Tips for Helping You Cope with Daylight Saving Time from 13 Tips for Helping You Cope with Daylight Saving Time

13 Tips for Helping You Cope with Daylight Saving Time

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Tips for Helping You Cope with Daylight Saving Time

At 2 a.m. on November 5, clocks in most of the United States will “fall back” one hour, ending daylight saving time for the year. So, if you usually go to bed at 10 p.m., then, after Sunday, you’ll technically be going to bed at 9 p.m. If you wait until it is 10 p.m. as per the new clock time, you would be up until 11 p.m. before you changed the clock, so you are staying up one hour later. Moving the body’s inner clock in either direction causes it be out of sync or mismatched with a person’s existing day-night routine and habits. Adapting to this change depends on several factors.

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Go to bed later tonight

You train your body to do almost anything and that includes waking up early without feeling tired and gloomy. If you haven’t started already, you have two days. So, go to bed about 15 minutes later. The following day make it half an hour. This will steadily alter your sleep rhythm to be in sync with the time change.

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Don’t snooze

Exposing yourself to the bright light in the morning will help you adjust. You need natural light to start your day on a high note. Hitting the snooze button can mess up your entire day. Those few minutes are not worth throwing off your internal clock. When the alarm goes off, adrenaline kicks in, and your body is ready to get up and go. Hit the snooze to catch some extra Zzz’s and your body and mind become confused making you feel worn-out.

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Eat the right foods

Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by the body’s pineal gland. It is inactive during the day and gets turned on at night when it’s dark. When the levels of melatonin in your bloodstream rise, you start to feel sleepy and less alert. You can adjust by consuming the proper nutrients. Have some walnuts and sunflower, which are an excellent source of Vitamin B6; and eat some cherries, which provide naturally-occurring melatonin. Focus on fruits and vegetables which contain other key nutrients that promote the body’s natural synthesis of melatonin.

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Change the lighting in your home

You need the right setting to fall asleep and to wake up, and stay awake. Open the curtains or lift the shades as you soon as you wake up. Dim the lights at night as you’re getting ready to go to bed. This will help you relax and make it easier to fall asleep.

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Install a night light

Try installing dimmer switches on lights so you can have adequate light throughout the day and just enough light at night. Reduce lighting at least an hour prior to bedtime.

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Avoid naps

The best kind of nap is 20-30 minutes long and taken around the same time during the day. But avoid extended naps after 4 p.m. because they can mess with your ability to fall asleep later. Sleeping during the day can disrupt the ease of bedtime during the night hours. If it’s 6 p.m. and you feel tired try to stay active to trigger endorphins.

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Turn off all electronics

Forget about phones, laptops, iPads, etc. Your body needs darkness to produce melatonin, which puts you to sleep. The brightness from the screen of your smart phone or tablet prevents that from happening.

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Take a warm bath

study has shown how the body temperature naturally dips at night, beginning about two hours before sleep, reaching its lowest point around 4 a.m. That’s why artificially raising your temperature by taking a bath, hot shower, or going into a sauna may be a good idea. It will fall around bedtime, encouraging rest. The drop in temperature is a signal to your body that it’s time to sleep.

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Don’t drink coffee or alcohol

Alcohol is eliminated from the body rapidly and causes withdrawal symptoms two or three hours later, which have a negative reaction. Studies have shown that in healthy people, acute high alcohol doses disturb sleep. Caffeine, a stimulant, is a bad idea because it affects sleep adversely. It stays in your body for more than seven hours, experts say.

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Do 10-minute workouts in the evening

When you exercise, serotonin is released in your brain to help your body adjust to changes. A brisk walk will do. It will get your heart pumping, which is all you need. Energy levels start to plummet in the late afternoon. Exercising is a good strategy to boost your energy just enough to stay awake without interfering later with the quality of your sleep. Do some jumping and jogging with a few resistance exercises.

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Exercise in bright light

Set aside some 30-40 minutes to be out in the open when the sun is out. It definitely helps – a morning walk gives you a daylight boost as well as some exercise. Embrace natural light. A study found that people who were exposed to natural light during the day had a more restful sleep at night.

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Don’t eat late

Eating causes secretion of acid in the stomach which then goes to the esophagus. Unfortunately, the body has to be awake to get rid of it. That’s just how physiology works. This is counterproductive if you’re trying to fall asleep. Make your last meal at least four hours before bedtime.

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Wear ear plugs and eye mask

Wearing ear plugs and eye masks can be quite useful if you need something to keep the noise and light from outside reaching your bed. Consider using ear plugs to block out sound and an eye mask to block out light especially if you are a light sleeper.

13 Tips for Helping You Cope with Daylight Saving Time