11 Non-Running Workouts You've Probably Never Tried from 11 Non-Running Workouts You've Probably Never Tried

11 Non-Running Workouts You've Probably Never Tried

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11 Non-Running Workouts You've Probably Never Tried

We get it: running just isn’t your jam. Either you’ve tried your hand at it a few times and just can’t find that “high” everyone seems to be gloating about. Or, you just don’t see any appeal in it all.

The good news is, you don’t need any reason not to run. If you don’t like it, you don’t like it, and that’s totally fine. However, as you’re probably aware, you do need some sort of physical activity in your life (preferably a kind that you enjoy) if you want to stay healthy and strong. But if traditional activities like running, swimming, cycling or weight lifting don’t really excite or interest you, then maybe you’ve found it challenging to find an exercise routine you can really stick with.

That’s OK, though. Because there are so many different ways to stay active — the list is nearly endless. And to help you narrow your search for an actually enjoyable activity, here we’ve highlighted 11 of our favorite non-running workouts that we bet you’ve probably never tried, but that are definitely worth taking a shot at. 

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Powerlifting

To be clear, powerlifting — which, formally, involves lifting a maximum amount of weight in three attempts — is a pretty intense sport and it’s definitely not meant for beginners. But if you’re bored by traditional weight lifting and interested in getting strong, it’s definitely something you might be interested in working towards. First you’ll have to build a solid strength training base, but once you’ve got a strong foundation you can move towards challenging yourself with heavier, squat, deadlift and bench press lifts.

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Ballroom Dancing

At first, it might not seem like much of a workout, but give it a go and you’ll soon learn that ballroom dancing is not even close to being low-key. “Dance is a weight-bearing activity, which builds bones. It's also wonderful for your upper body and strength,” Catherine Cram, M.S., an exercise physiologist at Comprehensive Fitness Consulting in Middleton, Wis. told WebMD. Plus, different dance styles target different muscles, meaning you’ll have the advantage of building strength all over.  

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Trampoline Training

Channel your inner child by working up a sweat on a trampoline. Whether you choose to hop around in your own backyard or head to one of the many fitness-focused trampoline studios that are popping up all around the country, we guarantee you’ll have fun while also getting in a great cardio and strength workout. In fact, bouncing around is so beneficial that Slopestlye Silver Medalist Devin Logan actually incorporates trampoline training in her regimen to in order to stay in Olympic-level shape.

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Anti-Gravity Yoga

Even if traditional yoga isn’t your cup of tea, we bet you’ll find excitement in this more playful version of the practice. Anti-gravity, or aerial yoga incorporates a floating hammock, which allows for greater spinal decompression, enhanced weight resistance and deeper stretching. The atmosphere and feel of an anti-gravity class is similar to a typical yoga session, only traditional poses are modified in order to work with the hammock.

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Rock Climbing

Rock climbing engages nearly every muscle in your body, so if you’re on the hunt for an activity that doesn’t necessarily feel like exercise, but that builds strength, stamina and agility, then this challenging sport may just meet all of your criteria. Search for a nearby indoor wall and sign up for a few beginner sessions to find out whether or not it’ll keep you hooked. 

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Rowing

In 2014, spinning suddenly became old news and rowing quickly made its debut as the all-the-rage workout trend of the year. Maybe fitness buffs have moved on to the next latest and greatest trend, but rowing still remains an excellent and exciting way to work out. “85 percent of your body is activated while rowing,” says Shaun Jenkins, an instructor at the CityRow rowing studio in New York City. “It's a total body experience.” Still not convinced? Here are four more reasons it should certainly be a part of your workout routine

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Tai Chi

Dianne Bailey, a certified strength and conditioning specialist and owner of The Conditioning Classroom in Colorado, especially recommends Tai Chi for those who are just beginning a new exercise routine. “It is a gentle, meditative form of exercise,”she said. “Many studies have proven its benefits such as stress-relief, lowering blood pressure, improving mental focus and improving balance.” If you’re looking for a gentler activity, but something that still provides a challenge then Tai Chi is definitely ideal. “So many exercise facilities focus on ‘extreme’ exercise,” Bailey added.  “Most people are not ready for extreme. Tai Chi is a great place to begin.” 

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Boxing

Speaking of the latest and greatest fitness trends, boxing is definitely having a moment right now. According to New York City wellness website, Well + Good, “fashion models just can’t get enough of boxing,” and even Beyoncé and First Lady Michelle Obama have demonstrated a love for the sport. “Boxing is a great full-body workout, and is one of the more enjoyable forms of cardio,” says Lee Pickering, a trainer with DW Fitness Clubs. “It involves quick footwork and releases a lot of pent-up stress.” Essentially, it’s a total-body strength workout and cardio combo, which means you can get a pretty killer workout in a short amount of time.

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Barre

Yes, barre workouts are ballet-based, but don’t worry if you’re not the dancing type — you won’t be required to perform and fancy footwork. Instead, you can actually expect to work your entire body, as most classes involve mat-based exercises like planks and push-ups in addition to the lower-body portion that focuses on squat- and lunge-type moves performed with the assistance of a mirror-mounted ballet-type bar. 

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Step Aerobics

These days, many dismiss this high-energy aerobic workout as an over-hyped fad from the 80s, but an hour on the step can burn anywhere from 360 (moderate) to 550 (vigorous) calories. Plus, based on our own experience, we can almost guarantee that you’ll have a blast — most step routines are set to high-energy soundtracks and incorporate unique moves that will make you feel more like you’re at a dance party rather than the gym. 

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Sandbag Training

Working with a sandbag (literally a canvas bag filled with sand) will challenge your strength, stability, balance and mobility while also stressing your neuromuscular system and working your muscles in all planes of motion, says ACE fitness pro and educator Elizabeth Andrews. Plus, her six-exercise routine was designed to take just 30 minutes and is a great option for anyone who’s looking to switch up their resistance routine with a new style of training

11 Non-Running Workouts You've Probably Never Tried