Put These Foods On Your Face for Incredible Skin from Put These Foods On Your Face for Incredible Skin

Put These Foods On Your Face for Incredible Skin

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Put These Foods On Your Face for Incredible Skin
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Put These Foods On Your Face for Incredible Skin

Skin, the largest organ of the body, is its protective shield against harmful light, heat, and infection. You want to keep it not only healthy, but glowing as well. The good news is that you don’t have to spend a fortune for products; you can simply feed your skin.

Avocados
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Avocados

In addition to its many superpowers when it comes to nutrition, avocadoes are great when applied topically because they are rich in Vitamin E. It needs the antioxidant to neutralize free radicals, which damage cells, and to nourish the skin from within. Vitamin E oil is recommended if you want to treat stretch marks. When used as a moisturizer it helps prevent or treat dry, flaking skin.

Cucumbers
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Cucumbers

You have most likely seen your mom, a friend or someone on TV putting cucumbers under their eyes. There is a good reason for that. People have been using the vegetable as a solution to every imagine skin problem from acne to scars, wrinkles and laugh lines. The high water and antioxidant content in cucumbers makes them ideal “helpers” for hydrating the skin. The vitamin C and caffeic acid in cucumber help prevent water retention, which is they are good to put on puffy eyes.

Strawberries
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Strawberries

Vitamin C and folic acid – all of which strawberries have in abundance – are what makes the fruit (and berries in general) so good for the skin. Vitamin C fights free radicals that destroy collagen, and folic acid helps in cell regeneration. Strawberries are helpful if you have acne because they are acidic nature. That enables them to remove excess oil in the skin. The fruit is also a natural cleanser because of its salicylic acid. It helps clear away dead cells.

Coconut and olive oil
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Coconut and olive oil

Plant oils are increasingly recognized for their effects on both skin diseases and the restoration of cutaneous homeostasis, research shows. They have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on the skin, promoting wound healing and repairing of skin barrier. Coconut oil has been shown to be as effective and safe as mineral oil when applied as moisturizers for mild to moderate xerosis. Olive oil has antibacterial properties, studies show.

Turmeric
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Turmeric

Growing evidence shows that an active component of turmeric, curcumin, may be used medically to treat a variety of dermatologic conditions such as acne, atopic dermatitis, facial photoaging, and psoriasis. Studies have noted statistically significant improvement in skin disease severity in the turmeric/curcumin treatment groups compared with control groups.

Cocoa
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Cocoa

Raw cocoa is incredibly rich in flavanols, a type of antioxidant. Clinical and bench research has begun to provide scientific validation for the use of cocoa-derived phytochemicals as an effective approach for skin protection. Cocoa components with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory activities contribute to endogenous photoprotection and are crucial for the maintenance of skin health.

Yogurt
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Yogurt

What makes it good is probiotics. Evidence is growing for the use of probiotics in the treatment of acne. Probiotics modify several factors in the pathophysiology of acne development and can potentially improve compliance as well. Early studies suggest that probiotics might alter several aspects of skin aging, which is subject to UV light, pollution, infections, and cigarette smoking. Probiotics may slow aging of the skin by helping to restore the balance between free radical scavengers and the free radical production.

Green tea
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Green tea

Several experimental studies show that green tea possess anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic potential, which can be exploited against a variety of skin disorders. Supplementation of skin care products with green tea may have a significant impact on skin health. Topical and oral consumption of green tea has shown significant protective effects against UV-induced skin damage and immunosuppression.

Orange peel
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Orange peel

The usual suspect is Vitamin C, which fights free radicals that kill skin cells and add a glowing shine to the skin. It has a lot of calcium as well, which helps regulate skin functions, especially in renewing worn out cells and preventing cell DNA damage. Also, imonene, which is found in citrus peel, has demonstrated efficacy in preclinical models of breast and colon cancers.

Pomegranate
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Pomegranate

Due to its strong antioxidant activity and is abundance of anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and hydrolysable tannins, the fruit and its oil have shown to exert anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and anti-tumorigenic properties. This makes pomegranate a promising chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent.

Red wine
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Red wine

Some compounds found in grapes help to protect skin cells from the sun's ultraviolet radiation, according to a study. Some polyphenolic substances extracted from grapes (flavonoids) can reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species in human epidermis cells that have been exposed to long-wave (UVA) and medium-wave (UVB) ultraviolet radiation, meaning they have a protective effect against ultraviolet radiation emitted by the sun.

Carrots
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Carrots

The vitamin C in carrots has healing properties. It helps the skin heal faster from external wounds. The beta-carotene, which is vitamin A, reduces inflammation. It fights acne, builds new skin tissue, and prevent wrinkling. Vitamins in carrots also help in the production of collagen, which is crucial in preventing premature aging.

Sea salt
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Sea salt

If you have ever gotten any treatment at a spa, you probably have had sea salt on your body. This is because it significantly improves skin barrier function, according to research. Skin hydration was enhanced, which means moisturized skin. Also, skin roughness and redness of the skin were significantly reduced after bathing in the salt solution.

Lemon
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Lemon

Lemon is full of Vitamin C, which can help skin damage from UV rays. The antioxidant properties of a natural compound isolated from lemon oil is endowed with a strong antioxidant activity and that it is capable of inhibiting free radical-mediated reactions, according to a study. Topical application significantly increases the antioxidative potential of skin biosurface, thus highlighting the effectiveness of a natural antioxidant biotechnology in the antiaging management of skin.

Cinnamon
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Cinnamon

Cinnamon has anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties helpful for treating acne. It also helps to shrink pores. This makes the skin smoother and more even, research has found. Cinnamon is often used as a face mask together with honey, which also has antimicrobial properties.

Pumpkin
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Pumpkin

If you read the labels of skin care products, you probably see pumpkin as an ingredients on almost all of them. At the very least, this is because pumpkin is moisturizing. Also, pumpkins have vitamins C and E which fight harmful substances and keep the skin firm and with barely any wrinkles. The vegetable helps exfoliate dead skin. Extracted oil from pumpkin has also been used in wound healing treatments.

Eggplant
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Eggplant

The skin of the eggplant is rich in potassium, magnesium, as well as antioxidants such as vitamin C and E. They help protect the skin against the sun’s harsh UV rays. This, in turn, delays the appearance of wrinkles, dark spots and other unwelcome aging signs.

Put These Foods On Your Face for Incredible Skin