Courtesy of Craig Sjodin/ABC

Inclusive Family TV Shows to Watch

Inclusive Family TV Shows to Watch

Family TV for all viewers

Courtesy of Craig Sjodin/ABC

Whether you have young children or a home full of teenagers, finding time to connect and enjoy family activities is essential. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, gathering as a family to watch television can be an educational moment that brings everyone together. Co-viewing gives both children and parents the opportunity to learn about each other’s interests, discuss family values and share experiences.

There are plenty of wonderful shows on Netflix, Hulu or other streaming platforms or TV channels, but not all of them are age-appropriate for everyone or have an inclusive cast that reflects the complexities of life and varieties of experiences that people have. If you’re looking for shows that explore complicated themes and feature diverse casts, here are some of the best diverse family-friendly TV shows you can watch.

‘Kim’s Convenience’

‘Kim’s Convenience’

Courtesy of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

“Kim’s Convenience” is a feel-good television sitcom that interweaves important life lessons with well-timed jokes. Set in Toronto, the show follows members of a Korean-Canadian family as they deal with customers at their store and navigate what it means to be a family. “Kim’s Convenience” premiered on the CBC TV network but is available to stream with a Netflix subscription.

‘The Loud House’

‘The Loud House’

Courtesy of Nickelodeon

Anyone who has been spending more time at home with their children knows how chaotic things can be when you have everyone running around at once. Well, Nickelodeon’s “Loud House” takes that scenario and animates it, ultimately showing that life is better when you have family to count on. Lincoln Loud has five older sisters, five younger sisters and one bathroom. Although life can sometimes get out of hand with surprise makeovers or overcrowded family road trips, Lincoln wouldn’t have it any other way.

‘One Day at a Time’

‘One Day at a Time’

Courtesy of Ali Goldstein/Netflix

‘One Day at a Time’ is a heartwarming show that touches on the importance of building a bond with your children and cultivating healthy relationships. A spinoff of the ‘80s sitcom with the same name, “One Day at a Time” reimagines the classic TV show with a newly single Latina mother raising her daughter and son with the help of her traditional mother. The show, which deftly tackles subjects such as racism and mental illness, aired on Netflix for three seasons before it was canceled but was then picked up by Pop TV.

‘Steven Universe’

‘Steven Universe’

Jason Kempin/Getty Images for Cartoon Network

Embarking on fantastical adventures in real life might not be an option for a while, but you can still get lost in the stellar world of “Steven Universe.” “Steven Universe” is an animated show that follows a boy named Steven as he tackles magical adventures and learns important life lessons to save the day. “Steven Universe” aired on Cartoon Network, but if you want to get caught up, the first four seasons are on Hulu.

‘On My Block’

‘On My Block’

Courtesy of Kevin Estrada/Netflix

Creepy gnomes, urban legends and witty dialogue are only some of the things that make “On My Block” so great. The show follows four high schoolers attempting to navigate love, family and friendship in Freeridge, a fictional inner-city neighborhood in Los Angeles. Three seasons of “On My Block” are available on Netflix.

‘Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts’

‘Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts’

Courtesy of Netflix

If you’re an animal lover with a taste for the fantastical, “Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts” is the animated show you never knew you needed. “Kipo” follows a young girl as she makes her way in a world of mutant animals. With the help of her crew, Kipo discovers her powers and learns to survive in a new world.

‘Sister, Sister’

‘Sister, Sister’

Hulton Archive/Getty Images

If you think you and your siblings have it rough, try being twin sisters separated at birth who find one another by chance at a shopping mall. That’s the plot of “Sister, Sister,” a show about Tia and Tamera — twin sisters navigating boys, schools and sisterhood after 14 years of separation. Also hoping to get along are their polar-opposite adoptive parents, Ray Campbell and Lisa Landry. “Sister, Sister” is a throwback ‘90s show that was recently made available on Netflix. The 1990s sitcom is one of Netflix’s most-streamed shows.

‘The Proud Family’

‘The Proud Family’

Courtesy of Disney +

“The Proud Family” is an animated show that follows the life of a young Black girl named Penny Proud. Teen-dom is hard enough, but with loving, overprotective parents, mischievous siblings, sassy friend Dijonay and nemesis LaCienega Boulevardez on her heels, Penny always finds herself in hilarious larger-than-life scenarios. This Disney Channel show touches on everything from what life would be like without parents to discrimination. “The Proud Family” is available on Disney+.

‘Avatar: The Last Airbender’

‘Avatar: The Last Airbender’

Courtesy of Nickelodeon

After a 100-year hibernation, Avatar Aang must join with siblings Katara and Sokka to realize his true powers and defeat the Fire Nation. Although heartwarming at times, “Avatar: The Last Airbender” is an animated adventure show that teaches important lessons about love, sacrifice, friendship, power and so much more. The show originally aired on Nickelodeon, but all three “books,” or seasons, are available to stream on Netflix.

‘Mira, Royal Detective’

‘Mira, Royal Detective’

Courtesy of Disney Junior

“Mira, Royal Detective” is a new show on the scene — it premiered this year — but it has quickly become a family favorite. The Disney Junior show follows Mira, a brave young girl who is appointed to the role of “royal detective” by the queen of Jaipur. With the help of her friend Prince Neel, her cousin Priya and her mongoose friends Mikku and Chikku, Mira embarks on mystery-solving adventures.

‘Superstore’

‘Superstore’

Courtesy of Casey Durkin/NBC

“Superstore” is a feel-good workplace comedy that follows a group of employees who work for a Walmart-like store called Cloud 9. Together, both new and old employees must tackle the day-to-day struggle of riot-causing sales, disgruntled customers and more. “Superstore” isn’t afraid to touch on pay gaps, discrimination and other complex issues the American working class must face. Recently, the NBC show has explored what it’s like to work during a pandemic. “Superstore” is available to stream on Hulu.

‘The Expanding Universe of Ashley Garcia’

‘The Expanding Universe of Ashley Garcia’

Courtesy of Ali Goldstein/Netflix

“The Expanding Universe of Ashley Garcia” is a coming-of-age comedy about a 15-year-old scientist named Ashley. After moving across the country to pursue a career in robotics, she must navigate being a teenager in unknown territory. “Saved By the Bell” star Mario Lopez is one of the creators of the Netflix original show.

‘Atypical’

‘Atypical’

Courtesy of Tyler Golden/Netflix

“Atypical” chronicles the day-to-day life of Sam, a teen on the autism spectrum, after he decides he wants a girlfriend. As he strives for more freedom, his family must learn what it truly means to be supportive. “Atypical” is available to stream on Netflix, and now is the perfect time to get caught up — the final season is slated to premiere in 2021.

‘Diary of a Future President’

‘Diary of a Future President’

Courtesy of Disney +

If you ever had “become president of the United States” on your to-do list as a child, you’re certainly not alone. But for young Elena Cañero-Reed, it’s more than a dream — it’s a passion. “Diary of a Future President” follows Elena, a 12-year-old Cuban-American girl, through the chaos of middle school as she begins her journey of becoming the future president. As Elena documents the lows and highs of life in her trusty diary, she learns important lessons that lead her along her origin story as the nation’s next leader. “Diary of a Future President” is available to stream on Disney+.

‘Julie and the Phantoms’

‘Julie and the Phantoms’

Courtesy of KAILEY SCHWERMAN/NETFLIX

“Julie and the Phantoms” combines popular songs with ghostly ghouls for 30 minutes of rock-out-loud fun. After losing her mother, Julie’s love for music dwindles. But after playing one of her old CDs, three ghosts from the fictional ‘90s band Sunset Curve make an appearance. Together, Julie and her new phantom friends decide to start a band. “Julie and the Phantoms” was created by Emmy Award-winner Kenny Ortega, the mind behind the hit “High School Musical” films, and is available to stream on Netflix.

‘Never Have I Ever’

‘Never Have I Ever’

Courtesy of LARA SOLANKI/NETFLIX

“Never Have I Ever” follows Devi, an Indian-American teen who is determined to make her sophomore year of high school the year she becomes cool. The show was created by Emmy-nominated actress Mindy Kaling, known for her work on “The Office” and “The Mindy Project.” “Never Have I Ever” — which explores love, relationships, family and friendships — is best suited for teens and is available on Netflix.

‘Jane the Virgin’

‘Jane the Virgin’

JB Lacroix/Getty Images

Inspired by the stories of telenovelas, “Jane the Virgin” stars Emmy winner Gina Rodriguez as Jane Villanueva, a young woman who has vowed to remain chaste until marriage. After she’s accidentally artificially inseminated, Jane becomes pregnant and must rethink everything she’s ever believed. You’ll have to watch the dramedy yourself to believe the hijinks the characters find themselves in. You can catch all five seasons on Netflix.

‘Black-ish’

‘Black-ish’

Courtesy of ABC

ABC’s “Black-ish” is a 20-time Emmy-nominated comedy that follows the life of Andre “Dre” Johnson, his wife Rainbow, their five children and his traditional parents. With his family by his side, Dre learns important lessons about fatherhood and love, and teaches his children how to navigate the world as Black Americans. “Black-ish” has touched on everything from the presidential election and racial discrimination to postpartum depression. “Black-ish” is available to stream on Hulu.

‘Grown-ish’

‘Grown-ish’

Courtesy of Freeform

Right on the heels of “Black-ish” is Freeform’s “Grown-ish,” a spinoff of “Black-ish” that follows Dre’s daughter Zoey, played by Yara Shahidi, as she heads off to college. At college, Zoey quickly makes friends but realizes that life isn’t as easy as it seems. “Grown-ish” is available to stream on Hulu.

‘Everything’s Gonna Be Okay’

‘Everything’s Gonna Be Okay’

Courtesy of Eric Liebowitz/Freeform

After the untimely death of his father, twenty-something Nicholas has to take care of his American half-sisters, one of whom is on the autism spectrum. Absent for most of his younger siblings’ lives, Nicholas has no idea how to help his sisters cope with a devastating loss or raise teenagers, but he tries his best. The first season of “Everything’s Gonna Be Okay” is available on Hulu.

‘Moesha’

‘Moesha’

Matthew Rolston/UPN/Delivered by Online USA/Getty Images

Much like “Sister, Sister,” “Moesha” is another throwback ‘90s sitcom that recently gained attention after it was added to Netflix’s collection of shows. Moesha attempts to balance family, romance and building friendships while navigating high school. All six seasons of “Moesha” are available to stream on Netflix.

‘Black Lightning’

‘Black Lightning’

Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Superhero lovers will get a kick out of “Black Lightning.” The CW drama chronicles the life of school principal and retired superhero Jefferson Pierce after he jumps back into the superhero game as Black Lightning to protect his family. But it’s not just Pierce who rises to the call. “Black Lightning” is available to stream on Netflix.

‘Raising Dion’

‘Raising Dion’

Courtesy of Netflix

Superheroes can be any age, and “Raising Dion” proves it. This Netflix show follows a young boy named Dion as he learns how to control his emerging superpowers. With the guidance of his widowed mother and the memory of his father, young Dion must face complex problems ahead of his time. Fans of “Black Panther” and the “Creed” films will recognize actor Michael B. Jordan as Dion’s father.

‘Fresh Off the Boat’

‘Fresh Off the Boat’

Courtesy of Michael Ansell/ABC

“Fresh Off the Boat” follows the life of Eddie Huang, a teen hip-hop fanatic, and his Asian-American family as they adapt to life in Orlando. Despite cultural differences and the occasional dilemma, the family learns to navigate the complexities of life together. This family sitcom is available for streaming on Hulu.

‘Glitch Techs’

‘Glitch Techs’

Courtesy of Netflix

Playing video games and fighting monsters go hand-in-hand in the animated show “Glitch Techs.” Miko and High Five work at a game store during the day, but at night, they hunt video game monsters that have infiltrated the real world. Together, the two friends must level-up to handle their daily life and superhero duties. “Glitch Techs” is available on Nickelodeon and Netflix.

‘Molly of Denali’

‘Molly of Denali’

Courtesy of WGBH Educational Foundation/PBS

“Molly of Denali” is a PBS Kids animated series about an Alaska Native girl named Molly. As Molly traverses the beautiful landscape of Alaska, her dog Suki and her friends Tooey and Trini keep her company and on track. Molly uses maps, guide books, weather reports and more to help her embark on epic adventures. And for parents wanting to teach their children both on and off the screen, there are cool learning apps available on PBS Kids that will immerse children in the educational world of “Molly of Denali.”

‘Smart Guy’

‘Smart Guy’

Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Thirst Project

Disney Channel’s “Smart Guy” is a ‘90s family sitcom that follows the life of T.J., a boy genius who makes the leap from fourth grade to high school. Not only is T.J. in new waters, but he’s also treading the halls with his 14-year-old jock brother and his 16-year-old fashionista sister. The show only had three seasons, but it is worth streaming on Disney+.

‘Motown Magic’

‘Motown Magic’

Courtesy of Netflix

If you want to get up and dance while also watching a fun, educational TV show, look no further than Netflix’s “Motown Magic.” Executive produced by Motown legend Smokey Robinson, “Motown Magic” follows a young Black boy named Ben as he brings his city to life with beautiful art and the catchy sounds of Motown. Every episode is named after a classic hit, like Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition” or The Supremes’ “You Can’t Hurry Love.”

‘The Casagrandes’

‘The Casagrandes’

Courtesy of Nickelodeon

Created by the minds behind “Loud House,” “The Casagrandes” is a Nickelodeon show that emphasizes the importance of family. Ronnie Anne is an adventurous 11-year-old girl who explores her city with her loving multi-generational Mexican-American family by her side.

‘One on One’

‘One on One’

Lawrence Lucier/Getty Images

Father-daughter relationships are at the center of this early 2000s comedy. Flex Washington, a former athlete turned sportscaster, is left to care for his teenage daughter Breanna full-time after his ex-wife moves abroad. Breanna learns to navigate high school, relationships and becoming a young woman, while Flex must learn to be a full-time parent. Together, the two form an unbreakable bond.

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