15 Reasons Why Giving Up Coffee and Alcohol Are Worth It from 15 Reasons Why Giving Up Coffee and Alcohol Are Worth It

15 Reasons Why Giving Up Coffee and Alcohol Are Worth It

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15 Reasons Why Giving Up Coffee and Alcohol Are Worth It

Alcoholic beverages and coffee have no season. People want them in the summer to cool off and, especially wine, liquor and hot coffee, in the colder months to warm up. A recent study found that heavy drinking among Americans rose by 17.2 percent between 2005 and 2012. To make matters worse, people consume more in a shorter period of time. Binging is up almost 9 percent. In some ways coffee and alcohol cancel each other out. Research has shown that high coffee intake was associated observationally with low risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. This is not to say that you should drink more alcohol because you can't “fix” the problem with caffeine. Both have too many other negative effects that outweigh the benefits.

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Fatty Liver

Alcohol has been linked to fatty liver disease because it can damage or destroy liver cells, according to the American Liver Foundation. The organ’s job is to process everything we eat and drink, but if you drink more alcohol than it can handle, the liver can be seriously damaged. Alcoholic fatty liver disease is the earliest stage of other drinking-related liver problems. There are usually no symptoms.

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Healthy Teeth

Caffeine hurts your teeth, research shows, and stains are the least of the problems. Enamel surface in people who drank coffee revealed a consistently rougher surface, both before and after acid exposure. After exposure to acid, the calcium and phosphorus contents of the outer surface of the enamel in the caffeine group were greatly reduced. Tooth decay is common among heavy drinkers because of the sugars and acids in alcohol. It is the second most common risk factor for oral cancer.

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Arrhythmia

Alcohol can trigger symptoms of atrial fibrillation (arrhythmia), which increases the risk of stroke by five times. Excess of alcohol stops the liver from making the materials that help the blood to clot. Caffeine does not promote ventricular arrhythmia, unless consumed in very high doses. A 25-year-old woman with a preexisting condition died after drinking 50 mL of a “natural energy” guarana health drink that contained the same amount of caffeine as 8 cups of strong coffee.

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Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of factors that increase the chance of suffering from heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. A study concluded that basically the more you drink, the more likely you are to develop this condition. Symptoms include high blood pressure, insulin resistance, blood clots, and too much belly fat.

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Diabetes

Excessive drinking causes chronic inflammation of the pancreas. As a result, it can’t secrete insulin properly, leading to diabetes. Also, diabetes is a common side effect of chronic pancreatitis, often caused by heavy alcohol use, according to the National Pancreas Foundation. Caffeine can decreases insulin sensitivity in humans by about 15 percent, which is relatively small but can be a cause of concern given the widespread use of caffeine, according to research.

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Belly Fat

Alcohol is fat-sparing, according to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The body will burn the calories from booze first before it burns any fat. Caffeine is bad, too. When the body experiences stress, either in the form of taking in caffeine from coffee, tea or energy drinks, cortisol is released. The body goes into the “fight or flight” response, and blood rushes away from the stomach. Digestion is slowed down; the body increases insulin levels. Over time, it becomes resistant to the constant increase in insulin, leading to weight gain and possibly type 2 diabetes.

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Dehydration

Dehydration can occur as a result of drinking too much alcohol. It lowers the level of the anti-diuretic hormone, which is used by the body to reabsorb water. You lose more fluid than necessary. Diet sodas with caffeine can have the same effect because of artificial sweeteners such as sucralose or aspartame. Dehydration causes bad breath, sugar cravings, fatigue, dizziness, and headaches.

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Better Sleep

Caffeine, a stimulant, affects sleep adversely, Dr. Karl Doghramji, director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, says. It stays in your body for more than seven hours. Even if you are able to fall asleep, you may not enter the deep sleep phase, which is when your brain really rests. Alcohol is eliminated from the body rapidly and causes withdrawal symptoms two or three hours later, he adds. This has a negative reaction. People fall asleep quicker, but alcohol reduces rapid eye movement (REM), which is when you dream and actually rest.

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Cancer

The Department of Health lists consumption of alcoholic beverages as a known human carcinogen. The most common cancers linked to excessive drinking are head and neck cancers, esophageal, liver, breast, colon and rectum, according to the National Cancer Institute. Caffeine may be linked to breast cancer. A meta-analysis suggests that coffee/caffeine might be weakly associated with breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women. Coffee lowers the body’s pH levels and cancer grows in acid environment.

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Heart Failure

Continuous consumption of alcohol weakens the heart muscle. The organ deteriorates because it has more difficulties pumping blood. The lack of blood flow can cause severe damage to organs and tissues, according to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Symptoms of cardiomyopathy include shortness of breath, fatigue, swollen legs and feet, and irregular heartbeat. Research shows that caffeine reduces the body’s ability to boost blood flow to the muscle of the heart during exercise.

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Hypertension

Repeated drinking can raise your blood pressure too much. Older people, especially women, are more at risk. A study says that the regular consumption of alcohol elevates blood pressure. The global estimate attributing to the risk for hypertensive disease from alcohol is 16 percent. Caffeine can cause a spike, too. Research shows that in hypertensive individuals, caffeine intake produces an acute increase in blood pressure for 3 or more hours.

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Heartburn

Heartburn after drinking happens because of alcohol’s effect on the body’s physical functions, as well as the chemical reactions that happen in the stomach, according to Heartburn Remedies. When people drink alcohol, the lower esophageal sphincter relaxes and allows that acid to enter the tube. Too much caffeine causes the muscle that connects the stomach to the esophagus to relax, creating an opening for stomach acid to enter the esophagus causing acid reflux.

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Addiction

Caffeine and alcohol are chemically addictive. Many caffeine consumers may be unaware of their physical dependence because their frequent habitual consumption precludes a period of sustained abstinence (e.g. 2 days), according to John Hopkins Medicine. Also, low doses of caffeine can partially suppress withdrawal symptoms. Symptoms of withdrawal from both include irritability, headaches, fatigue, anxiety, vomiting, and stiffness.

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Cirrhosis

Alcoholic liver cirrhosis, where healthy liver tissue is replaced with scar tissue, is the most advanced form of liver illness that has to do with drinking. Fatty liver disease is usually the first signal. For cirrhosis to develop, a person has to be abusing alcohol for years. Interestingly, research shows that coffee, but not other beverages containing caffeine, may inhibit the onset of alcoholic and nonalcoholic liver cirrhosis.

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You’ll Save Money

Imagine how much money you’ll save by not spending $5 a day on coffee (or more if you drink soda). Let’s assume you go out every Friday or Saturday night and spend $30 on cocktails, beer or other drinks. You will easily save at least $120 a month if you stopped drinking, and another $100 from giving up coffee.

15 Reasons Why Giving Up Coffee and Alcohol Are Worth It