The Flower Symbolism Behind Common Wedding Bouquets

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The Flower Symbolism Behind Common Wedding Bouquets

The Flower Symbolism Behind Common Wedding Bouquets

Make sure your floral arrangements say ‘I do’
The Flower Symbolism Behind Common Wedding Bouquets

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A big part of wedding planning — and the wedding budget — is figuring out the floral arrangements of your ceremony, reception and the bouquet. Beyond looking beautiful, flowers can have quite a bit of meaning, so make sure to say the right thing by picking one of these popular options.

Calla lily

Calla lily

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Calla lilies are native to South Africa, a place with many mesmerizingly beautiful spots, so it makes sense that calla lilies signify beauty.

Magnolia

Magnolia

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Magnolias are the official state flower of both Louisiana and Mississippi, the latter of which has the unofficial state nickname of “The Magnolia State.” They connote a love of nature and nobility.

Peony

Peony

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If you’re hoping for a boost in happiness in your life and marriage, it is said that peonies symbolize happiness in both of those things as well as bashfulness.

Forget-me-not

Forget-me-not

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Per their name, forget-me-nots say “do not forget me” and represent memories of true love. Despite also being an edible flower with a powerful meaning, they are not one of the foods that can fight memory loss.

Sage

Sage

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Typically associated with purification rituals or as a flavoring in pork and turkey recipes, sage is a perennial plant that can also be an aesthetically pleasing addition to a bouquet. It symbolizes wisdom and immortality.

Violet

Violet

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Violets are the perfect flowers to signify a relationship, as they’re a symbol of loyalty, faithfulness and devotion. They also symbolize modesty and, believe it or not, are one of the flowers you didn’t know you can eat.

Daffodil

Daffodil

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One of the best plants for rookie gardeners, daffodils symbolize regard and unequaled love, both sentiments you will want to express to your beloved.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea

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Hydrangeas are actually shrubs of flowers, and they symbolize gratitude for being understood.

Camellia

Camellia

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Camellias have slight variations in their meaning depending on their color. Pink camellias say “I’m longing for you,” red camellias say “You’re a flame in my heart,” and white camellias are a simple “You’re adorable.”

Orchid

Orchid

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Orchids symbolize love, beauty and refinement. They’re also a Chinese symbol for many children, so add them to your bouquet if you’re hoping to be blessed with the life-changing experience of becoming a parent.

Daisy

Daisy

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Daisies are as cute in meaning as they are in appearance. They are symbols of innocence, purity, hope and a loyal love like the love of a long-lasting marriage.

Gardenia

Gardenia

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Gardenias symbolize secret love, a great representation of the intimacy between partners.

Carnation

Carnation

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Generally symbolizing women and love, different color carnations mean different things. A red carnation signifies that your heart aches with admiration, while pink carnations say “I’ll never forget you.” White carnations are a symbol of innocence, pure love and good luck, while striped carnations mean refusal and yellow ones connote disappointment or rejection.

Mint

Mint

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While mint is an ingredient in some of our favorite desserts, you may also want to throw some sprigs into a bouquet. They signify virtue, which isn’t a bad characteristic to represent yourself with when walking down the aisle.

Rose

Rose

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The red rose is a symbol of love throughout the world, but there are many varieties to choose from for a wedding bouquet. Pink roses signify happiness, while white roses symbolize purity and say “I’m worthy of you.” Consider avoiding yellow roses, as they can symbolize toxic relationship habits such as jealousy and infidelity.

Stephanotis

Stephanotis

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The small and white, five-petaled stephanotis flower connotes happiness in marriage, as well as a desire to travel, perfect for the couple ready to take on a life filled with romantic adventures together.

Hyacinth

Hyacinth

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The meaning of a hyacinth can vary with color. Blue hyacinths suggest constancy, while white hyacinths symbolize loveliness and prayers for someone, all of which are wonderful sentiments to bring into a marriage. Red or pink hyacinths are good options too, as they symbolize play, but a purple hyacinth means sorrow and yellow hyacinths can signify jealousy, which — as a toxic relationship sign — is best avoided.

Sunflower

Sunflower

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As wonderfully picturesque as they are, sunflowers symbolize haughtiness. For a sunny, bright bouquet, get some dwarf sunflowers, which symbolize adoration.

Bluebell

Bluebell

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The descriptively named bluebell flower symbolizes humility and constancy, both of which are important qualities of a kind person.

Lily

Lily

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White lilies are a famous symbol for purity, but they can also signify majesty or, more romantically, mean “It’s heavenly to be with you.” Yellow lilies say “I’m walking on air,” while tiger lilies are a symbol of wealth and pride. The daylily is a Chinese symbol for mothers, perfect for a bride that’s a mother or to pin on a mother of the bride or groom.

Sweet pea

Sweet pea

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Pink, white, red, purple and violet sweet peas are perfect for weddings. The small and fragrant flowers symbolize blissful or delicate pleasures. They also mean “Thank you for a lovely time,” a kind phrase we all need to say more often.

Zinnia

Zinnia

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Zinnias come in a wide variety of colors and are particularly abundant in warm-weather Mexico. Magenta zinnias signify lasting affection, scarlet ones symbolize constancy, white zinnias connote goodness and yellow ones stand for daily remembrance. Zinnias also are used to remember an absent or deceased friend.

Rosemary

Rosemary

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An evergreen shrub, rosemary has a pleasant, subtle scent that can spruce up any bouquet visually and olfactorily. Symbolizing remembrance, it’s also a subtle way to honor those loved ones no longer with you on your big day.

Tulip

Tulip

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A sure sign of spring in America and throughout the world, tulips are the most popular garden flower, generally symbolizing the perfect lover. A red tulip is a declaration of love and symbolizes passion, while yellow tulips say “There’s sunshine in your smile.”

Jasmine

Jasmine

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Fragrant jasmine can be a lovely addition to your bouquet, and the more common white jasmine represents sweet love and amiability. Yellow jasmine symbolizes grace and elegance, attributes most would want to embody with proper etiquette on their wedding day.

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