La Casa del Arbol in Baños in Ecuador from Places on Earth You Should Add Seeing to Your Bucket List

Places on Earth You Should Add Seeing to Your Bucket List

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Places on Earth You Should Add Seeing to Your Bucket List

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Quitting a job and traveling around the world, checking off one bucket list destination each month, sounds more like a movie script than a realistic plan. It often takes years between visits to places a person has dreamed of for a long time, as many explorers need to save money and plan accordingly. Mountains, parks, lakes, forests, islands and “lost” cities – all of these breathtaking locations are worthy of being any adventurer’s ultimate trip destinations.  

La Casa del Arbol in Baños in Ecuador

Photo Modified: Flickr/ Rinaldo Wurglitsch CC BY 2.0

This is a small treehouse, the nickname of which is “the end of the world.” Visitors get to swing over a gorge at the edge of a canyon without any safety measures.

See: World’s Epic Tree Houses You Can Actually Stay In

It feels like you’re flying into a void above clouds. You’ll have to go there early in the morning if you want to avoid waiting in long lines.

Sea of Stars on Vaadhoo Island in the Maldives

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The mesmerizing island is best known for the “sea of stars.” At first glance, the water looks like a mirror, reflecting the glittering stars from the dark sky. 

See: Most Spectacular Places to Go Camping Under the Stars

The glowing waves of the surreal beach are caused by bioluminescence, a natural chemical reaction generated by phytoplankton, marine microbes disturbed by oxygen.  

The Great Wall, China

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The Great Wall hosts one of the most famous half marathons in the world. It is also one of the most spectacular places to see the sunrise.

See: 30 Eye Candy Travel Photos That Will Blow Your Mind

The landmark was continuously built from the 3rd century BC to the 17th century AD. The complete route is about 12,500 miles.

Victoria Falls, Zambia/Zimbabwe

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This is one of the greatest attractions in all of Africa, and a waterfall you should add to your bucket list.

See: Most Incredible Waterfalls for Kayaking

It is classified as the world’s largest sheet of falling water with a width of 5,604 feet and height of 354 feet. The trip from Victoria Falls to about 17 miles downstream is a mixture of huge flows and significant drops.

Plitvice Lakes in Croatia

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The 16 lakes falling into one another creating a series of waterfalls and cascades make for one of the most beautiful sights in the world.

See: 15 Most Spectacular Lakes in the World

The waters flowing over the limestone and chalk have, over thousands of years, deposited travertine barriers, create natural dams which in turn have created a series of beautiful lakes, caves and waterfalls, according to UNESCO.

Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia

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Salar de Uyuni is one of the most mysterious places in the world. Formed as a result of transformations between many prehistoric lakes, Salar de Uyuni is the world’s largest salt flat.

See: Where is the Atacama Desert and Why You Need to Add It to Your Bucket List

Because of the large, flat area and clear skies, it is often used for calibrating altimeters of Earth observation satellites. It also creates a dream-like reflection off of the crust.

Iceland

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“The land of fire and ice” has become a popular tourist destination for its thermal pools, waterfalls, icebergs and beautiful landmarks.

See: The Most Thrilling Adventures in Iceland

Don’t pass on a chance to relax in the Blue Lagoon or hike the Svinafellsjokull (Pig Mountain) Glacier. The best time to see the Northern Lights is between September and mid-April because the nights then are very dark.

Meteora in Greece

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Christians used to go to the monastery for absolute isolation, peace and harmony, according to Visit Meteora. The massive rocks are perched at a maximum height of 1,200 feet.

See: 15 Lesser-Known Ancient Places Around the World

This place is a phenomenon of vast monolithic pillars and hills that have formed enormous rounded boulders. They are mystical yet serene and breathtaking.

Tianzi Mountains, China

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Tianzi Mountain makes up a “golden triangle” along with Zhangjiajie Forest Park and Suoxiyu Valley. The main peak dwarfs others and rises 4,152 feet.

See: Visit These Beautiful Places Before You Die

Its sea of clouds, snow-covered peaks and wavelike rocky peaks are stunning sights. The best time for a visit is in the spring and fall, especially in April and October.

Petra, Jordan

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The famous archaeological site in Jordan’s southwestern desert is one of the official New 7 Wonders of the World. The prehistoric city was “lost” for centuries.

See: Craziest Adventures to Check Off Before You Die

Petra, carved into red, white, pink, and sandstone cliff faces, was the flourishing capital of the Nabataean empire between 400 B.C. and A.D. 106, according to National Geographic.

Antelope Canyon in Arizona

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Antelope Canyon is one of the most photographed canyons in the American Southwest. It is made up of two canyons.

See: Mind-Blowing Colors Found in Nature

The upper is approximately 4,000 feet in elevation. When the sunlight shines in the colors of the canyon, they appear to vibrate off of the walls. The canyon looks red, gold and orange.

Amazon Rainforest

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The lure of the Amazon rainforest is a draw for the most ambitious of adventurers and an excursion that delivers many rewards in the form of unspoiled wilderness and wildlife.

See: Spectacular Rainforests Around the World

Try to catch one of Amazonia’s fearsome piranhas, swim on a beach in the rich red/brown waters of the Rio Negro, take jungle walks, explore the river’s edge at night with spotlights, visit an indigenous village, and navigate in canoes through Anavilhanas National Park.

Naica Mine, Mexico

Also known as Cave of the Crystals, Crystal Caves is a working mine that contains some of the largest natural crystals in the world.

See: Otherworldly Landscapes on Planet Earth

The crystals were formed from underground magma. Professional supervision is required to enter the cave. More than 10 minutes of exposure in this environment can be extremely dangerous.

Mount Roraima, Venezuela

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Mount Roraima is one of the oldest mountain formations on the planet. Surrounded by Venezuela, Brazil, and Guyana, all four sides are sheer 1,300-foot high cliffs.

See: The Most Mysterious Places Around the World

While its cliff walls are only scalable by the most experienced of climbers, there is a path up the mountain’s natural ramp-like path, usually a two-day hike, according to Atlas Obscura.

Antarctica

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Antarctica is the coldest, driest, highest and windiest continent in the world, making it one of the world’s most dangerous places for camping.

See: The Most Thrilling Adventures in Antarctica

Campers set up enough below the ground to provide shelter from the wind overnight and usually sleep in sleeping bags and bivy sacs, which provide more warmth than tents.

Hang Son Doong, Vietnam

Photo Modified: Flickr / vtoanstar / CC BY 4.0

This is the world’s largest cave. Collapses caused by erosion leave small and big holes through which sunlight penetrates and creates stunning views.

See: Caves You Can Actually Stay In Around the World

Hike through the cave which was created 2-5 million years ago by river water eroding away the limestone underneath the mountain.

Sagano Bamboo Forest in Japan

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Japan's Sagano Bamboo Forest is without a doubt one of the most beautiful groves on the planet. The soaring green stalks move with the wind, colliding and twisting.

See: The 50 Most Instagram Worthy Travel Locations Around the World

Hike along the Bamboo Forest paths that are more than 1,640 feet long. You can also rent a bike for a relaxing ride through the majestic place.

Great Barrier Reef, Australia

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The Great Barrier Reef is Australia’s natural wonder. This famous place is one of the seven wonders of the natural world.

See: The World’s Most Spectacular Parks and Nature Preserves

It is larger than the Great Wall of China and the only living thing on earth visible from space. The lavishness of the reef’s marine life, which comprises of over 3,000 individual reef systems, coral cays, tropical islands and stunning golden beaches, make for breathtaking views.

Yellowstone National Park

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Yellowstone, the very first national park established in the world, is one of the most famous recreational areas in the U.S.

See: The Best Active Adventures to do in Yellowstone National Park

The 3,500 miles stretching from Wyoming to Montana and Idaho are also among the most visited. See the largest active geyser field in the world and the most renowned geyser, see grizzly bears in their natural habitat, and go on an amazing whitewater rafting trip.

Turquoise Ice at Northern Lake Baikal, Russia

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The turquoise ice of Lake Baikal is where giant debris of transparent ice give off a beautiful turquoise hue.

See: 15 Most Spectacular Lakes in the World

This monstrous Siberian lake is known for its overwhelming beauty, but it’s also the largest (by volume) freshwater lake in the world, the deepest. At nearly 25 million years old, it is widely considered the world’s oldest lake, too.