This is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When You Have Diabetes from This is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When You Have Diabetes

This is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When You Have Diabetes

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This is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When You Have Diabetes

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When the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or when the body has trouble making good use of the insulin it produces, diabetes may develop, according to the International Diabetes Federation.

“The thing is that being insulin dependent is kind of like doing math all day while walking on a tight rope between two high buildings,” said Jeff Dachis, founder and CEO of One Drop, of being diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. “Too little insulin, and I die slowly over time due to the complications of diabetes. Too much insulin and I can drop into a coma and die instantly. So, you have to get it right.”

Early detection and treatment can reduce the chances of developing further complications of diabetes. There are also diet changes you may make to reduce your risk for diabetes, some of which include avoiding processed and packaged foods, eating more protein, cutting down on sodium, and eating more healthy fats.
 

High Blood Sugar

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Dachis explains that when his blood sugar is high, he feels slothy and foggy, and he moves like he has on cement shoes. “No matter how much you drink, you can't quench your thirst. No matter how much you eat, you can't satisfy your hunger,” he says. “There's all this sugar swirling around in your blood, and without insulin, it just can't get into your cells to give you the energy you need.”

Low Blood Sugar

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"There's not enough sugar in your blood, so you're running like a car with an empty tank. If you catch it in time, you've got just enough energy to find food and shovel it down,” Dachis says. “Your body starts sending you all the emergency signs. Adrenaline kicks in and you're sweating, your mind is racing, you feel like you're spinning... all you can think is 'I need food NOW.'” You may get confused, find yourself slurring your words, and have a tough time putting thoughts together.

In-Range Blood Sugar

When your blood sugar is in range, it feels great, Dachis says. “Your energy is up, and you can take on anything. It's like not having diabetes at all. You only feel it when your blood sugar goes out of range.”

Constant Hunger

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When your blood sugar is low, you may find yourself consuming almost anything in your path, Dachis says. “Dietary restrictions no longer apply — I don't eat meat, but I've eaten 4 mini slider burgers in under a minute. Your brain turns off and your gut takes over. I NEED FOOD!" 

Constant Thirst

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When your blood sugar is high, you are more likely to suffer from extreme thirst and, no matter how much you drink, you are constantly left feeling dehydrated. Dachis says that “you're insatiably thirsty — everything you drink seems to go right through you.”

Frequent Urination

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Constant dehydration leads to consuming an excessive amount of water, which then causes frequent urination. This is also a process in which your body tries to rid excess glucose.

Weight Gain

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Your cells are not getting enough energy and your body reacts by signaling to your brain that you are hungry. The more you eat the more weight you will gain.

Weight Loss

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In some cases, people with diabetes also experience weight loss because their bodies are unable to properly convert food into energy and food winds up as excess glucose circulating in the blood, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. “Ultimately the body can't use all that extra glucose circulating in the blood and so it is eliminated in the urine,” the center explains.

Blurred Vision

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Blurred vision is a common sign of diabetes mellitus and is usually one of the first warning signs of the disease. It causes the inability to see details and loss of the sharpness of vision. You may also get blurred vision when you first begin your insulin treatment.

Change in Mood

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When your blood sugar fluctuates, and the stresses of managing diabetes everyday becomes too much to handle, it is likely that you will become moody and short-tempered. You may begin to suffer from depression-like symptoms.

Fatigue

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When your blood sugar fluctuates, you may feel extremely tired. When you’re exhausted “everything is overwhelming.” Climbing up a flight of stairs feels like climbing Mt. Everest, and it takes everything in you to get to the top, Dachis says. “Or, if you're lucky, you remember there's a granola bar in your bag, so you stop half-way through and chow down. Within minutes, everything is back to normal,” he says.

Injury Susceptibility

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Diabetics may experience nerve damage; this can affect their perception of cold, heat, and pain, making them more prone to injuries.

Kidney Damage

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According to research, high levels of blood sugar cause the kidneys to filter too much blood. This is hard on the filters. The stress of overworked kidneys may cause a buildup of waste in the blood, which then may result in kidney failure.

Swollen Gums

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Your ability to fight off germs has weakened, which in turn raises the risk of infection in your gums and bones that hold your teeth in place, Mayo Clinic explains. “Your gums may pull away from your teeth, your teeth may become loose, or you may develop sores or pockets of pus in your gums.”

Tingling in Hands and Feet

Uncontrolled blood sugar may lead to mild nerve damage or diabetic neuropathy. This may cause a tingling sensation in your hands and feet.