The Most Allergy Friendly Pets from The Most Allergy Friendly Pets

The Most Allergy Friendly Pets

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The Most Allergy Friendly Pets

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As many as three in 10 people in the U.S. experience allergic reactions to cats and dogs, and cat allergies are about twice as common as dog allergies, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA). Animal lovers who happen to have allergies can look for hypoallergenic pets. Hypo means less, not none. In fact, studies have suggested that hypoallergenic dogs can cause as many symptoms as other dogs. People have reported tolerating pets that don’t shed much, require less grooming, or have shorter hair because they may pick up other allergens such as pollen. What causes that an allergic reaction is not necessarily the hair – it’s the saliva proteins that stay on the coat during grooming.

Bedlington Terrier

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This breed is considered good for allergy sufferers, according to the American Kennel Club (AKC). They tend to shed less because of their curly hair and require little in the way of grooming. The Bedlington Terrier is categorized as a low dander breed.

Chinese Crested

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Cresteds shed little to no hair and are recommended for those with allergies, AKC says, which can reduce allergens in the home. Some Chinese crested dogs are hairless, with hair only on the head, tail and feet. Powderpuff cresteds have a soft coat over their whole body.

Labradoodle

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Not all labradoodles are allergy friendly or hypoallergenic, some are more than others. If a family member has dog allergies,  you want at least a second generation Labradoodle or an Australian Labradoodle, either with a fleece or wool coat, according to the Labradoodle Breeder. With a diet rich in Omega-3 acid, allergens can be reduced as this will help keep the skin hydrated and decrease dander.

Poodle

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In addition to being one the most intelligent dog breeds, poodles are also recommended for people who suffer from pet allergies. This is because poodles have tightly curled coats with no undercoat, preventing dead hair from falling out and floating in the air. Dander is also retained. Plus, smaller dogs tend to shed less.

Portuguese Water Dog

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Portuguese Water Dogs are considered to be hypoallergenic because they are single-coated, according to the Portuguese Water Dog Club of America.  This kind of breed still produces allergens, but because of their coat type, they will typically produce less than others. People with severe allergies and asthma will likely still be affected. The Obamas have a Portuguese Water Dog because Malia is allergic.

Sphynx

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While not hypoallergenic because they have excess body oil to which many people are allergic when it comes to cats, the Sphynx is recommended by some because these cats don’t have allergen-laden hair. Some allergenic people found that the Sphinx is perfect for them, according to PetMD. Still, a person with severe allergies should be tested for an allergy to the cat oil before getting a sphynx.

Kerry Blue Terrier

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The Kerry is a breed with a non-shedding coat, which is why it is one of the most commonly recommended breeds for people with allergies, according to the Kerry Blue Terrier Foundation. The Kerry sheds its skin about every 21 days—far less often than most other breeds. “When a dog's coat does not shed, less allergen are released in the air, provided that the coat is kept clean and clipped.”

Devon Rex

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The Devon rex cat sheds very little fur. They have less hair and so they don’t need to be cleaned as often as other breeds. The cat will need to have his or her paw pads and ears cleaned of oil build-up frequently, but doesn't need frequent full baths, according to Catster.

Bichon Frise

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Like poodles, the Bichon frise is a lower-allergen dog. Due to their curled coat, dander stays trapped. These dogs are usually groomed often, which also means that less dander is being released into the air. While allergy sufferers may tolerate this small pet, the Bichon frise can develop a lot of allergies. No matter how well-bred it may be, according to Pets 4 Homes, especially to foods and fleas.

Bergamasco

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The Bergamasco coat – those long and thick matted locks– is considered hair, not fur and is considered non-allergic, according to Dog Breed Info Center. Even during the shedding process, only a few hairs will actually fall. The locks keep the dander trapped.

Balinese

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This is a hypoallergenic cat, similar to Siamese but with shorter fur. They produce much less Fel d 1, the protein in their saliva and a major cat allergen, than most other cats, according to Siamese Roaylty. This means that when they lick themselves to clean up, they don’t release as many irritants. These cats also produce less dander.

Afghan Hound

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The hair of the Afghan Hound does not shed and is the same pH as human hair creating no dander, according to Dog Listener. As a single-coated breed, this dog also produces fewer allergens. Afghan Hounds are on AKC’s list of hypoallergenic dog breeds.

Javanese

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The Javanese is a popular cat among people with allergies. They have a single coat of fur and no underneath hairs, which means less hair and less allergens in the air, according to Wild About Pets. “Like the Balinese, the Javanese sports a medium-long single coat that doesn’t mat. Because of the lack of undercoat, they have less fur, which translates into fewer allergens,” according to Pet Finder.

Cornish Rex

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It is believed that Cornish Rex coats don’t hold as much saliva as other cat breeds. Less hair in the air means less saliva and dander allergens. These cats have soft, wavy coats without guard hairs. This means they don’t shed much. They also need little grooming.

Siberian

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Like the Balinese, the Siberian has a moderately long coat, but still is hypoallergenic due to the lower-than-average enzyme levels in their saliva, according to Catster. Some claim that 75 percent of cat allergy sufferers have no reaction to the Siberian. It produces less of the Fel d 1 protein to which people are allergic.