Foods That Nutritionists Would Never Eat on Thanksgiving from Foods That Nutritionists Would Never Eat on Thanksgiving

Foods That Nutritionists Would Never Eat on Thanksgiving

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Foods That Nutritionists Would Never Eat on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving may just be the only day of the year when people can find any excuse to indulge in their favorite foods. The typical holiday meal is made up of delicious dishes that are usually better when eaten together. However, delightful for the taste buds does not always mean healthy for the body.

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Full-fat dips

Just because you are dipping vegetables in it doesn’t mean it’s healthy for you. Full-fat dips such as ranch should be avoided at all costs. According to SELFNutritionData, one tbsp. has 8g of fat, 1g of saturated fat, 122mg of sodium and 5mg of cholesterol. Instead try a cucumber or hummus dip.

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Candied yams

Yams are a good choice but candied yams not so much. Between the sugar, marshmallows and butter, you’re looking at tons of calories. According to myfitnesspal.com, in 0.5 cup of cooked candied yams there are 242 calories, 2g of fat, 146mg of sodium, 28mg of cholesterol and 42g of total carbs.

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Green bean casserole

Just because it has veggies doesn’t mean it’s a healthy dish. Green bean casserole consists of cream and fried onions, making it extremely high in calories and packed with sodium and fat. According to calorieking.com just one cup of Green Giant green bean casserole frozen has 166 calories, 12g of fat, 12g of carbs, and a whopping 948mg of sodium.

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Mashed potatoes

This common side dish is one to look out for. Traditionally prepared mashed potatoes that are combined with butter and milk contains over 200 calories in just one cup. They are not only high in calories but they have unhealthy amounts of sodium, cholesterol and fat as well.

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Cornbread

This popular Thanksgiving side may not look harmful, but the truth is that nutritionists do their best to avoid it. Two of its main ingredients include milk and eggs, while sweeter versions include sugar. One piece of cornbread prepared from a recipe made with low fat (2 percent) milk contains 173 calories, 5g of fat, 26mg of cholesterol, and 428mg of sodium, according to SELFNutritionData.

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Gluten

“We are no longer eating the gluten that our parents were 30 years ago,” Angela Martindale, a celebrity nutritionist, says. “The hybrid wheat of today contains new proteins that were not found in the wheat of yesterday, and those hybrid proteins can be responsible for systemic inflammation, intolerance and celiac allergies. Stay away to prevent bloating and other intestinal issues that not only cause discomfort but can also make you feel lethargic and sick at the same time, she adds.

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Alcohol

“The liver receives alcohol as a toxin so when you consume alcohol with a meal, your liver works on breaking down and flushing the alcohol first, leaving the breakdown of food nutrients being the second priority,” Martindale says. “This means your body burns empty calories for energy before nutrient rich calories, and when it really needs the energy from food nutrients, it has already stored them as fat.” Also, alcohol may stimulate your appetite even more, Vitamin Shoppe Nutritionist Brian Tanzer, MS, CNS, says. “Alcohol can cause you to lose your inhibitions making you a lot less conscious about what you’re eating.”

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Stuffing

“Thanksgiving dishes I would try and avoid would be the stuffing, 1 cup is 356 calories and has 17.2 grams of fat,” Heather Blanchette, registered and certified dietitian-nutritionist, says.

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Dark Meat

“I would also avoid the dark meat,” Blanchette says. Just 6 oz. dark meat with skin is 310 calories and 12 grams of fat compared to 6 oz. turkey breast with skin which is about 260 calories and 5 grams of fat, she adds.

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Sweet Potato Casserole

Sweet potato casserole is loaded with brown sugar and marshmallows is not a healthy choice, Blanchette says.  “One cup has 300 calories, 15 grams of fat, and 37 grams of sugar.”

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Pecan and Apple Pies

One slice of pecan pie has 503 calories and 27 grams of fat, and 1 slice of apple pie has 411 calories and 19.4 grams of fat, Blanchette says. “If you have to have pie for dessert, 1 slice pumpkin pie would be 316 calories and 14 grams of fat.”

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Canned Cranberry Sauce

“These are usually high in sugar from high fructose corn syrup and have very little of the nutritional benefits that real cranberries are known for,” Jason Barbour, highly sought-after strength and nutritional consultant, says. “I really like cranberry salads, so I always use real cranberries in the recipe.”

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Gravy Made from Packets

These are usually full of MSGs and are more chemical than food, Barbour says. “Gravy has always gotten a bad [reputation], but can be quite healthy if made right. I use some of the fat from the free range turkey, which is almost pure omega 3, and use arrowroot to thicken it and keep it gluten free,” she adds.

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Factory-Farmed Turkey

“Many of today’s farms are actually large industrial facilities, not the green pastures and red barns that we envision,” Barbour says. They are able to produce in high volume, but have little regard for the environment or animal welfare, he adds. “I prefer to eat a free range turkey that has room to roam and eats a natural diet.” This means a bird that consumes no GMOs and is less likely to need antibiotics.

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Dinner Rolls & Butter

“A slice of bread or a dinner roll with butter is an easy way to 200+ calories to a meal,” Alexandra Miller, RDN, LDN, Corporate Dietitian, Medifast, says. “Plus, it lacks nutrition. It’s a source of refined carbohydrates (in most, not all cases) and saturated fat, which you really don’t need at a Thanksgiving meal.” Skip the bread and butter, and indulge in foods that are truly worth it, she adds.

Foods That Nutritionists Would Never Eat on Thanksgiving