Reasons You’re Tired All the Time that Have Nothing to Do with Sleep from Reasons You’re Tired All the Time that Have Nothing to Do with Sleep

Reasons You’re Tired All the Time that Have Nothing to Do with Sleep

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Reasons You’re Tired All the Time that Have Nothing to Do with Sleep

Fatigue is different from drowsiness, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Drowsiness is feeling the need to sleep, but fatigue is a lack of energy and motivation. It can be a normal and important response to chronic shortage of sleep, but also to emotional stress, hormonal changes and diseases

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Your thyroid isn’t functioning properly

Fatigue is a very important sign of low thyroid. Since hyperthyroidism increases your metabolism, many individuals initially have a lot of energy, according to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. However, as the hyperthyroidism continues, the body tends to break down, so being tired is very common. If you are constantly tired after sleeping enough hours and not doing a strenuous activity, check your thyroid gland.  

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You’re not physically active enough

The price of leading an inactive lifestyle is high and it comes in the form of physical pain, tiredness, and obesity. It is common knowledge that people who work out on regular basis have more energy. In fact, cancer patients’ symptoms improved when they began exercising more, a study shows. Other research suggests that light exercise reduced feelings of fatigue by as much as 65 percent and boosted energy levels by 20 percent.

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You’re eating the wrong food

This is not rocket science – the body needs proper fuel to function properly and that means feeding it healthy foods with enough nutrients. The worse food you put in your body, the worse you will feel. Don’t fill up on refined sugar, complex carbs and processed foods. Unhealthy eating habits lead to inflammation, which causes oxidative stress (imbalance between the production of free radicals and the ability of the body to detoxify their harmful effects), making you look older and feel exhausted.

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You’re dehydrated

Dehydration is making you sick in more than one way. Lack of water slows everything in the body down, including cell function, leaving you feeling sleepy and tired. Blood volume drops, which makes the heart work harder. Adequate hydration is dependent on many different factors, such as your size, activity levels and sweat rate. The best indicator of your hydration is your urine. Someone who is well-hydrated will produce clear or light-colored urine. Dark-colored urine is a sign of dehydration.

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You’re depressed

There is a huge difference between feeling sad and being clinically depressed. The latter should never be ignored. Symptoms vary with every patient but one common consequence is decreased energy levels. This if often the result of another common symptom – loss of appetite. Also, studies have shown that some of the medications used to treat major depressive disorder can induce symptoms of fatigue as side effects.

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Your house is cluttered

Remove as many little messes from your life as possible. By cleaning your life up, you will clear your cluttered mind. These will be things such as clearing out your closets of all the clothes you haven't worn for two years, shredding all the statements and paperwork you don't need anymore, removing the clutter from your kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Eliminating these distractions and messes from your life is like untangling a knot inside of you.

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You lack iron

Fatigue is a sign you need more iron in your diet. If you don’t have enough iron, there is less oxygen going to your muscles, which then have no energy, leaving you feeling exhausted and weak. Hemoglobin is a protein that helps red blood cells deliver oxygen throughout your body.

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You may have diabetes

Diabetes symptoms can be subtle which is why people often don’t know they have the disease for months. Food goes into the digestive tract and is broken down into smaller molecules of nutrients for the blood to absorb and carry to cells throughout the body. When it doesn’t have the transporter anymore, which is the insulin, the cells don’t get the energy they need and are starving. All the sugar is stuck in the blood and you feel exhausted.

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You have arthritis

Fatigue often comes with arthritis pain, according to the Arthritis Foundation. Dealing with pain day to day can wear you down and cause exhaustion. The inflammatory cytokines (proteins in the blood) released in arthritis are the same ones released when you have a bad cold or the flu. The result is extreme tiredness in both cases.

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You’re pregnant

Fatigue, along with frequent urination, is a very common early sign of pregnancy. Your body is a one-man factory working 24/7. Blame it in all the hormonal changes, especially in progesterone, you’re going through. The body is working harder, producing more blood to carry nutrients to the fetus. Glucose levels and blood pressure drop, leaving you feeling even more tired.

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You’re drinking too much

Booze is not stored the same way fat or carbs are. The body has to work harder, which makes you tired. Alcohol depletes important minerals that are essential to the recovery process, especially after a workout. People who have been drinking fall asleep quicker, but alcohol reduces rapid eye movement (REM), which is when you dream and actually rest, so you feel tired when you wake up.

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You have an infection

Infection, especially one that takes a long time to recover from or treat, such as bacterial endocarditis (infection of the heart muscle or valves), parasitic infections, hepatitis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) AIDS, tuberculosis, and mononucleosis (Epstein-Barr virus) can cause fatigue, according to National Institutes of Health. Doctors will also look for signs of chronic fatigue if they are checking for Lyme disease.

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You have food intolerance

Any food – whether dairy, grains or even chocolate – that a person is allergic to causes a great deal of extra stress on the body. Naturally, the body’s immune system will try to fight it, resulting in inflammation that can range from joint pain to headaches to a swelling in the small intestine. There really is no definitive test to tell if you have food intolerance – remove certain groups and then add them back to notice any changes in how you feel.

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You drink too much coffee

Caffeine is one of the most dangerous legal drugs on the market. The problem is when people drink too much of it – or more than 3-4 cups a day. The safe amount for most healthy adults is 300-400 mg a day, which is equivalent to two 5-Hour Energy shots, one Starbucks Venti brewed coffee, and 2.5 16 fl. oz. Monster energy drinks. Anything more than that can lead to arrhythmia, chest pain and even death.

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Certain medications

Many medications for migraines and depression cause fatigue because they increase the level of serotonin in the body, which helps produce melatonin, the sleep hormone, leaving you feeling sleepy. Tiredness is a common side effect of drugs that regulate blood pressure as well, according to AARP. They slow down the pumping action of the heart and depress the entire central nervous system.

Reasons You’re Tired All the Time that Have Nothing to Do with Sleep