Dog breeds that are prone to obesity from Dog Breeds That Are Prone to Obesity

Dog Breeds That Are Prone to Obesity

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Dog breeds that are prone to obesity

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Dog breeds that are prone to obesity

Here are 20 popular kinds of pups that have higher risks for becoming overweight because of genetic factors, slower metabolisms and more.

Basset hounds

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Basset hounds

Even though basset hounds were bred as hunting dogs, their figures are not predisposed to stay svelte if they're inactive pets rather than working dogs. Their stocky frame and short legs mean they don't run or burn calories much and tend to be lazy if left to their own devices.

Beagles

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Beagles

One of the most frequently overweight breeds is the beagle. One of the most popular purebred family dogs in the country, beagles have slower metabolisms that most dogs and get over-excited about food, often eating past their capacity since they scarf down anything in sight. This poses less of the threat when they're young and more active, but much like humans, their metabolism and activity slow down as they age. If you continue to feed your older beagle like a puppy, he or she will pack on the pounds.

Bichon frises

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Bichon frises

Bichon frises can easily become obese. A few extra pounds on these small dogs' frames can cause or exacerbate the breed's other common health issues, such as diabetes and intervertebral disc disease. Bichons’ fluffy white coats can also make it harder to gauge if they've gained extra weight so owners need to be vigilant to check underneath the hood, so to speak.

Boxers

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Boxers

Boxers are naturally trim and active pups, but they're prone to hypothyroidism, a hormone condition that lowers metabolism and energy levels, making them more susceptible to weight gain.

Chihuahuas

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Chihuahuas

Because of their small stature, many chihuahua owners carry them or cuddle with them, but don't walk or exercise them enough. Their size also means even a small amount of extra weight can tip the scales into unhealthy territory.

Cocker spaniels

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Cocker spaniels

Though they were initially bred as sporting dogs, their breeding is also what makes cocker spaniels more genetically predisposed to becoming obese. As house pets, they often lead more sedentary lives than they should. Cockers are also prone to developing hip, knee and thyroid problems that are made worse by extra weight.

Collies

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Collies

Underneath their coats, rough collies are slim dogs bred to work. A pet collie might be sitting around the house all day not getting enough exercise, but it might still eat like it's been herding all day. Collies are susceptible to bloat, so they shouldn't be free-fed, meaning their food sits out all day. They should be fed in smaller portions broken up throughout the day.

Corgis

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Corgis

Many people think rotund corgis are cute, but an overweight corgi could actually develop painful health issues. Corgis love food and pleasing people, so it's easy to be charmed into giving them too many treats, but portion control and regular exercise are necessary to keep them truly happy and healthy.

Dachshunds

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Dachshunds

Dachshunds are genetically prone to obesity and extra weight on their sausage-like frame puts pressure on their spine. Low-impact exercise is necessary to keep them in shape.

English bulldogs

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English bulldogs

According to PetMD, many English bulldog owners tend to overfeed their pets because they incorrectly believe that's how the breed is supposed to look. Bulldogs are also intolerant to exercise or heat because their short muzzles make it hard for them to breathe properly. These factors combined mean English bulldogs are one of the most frequently obese dog breeds.

English mastiffs

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English mastiffs

These big, slow, beefy dogs have a natural predilection for lounging around the house rather than being active. While they might not crave it like other dogs do, mastiffs need owners who will force them to move on regular walks. They don't like to run, so slower-paced strolls are best.

German shepherds

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German shepherds

German shepherds can easily pack on excess weight, which can put additional strain on a breed already prone to hip and elbow dysplasia.

Golden retrievers

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Golden retrievers

Goldens are genetically prone to obesity, and this popular pet is often showered with too many treats and not enough exercise as a family pet. In fact, a 2012 study found that almost 63 percent of golden retrievers in the U.S. are overweight or obese.

Labrador retrievers

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Labrador retrievers

Known as one of the greediest and food-obsessed breeds of dogs, labs are notorious for gobbling up everything in sight. Research suggests that labs have a gene that affects their brain's ability to gauge hunger and recognize the feeling of being full. So unless you strictly monitor their diet, they will overeat.

Newfoundlands

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Newfoundlands

Newfoundlands are big fluffy dogs, but for Newfies, it's a fine line between big and overweight. Because of their size, they tend to not be very active but have big appetites. They're also prone to joint problems, which means they can't be exercised too strenuously, so monitoring their diet is crucial. Extra weight will only make any joint issues your dog has worse.

Pugs

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Pugs

While people certainly coo over a roly-poly pug, these dogs aren't meant to be chubby. Being overweight is dangerous to pugs because it exasperates the issues they already have breathing and cooling themselves down due to their short snouts. Because they were bred to be lap dogs and don't do well with strenuous exercise, a moderate diet is key.

Rottweilers

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Rottweilers

Many Rottweiler owners love their dogs to be big and intimidating, but extra girth will not only slow down these working dogs but also endanger their health. Rotties are prone to developing hypothyroidism as well as hip and elbow dysplasia, all of which are exasperated by extra pounds. Thankfully, these pups love to be physically active, so it's easy to get them moving to shed some weight.

Scottish terriers

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Scottish terriers

Scottish terriers can suffer from hypothyroidism, which reduces a dog's metabolic rate and causes them to feel lethargic. This lack of energy affects their will to exercise, which already isn't as easy for them thanks to their shorter legs. Owners have to be very intentional about taking Scotties on walks to keep them active.

Yorkshire terriers

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Yorkshire terriers

Despite being adored as tiny toy dogs, Yorkshire terriers were bred to be active, and without two or more hours of activity a day, they have a higher risk of obesity. Yorkies also have a reputation as picky eaters, so some doting owners are tempted to feed them bigger portions, richer foods and even human foods to get them to eat. While the ideal weight varies between dogs, experts suggest that an indication of a healthy weight it that an owner should be able to feel a Yorkie's ribs but not see them.