20 Reasons You’re Tired All the Time That Have Nothing to Do with Sleep from 20 Reasons You’re Tired All the Time That Have Nothing to Do with Sleep

20 Reasons You’re Tired All the Time That Have Nothing to Do with Sleep

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20 Reasons You’re Tired All the Time That Have Nothing to Do with Sleep

People are used to being in a hurry all of the time so many don’t pay attention when their body feels tired. A YouGov survey on sleep habits found that only about 1 in 7 wake up feeling fresh every day of the week. Nearly half of Americans sleeping 7 to 8 hours a night reported feeling tired or fatigued up to three times a week. The reason why so many people don’t feel rested may have nothing to do with the quality or quantity of sleep they are getting.

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You are anemic

Fatigue is a sign you need more iron in your diet. If you don’t have enough iron, there is less oxygen going to your muscles, which then have no energy, leaving you feeling exhausted and weak. Hemoglobin is a protein that helps red blood cells deliver oxygen throughout your body. Check with your doctor if you feel worn out all the time before your health begins to suffer.

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Dehydration

Not having enough water in your body is making you sick in more than one way. Dehydration slows every process in the body down, including cell function, leaving you feeling sleepy and tired. Blood volume drops, which makes the heart work harder. The best indicator of your hydration is your urine. Someone who is well-hydrated will produce clear or light-colored urine.

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Dysfunctional thyroid gland

Fatigue is a very important sign of low thyroid. Since hyperthyroidism increases your metabolism, many individuals initially have a lot of energy, according to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. However, as the hyperthyroidism continues, the body tends to break down, so being tired is very common. If you are constantly exhausted after sleeping 7-8 hours and not doing a strenuous activity, check your thyroid gland.

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Sitting too much

The price of an inactive lifestyle is high and it comes in the form of physical pain, tiredness, and obesity. It is common knowledge that people who work out on a regular basis have more energy. In fact, cancer patients’ symptoms improved when they began exercising more, a study shows. Other research suggests that light exercise reduced feelings of fatigue by as much as 65 percent and boosted energy levels by 20 percent.

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An infection

Infection, especially one that takes a long time to recover from or treat, such as bacterial endocarditis (infection of the heart muscle or valves), parasitic infections, hepatitis, tuberculosis, and mononucleosis (Epstein-Barr virus) can cause fatigue, according to National Institutes of Health. Doctors will also look for signs of chronic fatigue if they are checking for Lyme disease.

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You’re pre-diabetic

Diabetes symptoms can be subtle which is why people often don’t know they have the disease for months. Food goes into the digestive tract and is broken down into smaller molecules of nutrients for the blood to absorb and carry to cells throughout the body. When it doesn’t have the transporter anymore, which is the insulin, the cells don’t get the energy they need and are starving. All the sugar is stuck in the blood and you feel exhausted.

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Cluttered house

Remove as many little messes as possible. These will be things such as clearing out your closets of all the clothes you haven't worn for two years, shredding all the statements and paperwork you don't need anymore, and removing the clutter from your kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Eliminating these distractions and messes from your life is like untangling a knot inside of you. Clutter makes it more difficult to relax, both physically and mentally, according to psychologists.

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Blood sugar imbalance

After the sugar rush comes the sugar crash. A recent study found that fructose causes significant weight gain, physical inactivity, and body fat deposition. The mice that consumed more sugars traveled about 20 percent less.  If your blood sugar remains unbalanced too frequently the body starts to ignore the insulin message, a condition called insulin resistance. This leads to permanent high blood sugar levels, which can cause weight gain and type 2 diabetes, according to Smart Nutrition.

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Depression

There is a huge difference between feeling sad and being clinically depressed. The latter should never be ignored. Symptoms vary with every patient but one common consequence is decreased energy levels. This is often the result of another common symptom – loss of appetite. Also, studies have shown that some of the medications used to treat major depressive disorder can induce symptoms of fatigue as side effects.

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You don’t eat enough

Breakfast is not the most important meal of the day; they are all equally vital. Just like you don’t skip lunch, you can’t skip breakfast. Have some food to get your metabolism kicking and enough energy to start the day. That means you won’t be overeating later, which will make you feel tired as well because your body has too much food to process. Studies have shown that skipping breakfast was associated with a significantly higher risk of obesity.

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Pills

Many medications for migraines and depression cause fatigue because they increase the level of serotonin in the body, which helps produce melatonin, the sleep hormone, leaving you feeling sleepy. Tiredness is a common side effect of drugs that regulate blood pressure as well, according to AARP. They slow down the pumping action of the heart and depress the entire central nervous system. Another possible side effect of certain meds is weight gain, which also contributes to chronic fatigue.

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You keep your house too warm

This is one surprising way to add years to your life. The heater dries out the air indoors, which can lead to inflamed skin. An acceptable wintertime temperature indoors is 70 degrees for the living room and at least 64 degrees for other rooms, according to the West Midlands Public Health Observatory. Feeling too hot will prevent you from falling asleep or you’ll be tossing and turning trying to feel comfortable, resulting in you feeling lethargic in the morning.

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You need more magnesium

Magnesium is a muscle relaxant that improves sleep quality, according to a study. That’s why many of the foods recommended for consumption to help people sleep well have high levels of it. Magnesium deficiency is associated with other neurological issues such as anxiety and hyperactivity (which also contribute to fatigue). The mineral has a lot to do with electrolyte imbalances and nerve transmission. Too little of it can leads to chronic bad mood, low energy, and clinical depression.

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Alcohol

Booze is not stored the same way fat or carbs are. The body has to work harder, which makes you tired. Alcohol depletes important minerals that are essential to the recovery process, especially after a workout. People who have been drinking fall asleep quicker, but alcohol reduces rapid eye movement (REM), which is when you dream and actually rest, so you feel tired when you wake up.

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Leaky gut

It means “increased intestinal permeability.”  Leaky gut is basically when the lining of the small intestine is damaged, leading to undigested food, toxins and bacteria to “leak” through the intestines into the blood stream, leading to inflammation. One of the potential consequences is chronic fatigue. Any food – whether dairy, grains or even chocolate – that a person is allergic to causes a great deal of extra stress on the body

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Chronic fatigue syndrome

The disease is characterized by profound fatigue, sleep abnormalities, pain, and other symptoms that are made worse by exertion, according to Mayo Clinic. The cause of chronic fatigue syndrome is unknown, although there are many theories — ranging from viral infections to psychological stress. Other than feeling tired all the time, symptoms include sore throat, loss of memory, an inability to concentrate, muscle pain, and headaches.

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Anxiety

Anxiety can be at the root of chronic fatigue, leaving you feeling absolutely drained. Becoming tired is sometimes a coping mechanism – the body uses it to prevent you from experiencing severe stress. Exhaustion allows you to rest so stress doesn’t overwhelm you.

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Bad diet

This is not rocket science – the body needs proper fuel to function properly and that means feeding it healthy foods with enough nutrients. The worse food you put in your body, the worse you will feel. Don’t fill up on refined sugar, complex carbs and processed foods. Unhealthy eating habits lead to inflammation, which causes oxidative stress (imbalance between the production of free radicals and the ability of the body to detoxify their harmful effects), making you look older and feel exhausted.

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Arthritis

Fatigue often comes with arthritis pain, according to the Arthritis Foundation. Dealing with pain day to day can wear you down and cause exhaustion. The inflammatory cytokines (proteins in the blood) released in arthritis are the same ones released when you have a bad cold or the flu. The result is extreme tiredness in both cases.

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You have sleep apnea

Sleep apnea is a serious medical condition. It’s not just lack of sleep; it’s the complete absence of REM sleep, which is the actual restful sleep cycle you need. The subsequent stress on the body is enormous, Dr. Christopher Still, director of the Geisinger Health System Obesity Institute, says. It sparks a vicious cycle where you are left feeling tired, slowing your metabolism, and playing tricks with your hormones. An estimated 18 million Americans have sleep apnea, which is often associated with people who are overweight, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

20 Reasons You’re Tired All the Time That Have Nothing to Do with Sleep