25 of the Easiest Health Resolutions a Person Can Make and Keep from 25 of the Easiest Health Resolutions a Person Can Make and Keep

25 of the Easiest Health Resolutions a Person Can Make and Keep

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25 of the Easiest Health Resolutions a Person Can Make and Keep

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If you’re one of the many people who makes resolutions that don’t stick, you may want to consider easier resolutions and doable goals. The most common resolutions pertain to weight loss but maybe you can set more unique goals this year, pushing yourself to live a longer, healthier, and happier life.

Plan Meals Ahead

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“Even if it’s just one meal this week, you’ll feel more confident about coming home to knowing what’s for dinner,” says Tara Linitz, nutrition manager at EatLove. Check out EatLove’s blog post about starting the new year off with just one planned dinner a week.

Don't Just Join a Gym – Have a Plan!

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“Don't just go to the closest gym and sign up without a plan or knowing if this is going to be the gym for you,” says Michelle Roots, owner and personal trainer at CORE Conditioning. “Try a few different gyms or group fitness classes to find one you truly enjoy, which will help you stick to it long term.”

Meatless Monday

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Plant-based diets are well documented for long term health benefits, but it’s not always easy to make the switch,” Linitz says. “Start small with meatless Mondays.” Check out some vegetarian-friendly meal plans here.

Up Your Snack Game

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“It’s easy to just grab a handful of pretzels or chips, but make sure you pair any carb with a protein so the snack fills you up,” Linitz explains. “Think fruit + nuts, whole grain crackers + string cheese, and bell peppers + hummus.”

Make Exercise and Eating Healthy a Priority

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“Make a commitment to make eating healthier and adding exercise to your daily routine a priority,” Roots explains. “If you have time to watch TV, go on social media, or meet friends for dinner; then you have time to prepare healthier snacks and meals and get in at least 15 minutes of physical activity each day.”

Eat Out Less

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“If you are someone who eats out for lunch or dinner every day, try to decrease this to 2-3 times per week and prepare healthy meals from home for the other days,” Roots says.

Learn to Cook Healthier

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Healthy nutrition and a balanced diet are important for maintaining all you body’s functions. “If you don't know how to or don't enjoy cooking, make a commitment to try out one new healthy recipe each week,” Roots says.

Clear All the Junk Food From the House

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“If the cupboards are bursting at the seams with processed junk food, throw it all away,” Roots says. “Refill with healthier alternatives.” Fiber-filled superfoods and healthy, high-fat foods should always be in your kitchen.

Get More Sleep

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“If you are currently going to bed late and feel you are tired every morning, set a bed time for yourself and get into the habit of unplugging and going to sleep an hour earlier each night,” Roots says.

Eat a Fruit or a Vegetable With Every Meal or Snack

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“Make a conscious effort to have fruits and chopped vegetables ready to go in the fridge,” Roots says. This will “make it easy to add them to meals and snacks throughout the day,” she adds. Looking for other ways to up your veggie intake? EatLove helps you quantify how many veggie servings you eat per meal, Linitz says. Experts recommend five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables daily.

Eat One Meal Mindfully This Week

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“It takes our brain 20 minutes to realize our body is full,” Linitz says. “We’re often eating on the run, but choose one meal this week to truly enjoy your food, savor each bite, and chew slowly.”

Drink More Water

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“Buy yourself a great water bottle you like and carry it with you everywhere,” Roots says. “A great tip is to wrap rubber bands around the bottle (the number of bands should = the number of bottles you should drink each day) and each time you refill the bottle, remove a rubber band to keep track.”

Switch Up Your Morning Routine

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“If you are in the habit of stopping at your local coffee shop on the way to work each morning, you will save both money and calories by making breakfast and coffee at home,” Roots says.

Eat Breakfast

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“If you never eat breakfast, start small and just aim for 2-3 times per week. Aim for a balanced breakfast with both fiber-rich carb and lean-protein,” Linitz says. Some examples include oatmeal with nuts and milk; eggs with whole grain toast and a piece of fruit; or a smoothie with real fruit, veggies, and plain Greek yogurt, she adds.

Add a Pop of Color to Your Breakfast

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“No more boring toast + butter or plain cereal; let’s jazz it up with smashed avocado on toast, or berries on oatmeal or a bright colored smoothie,” Linitz says.

Learn to Love Your Body and Stop Body Bashing

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“There is too much body bashing going on in the world these days, this year make a commitment to work hard to become a better YOU,” Roots says. “Do not compare yourself to others, embrace your body and learn to love it.”

Take the Stairs Instead of the Elevator At Least Once Per Day

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“This is one of the best ways to sneak in some extra physical activity each day,” Roots says. See: 10 Tips: How to Get Moving at Work

Limit Mid-Day or Late-Night Snacking

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“If you aren't hungry don't eat,” Roots says. “Try to do something to distract yourself and get away from the habit of snacking when you aren't truly hungry.”

Go to the Grocery Store With a List

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Make a list before you go to the store to use as a reference. EatLove gives you an automated grocery list based on your recipe selections. It’s organized by each aisle, so you can seamlessly shop in and out without stress,” Linitz says.

Replace Sugar With Natural Sweeteners Like Agave, Honey, or Stevia

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“Try to limit the amount of white sugar you consume,” Roots says. “Start to read nutrition labels of the foods you eat and use natural sweeteners when possible.”

Carry a Water Bottle

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Linitz says that she often hears people resolve to “drink more water.” “Yet oftentimes, we’re ill equipped. Having a reusable water bottle on hand ensures you’re well-prepared,” she adds.

Walk 10 Minutes a Day

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“Do this on your commute, lunch break, or right when you wake up in the morning,” Linitz says. Walking just 10 minutes a day will boost your metabolism, help with digestion, strengthen your heart, and put you in a better mood.

Order Dressing or Toppings on the Side

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“This time of year, many of us opt for ordering salads out, but watch the dressing, cheese, and dried fruit, which may come buried, hiding hundreds of calories,” Linitz says. “Recommended portion sizes would be about 1-2 tbsp. of nuts/seeds/dried fruit, 1 ounce of cheese, and 2 tbsp. of salad dressing.”

Read More Books

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The benefits of reading actual books are endless. Research shows that it reduces stress levels by 68 percent. Research also suggests that it improves brain function by causing changes in resting-state connectivity of the brain that persist. Reading has also been proven to boost brain power and increase intelligence. Another very important benefit is that it may help fight Alzheimer’s disease.

Limit Liquid Calories

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“Juice, soda, sweetened iced teas, lemonades, energy drinks, and alcohol — they add up quick, often providing ‘empty calories,’ and studies show liquid calories don’t fill us up as much as eating our calories (think eating an apple vs. quickly downing a glass of juice),” Linitz says. “Sub in water (you can infuse with fruit, basil, or mint for a boost of added flavor), unsweetened tea, and black coffee.”