Do This, Not That Stretches Slideshow

Do This, Not That Stretches Slideshow

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Bend your knee, grab your ankle and pull it up and back until you feel a stretch in the front of your thigh, then hold.

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Jog forward, kicking your heels back to your butt. Focus on achieving a fast cadence, kicking your feet back as quickly as possible and landing on the balls of your feet. Hold your arms at 90 degrees and move them similar to the way you would running, staying in sync with each kick. Maintain a strong, tall posture throughout. Butt kicks intensely work your hamstrings and, in the process, stretch your quads. “Like all dynamic stretches, the action mimics what the body will experience when running,” Hamilton says.
See it in action here.

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Sitting on the ground, place the bottoms of your feet together, let your knees fall as low as they comfortably can and, keeping your back straight, lean forward and bringing your chest towards your feet. This common warmup stretches your groin, inner thighs, hips and lower back.

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Start with feet hip distance apart and get into squat position. In a controlled manner, bound directly sideways to your left. Be sure to land softly, holding your hands together in front of your body for stabilization. Alternate bounding from side to side.
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Standing with one leg straight, lift the other leg and prop the back of your heel on a surface that is 1-3 feet off the ground, depending on your comfort level.

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As you’re walking forward, pick up one leg and bring your knee to your chest, fully bending the leg and hugging it with your arms. Slowly bring the leg back to the ground as you step forward and alternate hugging the other leg. “Walking leg hugs will stretch the hip extensors and the buttock muscles, as well as the lower back region,” says Hamilton. “They also work the hip flexor muscle group, warming it up nicely.”
See it in action here.

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Take a knee. Place your right knee on the ground with the lower leg extended behind your body, while the left leg is bent with the foot placed flat on the ground in front of your body. Slowly lean forward into your raised leg, keeping the opposite knee connected with the ground. You should feel a pull on the inside of your hips as you lean forward. Hold for 30 seconds, then switch sides.

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Take an exaggerated step forward with your left leg, slowly lowering your body by bending both knees. Your front knee should stay in line with the ankle and not go past the toes, and your trailing knee should come close to—but not touch—the ground. Come back up and lunge forward with the right leg.
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Lie on your back and pull one knee at a time to your chest, and hold. This static exercise stretches your gluteus maximus, or buttocks.

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Moving forward, quickly alternate picking up your feet and popping your knee up so your quad is parallel with your waist, and land lightly on the balls of your feet. Focus on achieving a quick vertical cadence and not on moving forward at any particular speed.
See it in action here.

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The seated twist stretches the hips and obliques, as well as the back. Sitting on the ground with your left leg straight out in front of your body, bend your right knee and cross your right leg over your left, placing that foot on the outside of the left leg. Now twist your torso towards the right and place your left elbow on the outside of your right leg.

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Get in push-up position, but keep your legs shoulder width apart. Place your left foot on the outside of your left hand, slightly bending your right leg to make the stretch. Drive the hips forward as your glute fires. Then either bring the left foot back and switch sides or, if you have room, walk your hands forward and bring your right foot up to the outside of your right hand, essential "crawling" forward through the routine.
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Stand on the edge of a step, putting all your weight on one foot. Slowly lower your heel and hold.

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Skip forward, emphasizing vertical movement. Drive your right leg up and your left arm forward, then switch sides in one fluid movement, landing softly and pushing off your toes.
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Pike stretch primarily stretches your glutes, hamstrings and calves. Standing or sitting with your legs straight, bend at the waist and touch your toes.

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Standing with your feet wider than your shoulders, bring your arms up and extend them sideways. Bend forward and rotate slightly to your right as you bring your left arm down to touch your right toe. Come back up and alternate sides for 15 to 30 seconds.
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Place your palms on a wall with one leg bent in front of you and your foot flat on the ground, while the trailing leg is straight and stretched away from the wall.

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Walk forward on your tip toes, keeping your calves flexed with each step. Keep your posture upright and your arms still to maintain balance with each step.
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Lying flat on your back, lift one leg in the air, focusing on keeping it at a 90-degree angle (or as close as you can get). Maintain the position by holding the back of your raised leg with your hands.

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Walk forward, kicking one leg straight out in front of your body with your arms extended in front of you. Bring the foot back down and kick the other leg up, always trying to get the leg parallel with your waist. A good trick is to try to kick your hands. “The benefit is that you’re doing it in a motion that mimics what the body will be going through during activity,” says Hamilton.
See it in action here.

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Lying on the ground, straighten both legs. Bring the right leg across your body, twist your torso to the left, and let the leg rest on top of your left leg.

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Hold onto an immovable object, firmly plant your left leg, and swing your right leg across your body. Keep that right foot facing forwards so your foot is sweeping sideways across your body. “The hip abductor and hip adductors will both get a dynamic stretch with this one—one gets it when you swing one way and the other gets it when you swing in the other direction,” says Hamilton. “Additionally, the muscles of the torso that contribute to hip stability will have to get working in order to keep your torso stable over your stance leg as you swing the other leg side to side.”
See it in action here.

Do This, Not That Stretches Slideshow