How Your Gut Bacteria May Be Making You Fat from How Your Gut Bacteria May Be Making You Fat

How Your Gut Bacteria May Be Making You Fat

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How Your Gut Bacteria May Be Making You Fat

When people think of what affects their health the most, working out and eating right usually comes to mind first. They are, of course, true but there is another very important factor – your gut. The gut microbiome consists of all the different types of microorganisms, estimated to be about 100 trillion bacteria alone — outnumbering the 10 trillion human cells that make up your body by about 10 to 1 — that coexists within a person’s gastrointestinal tract.

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Not enough fiber

The bacteria living in the colon break down the fiber people get from plant-based food. Fiber is one of the most important nutrients the body needs to function properly. The mineral helps prevent heart problems, diabetes and even some types of cancer. It’s also an important player in maintaining weight and losing extra pounds because it improves digestive health. A study found that overweight people who were put on a lower-calorie, higher-fiber diet lose weight and the community of bacteria in their guts became more diverse.

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Overuse of antibiotics

The trillions of probiotic bacteria that live in your gut – the good and the bad – can be wiped out by overuse of antibiotics, which is a common health concern nowadays. (Of the 154 million prescriptions for antibiotics every year, 30 percent are unnecessary, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.) These drugs disrupt the integrity of the intestinal microbiome. It’s important to restore that valuable intestinal flora right away. You can start by eating some of the best foods for gut health.

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Too much stress

It’s fairly common knowledge that excessive amounts of stress hormones have a significant impact on a person’s weight, digestion and the immune system. Research has shown that stress can change the balance of bacteria that naturally live in the gut. The bacterial communities in the intestine became less diverse, and had greater numbers of potentially harmful bacteria.

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LPL and fat cells

Gut bacteria affect the absorption of nutrients in several ways including by boosting the making of an enzyme that is responsible from transporting glucose into the bloodstream. They also stop LPL, or lipoprotein lipase, which is an enzyme you need because it hinders the ability of fat cells to take up fatty acids from the blood. This means that suppressing LPL leads to an increase in fat storage.

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Storing fat

Too much gut bacteria may lead to the break down of fiber into fatty acids, which can lead to fat deposits in the liver. This put people at higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome, which may leads to diabetes, weight gain and heart problems. During an experiment with mice aimed at studying the gut microbiota and its relationship to obesity, researchers found that mice without any gut bacteria ate 29 percent more food but had 42 percent less body fat than mice raised normally.

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Glucose balance

Gut bacteria alter the way the body balances glucose levels in the blood, studies suggest. An Israeli study found that artificial sweeteners enhance the populations of gut bacteria that are more efficient at pulling energy from food and turning that energy into fat. Disruptions in the gut microbiota can lead to insulin resistance, which leads to higher blood sugar levels. Big swings in your blood sugar levels can make you feel exhausted and increase the risk of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

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Hunger hormones

The bacteria in your gut may be affecting your appetite, research shows. About 20 minutes after a meal, gut microbes produce proteins that can suppress food intake. These proteins, when injected into mice and rats, act on the brain reducing appetite. They influence the release of gut-brain signals and activate appetite-regulated neurons in the brain.

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Metabolism

The gut bacteria affect the body’s metabolism, the process through which the body converts what a person eats into energy. Mice that receive gut bacteria transplants from overweight humans are known to gain more weight than mice transplanted with gut bacteria from normal weight subjects, even when the mice are fed the same diet, according to a new study. You can boost your metabolism by following several simple and easy rules such as drinking lots of water, building muscle, and eat smaller meals more frequently.

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Inflammation

Inflammation is a defense reaction of the body against injury. In this case the injury is altered gut microbial ecosystems. Some metabolic disorders are thought to be associated with an inflammation-related composition of the gut microbiota, according to research. External factors such as stress and food affect the gut microbial composition and the effectiveness of microbial functions.

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Diabetes

An unhealthy gut can contribute to diseases like diabetes. Gut bacteria invading colon lining has been linked to Type 2 diabetes. Also, new research suggests that the most successful treatment for the condition may work by changing the makeup of gut bacteria. Metformin at least partly works by encouraging the growth of gut bacteria that can influence blood sugar levels.

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Working out

In addition to bringing a tremendous amount of health benefits to the body, exercise can encourage the growth of a variety of gut bacteria. Research on mice found that those who were exercising had a different composition of microbiota than sedentary mice. Exercise is able to enrich the microflora diversity which helps with weight loss, obesity-associated pathologies, and gastrointestinal disorders that may lead to obesity.

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Probiotics

People who are looking to support immune and digestive health or have recently taken antibiotics should consider a probiotic supplement. Probiotics help balance the good and bad bacteria in the body. A recent study suggests that consuming probiotics promotes weight loss and reduces Body Mass Index (BMI).

How Your Gut Bacteria May Be Making You Fat