.

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Knees to chest stretches

Whether you pull one or both legs to your chest while lying on the floor, you’re risking injury to both your neck and your back. Knees to chest stretches can also result in too much pressure on your lower back, increasing the risk of damage or irritation.

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Lying hamstring stretch

This is another stretching exercise that puts unnecessary pressure on the spine and stress on the back, which may lead to pain. If you need to stretch the hamstrings, do a deadlift instead.

The hamstrings are in the "postural muscles" category. They are used to hold your upright posture. These types of muscles tend to shorten over time unless stretched or often taken through their full range of motion. The hamstrings’ strong connective tissue fibers are another reason why stretching the muscles is difficult.

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Sit and reach stretch

The problem with this stretch is the sitting. The nerves that go into the calves from behind the knee are stretched more than the hamstrings. It’s ok to do the sit and reach test to determine your flexibility level, but avoid it before a workout. Hamstring and lower back stretches are the best ways to improve your score.

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Calf stretch

Wall-supported calf stretches are another example of stretching only one muscle group. Place your palms on a wall with one leg bent in front of you and your foot flat on the ground, while the trailing leg is straight and stretched away from the wall. Do that to cool down after a training session, not before.

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Posterior deltoid stretch

This muscle doesn’t really get tight or overworked, so there is no real need for this stretch, which “shortens already too-short muscles in your chest and lengthens muscles in your back that are already overstretched,” according to exercise physiologist and licensed massage practitioner Nikki Naab-Levy.

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Hip abductor stretch

Don’t neglect your hip abductors, but stretch the muscles after you’ve warmed up. While lying on the ground, straighten both legs. Bring the right leg across your body, twist your torso to the left, and let the leg rest on top of your left leg.

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Kneeling hip flexor stretch

You will do the kneeling hip flexor stretch after exercising when your muscles are warm. That’s how you loosen a tight hip flexor. If you stretch before warming up, you may end up moving wrong because the muscles are too tight, which restricts your range of motion. The result is an arched back and raised leg (which means you’re not really stretching).

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Butterfly stretch

The butterfly stretch is great for flexibility, which is why you should do it after exercising. It engages your thighs. Sitting on the ground, place the bottoms of your feet together, let your knees fall as low as they comfortably can and, keeping your back straight, lean forward and bringing your chest towards your feet. This common warmup stretches the groin, inner thighs, hips, and lower back.

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Quad stretch

Many people do quad stretches before they start the serious part of their training program, which is a bad move because quads stretches are just another form of static stretching. You are not sitting, but you’re not moving either. You are more than welcome to stretch the quads after. Tip: Squeeze the glute muscles to increase the intensity.

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Lunge Stretch

Walking lunges are dynamic movements so, by all means, do them before you start exercising. But don’t confuse them with static lunges when your feet are in the same position during the exercise. You are standing in a split-stance, engaging the abs. You maintain this position as you bend your legs to lower your hips toward the floor.

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Seated twist stretches

Twists combine spinal flexion and rotation, and are unsafe for the lower back. “The disks of the spine don’t like to be twisted,” Dr. Julie Barnett, physical therapist, who plays tennis and golf, bikes, skis and hikes, says. “It can be dangerous for the back.” 

Stretches You Should Never Do Before a Workout