11 Suncare and Sunscreen Secrets Every Women Should Know from 11 Suncare and Sunscreen Secrets Every Women Should Know

11 Suncare and Sunscreen Secrets Every Women Should Know

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11 Suncare and Sunscreen Secrets Every Women Should Know

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Just when you thought you knew everything about protecting your skin from the sun, new secrets have been uncovered.

Sunscreen has proven to be the best shields to protect skin against wrinkles and loss of elasticity which is caused by the sun, a process known as photoaging. Over time, it causes skin blemishes like liver spots and freckles.

That being said, the SPF number on your sunscreen is vital to the safety of your skin. “Look for an SPF of 30 or higher,” According to UW Health. ”There's little evidence to suggest an SPF of 50 or greater offers better protection.”

Continue reading for suncare and sunscreen secrets.

Sunscreen is harming the environment

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Sunscreen may be protecting you from harmful UV rays, but the truth is that it is actually harming our environment. According to NPR, a 2015 study explains that the chemicals in sunscreen are harming coral reefs. “The ingredient oxybenzone leaches the coral of its nutrients and bleaches it white. It can also disrupt the development of fish and other wildlife.”

Sunscreens are not completely waterproof

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Just because it says its waterproof or water-resistant does not mean it actually is. Sunscreen retains their stated SPF value for either 40 or 80 minutes while sweating or in the water, according to research.

Sunscreen expires

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Before applying your sunscreen from last year, make sure you check the expiration date. Although studies have shown that sunscreen is effective for at least three years, it is still advised to discontinue use after the expiration date or check the consistency and color of your sunscreen for signs it is expired.

Makeup with SPF is not enough

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Many foundations offer SPF protection. But the truth is that your makeup is not providing enough coverage from the sun. It is advised to wear SPF 30 under your makeup to ensure safety from UV rays.

The sun dries out your hair

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Wondering why your hair seems brittle and dry in the summertime? If you are overexposing yourself to the sun, using products that contain alcohol or frequently swimming, it is likely your hair will become dehydrated, ultimately resulting in damage.

If it’s under SPF 15, it’s useless

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There is no point in applying sunscreen that is less than SPF 15. In fact, doctors have warned that using SPF 15 sunscreen may still not prevent sunburn or the risk of skin cancer. Opt for SPF 30 instead.

Clothing is the best sun blocker

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Protecting yourself from the sun’s rays can be exhausting – constantly reapplying and spending loads of money on sunscreen can be a hassle. Instead, wear sun protection clothing or any type of clothing that blocks your skin. It offers an extra layer of protection against the sun.

Take a cold shower

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Have you noticed that the summer heat is giving you acne? The solution – take a cold shower. Research has shown that cold showers can help reduce the appearance of acne and they add more shine to your hair too.

Put on sunscreen before you put on your clothes

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It sounds like common sense, but many people apply sunscreen after they have put their clothes on, therefore forgetting to apply it under the areas in which they are wearing clothes. Putting on your sunscreen before you get dressed makes it less likely to miss a spot.

You can still get sunburned on cloudy days

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Just because the clouds are blocking the sunlight does not mean its blocking all of the sun’s harmful UV rays. Research has shown that different clouds block more UV rays than others. For instance, watch out for fluffy, white clouds, as they allow approximately 89% of rays through.

You’re probably not using enough

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You need to apply sunscreen liberally. If you’re sweating or swimming, you may need to apply it more frequently. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, “during a long day at the beach, one person should use around one half to one quarter of an 8 oz. bottle. Sunscreens should be applied 30 minutes before sun exposure to allow the ingredients to fully bind to the skin.” You should also reapply it every two hours.