15 Everyday Habits That Increase Stress from 15 Everyday Habits That Increase Stress

15 Everyday Habits That Increase Stress

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15 Everyday Habits That Increase Stress

We have all experienced it at one point or another: stress. Maybe you’re overwhelmed, you’ve been dealing with personal issues, or you’re overworking yourself. Whatever it may be, it’s time to acknowledge it.

There are things you do every day that you might not realize are increasing your stress levels. For instance, eating unhealthy foods, dealing with a toxic relationship, smoking, and bringing work home with you all have the power to worsen your stress.

*Related: 7 Natural Remedies for Stress and Anxiety

Stress can affect your mental and physical well-being. It may also cause anxiety, digestive issues, headaches, insomnia, depression, and mood disorders.

Think carefully about what is stressing you out, then work on eliminating those factors and overcoming them.

 

--Nicole Dossantos, Editor The Active Times

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Being a People-Pleaser

If you are always trying to please everyone else, how will you ever feel content with yourself? Saying yes to everyone is overwhelming; it will drain you mentally and cause you more stress. Focus on your needs first, then, if you have the time, go ahead and tackle matters that others ask of you.

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Bringing Work Home With You

Although it may be difficult, it’s important to leave work at work; don’t bring the stress from your day home with you. This will stress you out both mentally and physically. After work you should focus on winding down, relaxing, and clearing your mind.

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Commuting to Work

Dealing with traffic and clusters of people on a daily basis can be extremely stressful. Unfortunately, you can’t avoid your commute; you just have to learn healthy ways to cope with it. Try to learn different breathing exercises, and use meditation as a form of relaxation when you start feeling the stress of your commute getting to you.

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Drinking Coffee

Caffeinated drinks have the ability to put you in a state of short-term anxiety. You may experience increased stress, negative thinking, nervousness, or fatigue. It also may contribute to insomnia. Drinking caffeine too close to your bedtime may result in a restless night’s sleep. Tip: Don’t consume caffeine at least six hours before bed.

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Eating Unhealthy Foods

By eating unhealthy foods such as sweets, you are likely enhancing your stress levels. Refined sugar and processed foods may alter your blood sugar levels, which may result in mood swings, increased hunger, depression, and inability to think clearly.

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Focusing on the Negative Instead of the Positive

Believe it or not, your attitude plays a huge role in your stress levels. If you are constantly worrying, thinking negative thoughts, or setting unrealistic goals, you are likely to suffer from higher levels of stress. Tell yourself that everything will be OK, look on the bright side of things, and set goals that are achievable. Once you change your attitude and put a positive spin on the situations in your life, you will be able to reduce your stress.

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Lack of Exercise

Exercising regularly has been proven to help reduce stress. According to the ADAA, “studies show that it is very effective at reducing fatigue, improving alertness and concentration, and at enhancing overall cognitive function. This can be especially helpful when stress has depleted your energy or ability to concentrate."

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Lack of Sleep

Sleep and stress are highly connected. When you’re stressed, it’s hard to rest your mind and body, therefore leading to sleep deprivation. This may cause impaired concentration, mood changes, and even depression, to name a few. A good night’s sleep will make you better prepared to tackle the coming day.

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Overthinking

Obsessing over whatever is bothering you will only lead to increased stress. If it’s something you can’t control, let it go; there is nothing you can do to change it — especially when it comes to thinking about the past. Try practicing mindful living: Focus your awareness on the present, live in the moment, and cut out all negative distractions.

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Overworking

Working too much is associated with increased levels of stress. You need to make it a priority to set aside time for yourself outside of the office. Treat yourself to something nice, take a mental health day, or spend quality time with the people you love.

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Procrastinating

The longer you put off your tasks, the more stressed out you will be in the long run. If you have the time now, why wait? It’s already hard enough to find time to get everything you need done. Prioritize your tasks and your time each day to avoid procrastinating. Click here for 5 Ways to Prevent Procrastination.

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Relationship Issues

Are you in a toxic relationship? Believe it or not, relationships are huge stressors. Between family, friends, and partners, our stress levels are tested on a daily basis. So, how do you minimize relationship stress? Have a positive attitude, don’t make assumptions; acknowledge, respect, and encourage each other.

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Smoking

Although smokers believe smoking helps relieve their stress, it is merely a distraction. Smoking will only worsen your stress and ultimately cause more problems later in life.

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Using a Smart Phone

In today’s world it’s important to have a phone, however, it should only be used when absolutely necessary. Your smart phone may be messing with your health by affecting your memory, interfering with sleep, straining your eyes, causing neck and back pain, and affecting your hearing.

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Venting

Talking about your problems is supposed to be helpful, and in most cases it is. However, it can also be detrimental to overcoming your issues. The more you linger on your problems, the harder it is to let them go.

15 Everyday Habits That Increase Stress