The Most Breathtaking Abandoned Places on the Planet from The Most Breathtaking Abandoned Places on the Planet

The Most Breathtaking Abandoned Places on the Planet

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The Most Breathtaking Abandoned Places on the Planet

Do you ever wonder what the world would look like if humans were gone? You don’t have to imagine anymore. There are certain places - some have been fairly well-documented - which show exactly what would happen.

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Kolmanskop, Namibia

Kolmanskop was once the site of a diamond rush and a bustling city for German miners, according to Naminibian.org. Eventually, it peaked and saw its decline after World War I when inhabitants left in search of new diamond deposits. Many of the buildings still stand, but much of the city has been claimed by sand. It gives off eerie vibes that attract curious souls — including ghost hunters — from all over the world. 

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The Tunnel of Love, Ukraine

The tunnel, which stretches just over half a mile, is the most romantic sight in Ukraine. The legend goes that a couple can make a wish together; and if the love is real, then it will come true. The best time to go to see it fully engulfed in green colors is between May and August.

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Olympics Bobsleigh Track, Bosna and Herzegovina

It was damaged during the bloody conflict in the region in the early 90’s. The luge and bobsled track used as an artillery stronghold – and battlement and storage for their fighting and weapons. Smithsonian Magazine reports that “some defensive holes, drilled by troops, can still be seen in the track’s concrete walls.” The Siege of Sarajevo left over 10,000. One makeshift cemetery is located in the middle of the 1984 Winter Olympics arena.

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Buzludzha Monument, Bulgaria

If you look at the monument, which was built as a socialist assembly hall, from afar, it looks like a space station. This is where the Battle of Shipka, one of the most significant in Bulgarian history, was fought. Every year, the country’s Socialist Party organizes a fair for members. Recently, the monument was a movie location for the action thriller Mechanic: Resurrection, in which Jason Statham and Jessica Alba are starring.

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Christ of the Abyss, Italy

Flooded and then cemented to the sea floor of the Mediterranean over half a century ago, the underwater statue of Cristo degli Abissi is one of the most famous dive destinations in the entire country. It is found in the waters between Camogli and Portofino, and it commemorates the diver (and the first Italian to use SCUBA gear), Dario Gonzetti, who died during a dive near the spot in 1950, according to Italy Beyond the Obvious.

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SS Ayrfield, Australia

It is better known as the “floating forest.” Many tourists and local photographers go to see the giant mangrove trees that are now growing in the 105-year-old transport ship. Homebush Bay in the heart of Sydney was designated a shipwreck yard in 1966. The ship, build in 1911 and deployed for wartime activities, was supposed to be dismantled in 1972 but the ship yard closed too soon.

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Bannerman Castle, New York

This Scottish-style castle, set 50 miles north of New York City, was built by Francis Bannerman in 1901. He made his money by supplying military goods and used the castle as storage for arms and ammunition. After his death in 1918, construction stopped and the destruction of the castle began. An explosion and a fire took its toll. Visitors can explore the island and abandoned castle through guided tours.

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Hirta Island, Scotland

Hirta was once home to a thriving community. Stone tools and Bronze Age quarry found on Mullach Sgar, a mountain on Hirta, suggest people had lived on the islands for at least two millennia, if not more, according to Atlas Obscura. The early 20th century saw a gradual erosion of the islanders’ traditional ways of life, which included sheep farming, weaving, and fishing.

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Bodiam Castle, England

If you ever want a glimpse of medieval splendor, visit the Bodiam Castle. It’s surrounded lavish green foliage which is iconic for the region of East Sussex. The castle was built by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, who had once been a knight of Edward III, in in 1385, mainly with the intention of defending this area against the potentially invading armies of France during The Hundred Years War.

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Miranda Castle, Belgium

The “Noisy Castle,” which has been silent for a quarter of a century, was built in the 19th-century in a neo-Gothic style. It is in danger of being demolished after a severe storm in 2006 damaged the structure, according to The Weather Channel. Families used to go in the summer and German troops occupied it for a bit during World War Two. The castle was abandoned in 1991 after unsuccessful attempts to sell it and turn it into a hotel.

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Angkor Wat, Cambodia

Angkor is the capital of an empire that once controlled most of South East Asia. Angkor Wat is the temple that takes center stage. The temple took 30 years to build and soon after it was finished the city was abandoned. Theories about what happened include attacks on the city and a lack of resources. Approximately 5 million tons of sandstone was used to build the Angkor Wat.

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City Hall Subway, NYC, New York

City Hall was the ceremonial terminal of the first subway project in New Yorkaccording to Columbia University. Tt has a sharply curved platform, a Guastavino tile arched ceiling, skylights (blackened in World War II), and plaques praising the work and those involved. It was in service from 1904 until 1945. Not everyone can see the station – you have to pass a background check first.

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Valle dei Mulini, Italy

This old Italian mill was once a grain mill powered by spring waters. There were several flour mills, built from stone as far back as the 13th century. They grounded all the types of wheat needed by locals, according to Atlas Obscura. After the milling of flour was largely shifted to nearby pasta mills, the sunken area became obsolete and the buildings were closed and abandoned in the 1940s. 

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Great Train Graveyard, Bolivia

This junkyard is where Bolivia’s trains were left to rot. The train cemetery is just outside of the city of Uyuni, which is more popular for its stunning salt flats. Most of the engines and rail cars date back to the 19th century and were imported from Britain. Some locomotives, however, still look as if they have a few more trips in them despite all the rust and holes.  

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Pripyat, Ukraine

This is probably the most famous abandoned place in the world. The Ukraine city of Pripyat was home to 49,000 residents until it was evacuated and abandoned following the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. Although the area remains abandoned, it’s been deemed safe to visit and some outfitters there offer guided tours of the site.

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Craco, Italy

People had lived in the hilltop village on the southern end of Italy in Basilicata, near the heel of the boot since the 10th century B.C. But now the town of Craco has stood uninhabited for half a century, according to Ancient Origins. “Here, dark windows look out at potential travelers like empty eye sockets and the streets and buildings of this medieval town seems to have literally been vacated overnight, left to crumble in decay.”

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Ross Island, India

You can’t help but feel as if you are in the Jungle Book movie. Ross Island is former administrative headquarters for the British in the Andamans. It was nicknamed the “Paris of the East.” What remains are some old houses, a church, a bazaar, several stores, a large swimming pool and a small hospital. Visitors are welcome to visit. There are a few brick walkways traversing the settlement.

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Kilchurn Castle, Scotland

Kilchurn Castle was built in the mid-1400s. It was abandoned in the 1700s, according to Visit Scotland. The castle comprised a five-story tower-house at one corner of an irregular-shaped courtyard. The tower house still stands substantially complete, overshadowing the rest of the complex. The castle is one of the most photographed structures in the country because of its dramatic situation – at the head of Loch Awe, with the peak of Ben Cruachan visible.

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Spreepark, Germany

With its rusting rides and a Ferris wheel turning idly in the wind, the eerie defunct East German amusement park fascinates locals and tourists alikeaccording to local media. It opened in 1969; it was the only park of its type in both East and West Berlin. The park closed after the owner went bankrupt. The abandoned dinosaur attractions, Ferris wheels and swan boats give visitors a cold, creepy chill.

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Nara Dreamland, Japan

The park opened in 1961 and closed in 2006. It was designed after the Disneyland amusement park in California. The entrance looks like Sleeping Beauty’s castle. The wooded rollercoaster makes you think of the famous Cyclone in Coney Island in New York. The park could not keep up after Universal Studio Japan opened in Osaka.

The Most Breathtaking Abandoned Places on the Planet