Dangerous Things About Starving You Didn't Know About from Dangerous Things About Starving You Didn't Know About

Dangerous Things About Starving You Didn't Know About

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Dangerous Things About Starving You Didn't Know About

Starvation is an extreme form of malnutrition. It’s so bad and yet so common among people who are looking to lose weight. “Almost everyone is like that unless they have seen a nutritionist,” Personal Trainer and a Nutritionist Elizabeth Borge says. “People want a quick fix. Instead of monitoring what they eat, they just stop.” Such a drastic change in a diet starts a vicious cycle of damage to the body.

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Muscle loss

When you stop eating, you’ll lose a combination of water, fat, and muscle. The body will eventually go to the muscles for energy, Borge says. Proper nutrition and a balanced diet can help reduce loss of lean muscle and promote greater loss of fat mass. Key factors for building muscle include doing less cardio and more lifting, focusing on more compound exercises, and eating protein-rich meals.

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Cardiac arrest

Starving repeatedly increases the risk of heart attacks, research suggests. Women with a healthy weight who went on yo-yo diets on a regular basis to lose extra pounds have more than three times the risk of dying suddenly from a heart attack, according to a new study. It takes about 2-3 months of starving for the heart to start losing muscle, causing tears, Borge says.

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Slow metabolism

If you don’t eat enough, you’ll be tired all the time, which means you won’t be moving as much as before or you should, and that will slow your metabolism down, Borge says. It can take a long time to boost it up again, she adds. “You first have to start eating more, and then the body has to repair itself.” Ways to speed it up include eating high-quality protein, having enough Vitamin D, and having frequent meals.

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Chronic fatigue and dizziness

It’s very simple: People eat for energy. The food goes into the digestive tract and is broken down into smaller molecules of nutrients for the blood to absorb and carry to cells throughout the body. When it doesn’t have the transporter anymore, which is the insulin, the cells don’t get the energy they need and are starving. All the sugar is stuck in the blood and you feel exhausted.

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Irregular periods

Fat is crucial for the body for many reasons, one of which is regular menstruation. Food restriction leads to a reduction of the production of female sex hormones, leading to lower levels in the blood. The body is then forced to stop the menstrual cycle as a way of protecting its blood and protein stores. This is its priority. Manufacturing reproductive hormones is less crucial for the body’s survival.  

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Constipation

Starvation often leads to constipation, Borge says. The body doesn’t have enough digestive juices to break down the food you. It ends up sitting undigested in your stomach. A study found that anorexic women needed regular laxatives or enemas to help flush their colon. Chronic constipation may lead to bloating, abdominal distension, and early satiety leading to pervasive “feelings of being fat.”

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Feeling cold all the time

Feeling like you’re freezing even in warm weather may be a sign of an eating disorder. This is an indication that the body is not metabolically working like it’s supposed to. It is feeling cold because it is undernourished; it doesn’t have enough nutrients to function properly.

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Bloating

The inability to empty the bowels and bloated belly usually go hand in hand, research has shown.  The body needs certain nutrients to repair itself, Borge says. If you’re not providing them, its immune system will go haywire and the body will start retaining water and everything else it needs to function. “It’s a self-defense mechanism.”

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Gallstones

Gallbladder sludge, i.e., thickened gallbladder mucoprotein with tiny entrapped cholesterol crystals, is thought to be the usual precursor of gallstones, according to research. Two main sources of sludge are starvation and rapid weight loss. Sludge can sometimes cause biliary pain, cholecystitis, or acute pancreatitis.

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Eating disorders

People who have a more perfectionist personality or have set routines are more vulnerable. All the stress of reaching the goal can trigger or exacerbate an eating disorder, thus leading to more people being diagnosed and seeking treatment for an eating disorder, according to Dr. Rebecca Wagner, Clinical Director of Eating Recovery Center, Houston.

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Bone problems

Starvation leads to hormones imbalance, Borge says. They won’t function properly. You’re not getting enough calcium, which is crucial to keeping the bones healthy. Calcium is needed to make the bones hard so they can support the body and its weight. If they don’t have what they need, you won’t gain proper bone density, she adds. Teeth decay is also common as a result of lack of calcium.

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Electrolyte imbalances

Starvation wreaks havoc on your body. It causes disturbs electrolyte balance, leading to a vicious cycle of health problems. The sudden and chronic loss of nutrients means you’re consuming fewer electrolytes such as potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium, all of which are important for proper heart health, as well as that of other vital organs.

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Long-term bad habits

Sudden diets are nutritionally unbalanced, which can lead to long-term poor health. They are often extremely difficult to follow, resulting in, for example, binge eating later, and may make you feel unwell. By overeating you are teaching your body to accept unhealthy behaviors. Balanced nutrition, which may entail controlling the intake of a certain nutrients, ensures your body receives the nourishment it needs for optimal health.

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Cravings

Complete elimination of a nutrient means elimination of food groups from the diet and can lead to cravings. They would be welcome if they made people eat celery, apples, and tomatoes. Several ways of fighting them include drinking water when you think you’re hungry, brushing your teeth, eating protein with every meal, and not skipping meals.

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Bad mood and depression

An extreme food regimen that depletes nutrients may lead to mood swings and depression. Research subjecting mice to yo-yo dieting found that the rodents had increased levels of the stress hormone corticosterone and displayed depression-like behavior. Several genes important in regulating stress and eating had changed.

Dangerous Things About Starving You Didn't Know About