This is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When It’s Too Hot from This is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When It’s Too Hot

This is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When It’s Too Hot

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This is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When It’s Too Hot

Summer…possibly the best time of the year because people travel, have time off, and spend vacations together. But it’s scorching hot - in and outside - and the sweat just doesn’t seem to go away.

But with summer comes extreme heat. It’s important to take precaution and make sure that regardless of what activity you are participating in outdoors you are always safe.

Heat exhaustion is basically extreme dehydration that puts a lot of pressure on your heart. Heat stroke is even more serious.

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Goosebumps

It may be surprising to find out when you may actually feel chills when the body is too hot, but this is the body’s way of protecting itself – it is producing inflammatory proteins. They mess with your thermoregulation, which is why you may feel goosebumps.

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Tingling sensation in the skin

This is an early sign of possible heat stroke or heat exhaustion. The reason is that the sweat gets kind of stuck under the skin and that results in an annoying, irritable and itchy sensation. Get inside a cool place if you start feeling like this.

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Dull headache

The mix of hot air, high humidity and overexertion is one to avoid. A headache is a possible sign of heat stroke, which is the dangerous condition of the body not being able to cool itself naturally. People may also get cluster headaches, which typically affect one side of the face and are characterized by severe pain around the eye, according to WebMD.

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Nausea

This is usually among the first signs that the body if too warm. It indicates dehydration or an electrolyte imbalance. It’s no surprise that you feel so terrible since the body actually needs water and electrolytes like potassium and sodium in order to be able to control its temperature.

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Cramping

Anyone who has ever watched tennis or soccer has seen players occasionally being taken off court or field due to cramping. These involuntary spasms of muscles occur in hot or humid weather. They are linked to dehydration. If there hasn't been adequate fluid replacement, the muscles may cramp.

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Sweating profusely

Sweating helps maintain body temperature by cooling it down. The moisture evaporates and cools the body off. Sweating is also the body’s way of getting rid of toxins.

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No sweating at all

This is a sign of heat stroke, which is a medical emergency. The inability to sweat – when a person’s sweat glands are no longer functioning as they should – can cause overheating, which can lead to heat stroke. Certain conditions, such as diabetes, can inhibit the autonomic nerves, causing problems with the sweat glands. 

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Agitation

The word “hotheaded” used to describe a cranky person is probably not a coincidence. Hot and humid weather has been linked to aggression many times, with the most famous example being the crime rate in Chicago spiking in the summer. Several studies have also found a positive correlation.

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Confusion

The most vulnerable tissues when the body gets too hot are the nerve cells. It makes sense then that the brain, which is basically just nerve cells, is affected.

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Dizziness

The body’s normal response to heating is to send more blood to the skin – the blood vessels dilate to increase blood flow to the skin. But the blood is losing volume due to sweating. The result is lower blood pressure, leading to a heart working harder because it’s carrying less blood to the body. In severe cases this could mean less oxygen to the brain, which can lead to fainting.

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Lethargy

There is a simple explanation as to why people get lazy in the summer. Thermoregulation is a process that requires energy, which the body gets from glucose. When it’s cooling itself down, the body actually uses up a lot of that energy, leaving just a little extra for other activities. It takes more energy to cool down that it does to warm up.

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Dark urine

Most of the time dark urine is a sign of dehydration, which is making you sick in several different ways. When you are well hydrated, your urine is a light yellow or even clear. Getting overheated can actually speed up dehydration.

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Fast heartbeat

Blood pressure falls and the pulse increases as you dehydrate. The heart has to work hard to maintain the amount of blood being pumped out to the body, so if there is less fluid in the system, the heart does not completely fill, so it has to beat faster to accommodate.

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Dehydration

Not having enough water in the body means that the brain tissue is losing water, causing it to shrink and pull away from the skull, eventually leading to a headache, among many other health problems.

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Cold skin

A pale or cold skin can be a sign of heat exhaustion. It’s about that sweat. As the perspiration leaves the body’s sweat glands, it hits the skin’s surface. It is now. The evaporation is what cools down the skin.

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Gut function declines

When it’s too hot the heart is pumping harder than usual to push less blood to more of the body. To compensate, some of the blood is diverted from the gut. Lack of blood for a long period of time may lead to leaky gut and diarrhea.   

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Muscle damage

Muscle cells need water to maintain their balance of electrolytes, which basically get purged as you’re sweating. If there is inadequate amount of fluids the cells will shrink, hurting performance. Even a 1.5 percent decrease in hydration can lead to strength loss.

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Dysfunctional kidneys

When dehydration occurs there is a shunt of blood away from the gut and kidneys so that the blood will preferentially go to the heart and the brain,” Dr. Joseph N. Chorley from Texas Children’s Hospital says. “With decreased blood to the kidneys, there is less nutrition and oxygen to the kidneys that results in damage.”

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You’re Thirsty

You may not be sweating yet, but you’re thirsty. This is usually the first sign of dehydration. The body needs water for a huge number of chemical reactions that control many functions. Drinking water helps restock the fluids lost by sweating, which you may not quite feel yet because it happens very quickly, until it becomes excessive.

This is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When It’s Too Hot